Octave Day of the Nativity of Our Lord (1st Sunday in Salisbury)

Laudetur Iesus Christus and blessed Octave Day of Christmas. Sunday is the Octave of Christmas, and in years where this date falls outside of Sunday, it would be the feast of the Circumcision, the 8th day when Christ first shed his blood. As custom, we share a reflection on the orations for Sunday’s Latin Mass, as well as commentary by Dom Prosper Gueranger:

Please note: There will not be a potluck after the St. Thomas Aquinas Latin Mass today. It will resume in February.

Christmas Thanks: We wanted to express our thanks to our Latin Mass priests for their devotion in all the Christmas liturgies, and a special thanks to Fr. Reid for the blessing of religious objects before Christmas. Please consider offering a decade of one’s Rosary for our Latin Mass priests.

Pray for the repose of the soul of Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI

Please pray for the repose of the soul of Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI who passed away Saturday morning December 31 – the feast of St. Sylvester I, the Pope of Peace. Locally, if there is one Pope in recent years who has touched the daily lives of many faithful in Charlotte, it was Pope Benedict. His July 2007 motu proprio, Summorum Pontificum, gave the laity and clergy greater access to the Traditional Latin Mass. One might say Benedict XVI “saved” the Latin Mass. His policy began to reach our diocese in late 2007 when a Latin Mass training seminar was arranged for several priests.

Moreover, it was the provisions of Summorum Pontificum, and its 2011 instructions Universae Ecclesiae, that allowed the CLMC to successfully petition for the Sunday Latin Mass at St. Ann in Charlotte in 2012-2013. When St. Ann parish council said “No” to our request and when Bishop Jugis said “No” to our appeal – the CLMC, using the canonical provisions available, petitioned Rome, and just mere hours or days before Pope Benedict’s resignation in February 2013, Rome instructed the Diocese of Charlotte to implement a Sunday Latin Mass, and the rest is history. If you are attending a Latin Mass in the diocese of Charlotte today, it was certainly the result of Pope Benedict and Summorum Pontificum. You can read Fr. Reid’s 2013 announcement here: https://charlottelatinmass.files.wordpress.com/2022/03/2013-2-17-saint-ann-bulletin_pastors-letter.pdf

This Sunday, let all Latin Mass faithful pray for Benedict XVI’s happy repose and despite its limitations, give thanks to God for Summorum Pontificum. CLMC would hope that if any public commemorations are conducted in the diocese, that it would recognize this most important contribution of Pope Benedict XVI to the faithful of Charlotte: The greater access of the Traditional Latin Mass, which continues to this day in several parishes throughout the diocese. 

We close this reflection with the CLMC’s Brian Williams, who writing in 2017, aptly summed up Benedict’s legacy: https://liturgyguy.com/2017/09/12/what-benedict-accomplished-with-summorum-pontificum/

First Sunday Latin Mass – Salisbury

There will be a 4pm Latin Mass on Sunday January 1 at Sacred Heart parish in Salisbury. Fr. Joseph Wasswa will offer the Mass, and Confessions will be offered prior to Mass. A potluck will occur in Brincefield Hall after Mass – please bring a favorite Christmas dish, hors d’oeuvres or dessert to share. For more information please contact Mark Hartley with the Salisbury Latin Mass Community at: www.salisburylmc.org

Plenary Indulgence for January 1

There is a plenary indulgence under the usual conditions offered on the last day and first day of the year when one takes part in the recitation of the Te Deum hymn (December 31) and the Veni Creator (January 1) in a church or oratory. The former is recited in thanksgiving for the blessings the past year, and the latter is to ask for divine assistance for the coming new year. Learn more here: https://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2012/12/plenary-indulgence-reminders-te-deum-on.html (prayers are attached)

Epiphany Week Latin Mass Schedule

Wednesday January 4, 6pm – St. Ann parish, Feria (Commemoration of St. Elizabeth Ann Seton)

Thursday January 5 – Vigil of the Epiphany

  • 6:30pm (Blessing only – No Mass), St. Ann parish, Epiphany water, chalk, and salt blessing (no Latin Mass scheduled, only a blessing)
  • 7pm Latin Mass, St. Thomas Aquinas parish, (No Epiphany blessing – Epiphany water, chalk and salt to be handed out at parish from January 6-8 while quantities last, see parish website for details)
  • 7pm, (Blessing only – No Mass), Prince of Peace, Taylors, SC – Epiphany Lessons and Carols, followed by blessing of gold, frankincense and myrrh, and Epiphany holy water

** Please note the blessing of Epiphany water can take up to 45 minutes as it contains exorcism prayers and litany of the saints

Friday January 6 – Feast of the Epiphany

  • Normal schedule unless otherwise announced (7am Latin Mass – St. Ann & 12:30pm Latin Mass – St. Mark)
  • 3:30pm, Our Lady of the Lake, Chapin, SC (2 hours south of Charlotte)
  • 6:00pm, Church of the Epiphany*, 163 Galax Lane, Blowing Rock, NC (operated by St. Elizabeth of the Hill Country in Boone, 2 hours northwest of Charlotte)
  • 6:30pm, St. John the Baptist, Tryon, (2 hours west of Charlotte)
  • 7pm – Our Lady of Grace, Greensboro (1.5 hours north of Charlotte)
  • 7pm – Prince of Peace, Taylors, SC (2 hours southwest of Charlotte)

Saturday January 7, 10am – St. Thomas Aquinas, Feria or First Saturday (Blessing of religious objects after Mass in the narthex)

Holy Face Devotions

  • St Mark – Mondays 2-2:45pm
  • St. Thomas Aquinas – Tuesdays 6am in the main church
  • St. Ann – Tuesdays 7:30am in the chapel after the Novus Ordo Mass (uses the booklet/chaplet which takes 15-20 minutes)
  • St. Michael the Archangel, Gastonia – Tuesdays, 9am, Main Church (**NEW TIME & LOCATION**)
  • Holy Spirit, Denver – Tuesdays 10-11am after the Novus Ordo Mass
  • Don’t see your parish? Why not organize one?

March for Life Charlotte – Latin Mass

The annual March for Life Charlotte will be on Friday, January 13, 2023. Attendees can gather at the parking lot across from the diocese’s pastoral center (1123 South Church Street) beginning at 11am. The march begins at 12 noon, and a rally will occur at the corner of Trade and Tryon Streets. The evening prior, on Thursday January 12, the normal 7pm Latin Mass at St. Thomas Aquinas part will be offered for the unborn, as part of the event. For questions visit: https://www.marchforlifecharlotte.com/

Christmas on a Sunday – Dom Prosper Gueranger

As we close out the Christmas Octave, we wanted to share something unique to this year’s Advent and Christmas. Advent this year was one of the longest in recent years as occurred for a full four weeks (symbolizing the 4,000 years between Adam and Christ). Christmas Day 2022 itself fell on a Sunday, which according to the Benedictine liturgist Dom Prosper Gueranger, has a special meaning:

[T]here is the venerable tradition which tells us that the Incarnation of the Son of God having been accomplished on a Friday (March 25), the Birth of Jesus, the Light of the world, must have taken place on December 25, a Sunday. This gives a peculiar sacredness to Christmas Day when it falls on a Sunday, as it was on that day of the week that God began the Creation, and said: Let there be Light! and on the same, also, did our Lord rise from the tomb.

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • Prayers and Support Needed for a Growing Order of Benedictine Nuns: An inspiring video about the growth of the traditional Benedictine Nuns in Missouri (who attend the Latin Mass exclusively) and their need for help in building a new, second Abbey under the patronage of St. Joseph and will also feature a St. Joseph shrine to fathers: https://vimeo.com/766262621
  • Six Thousand Years of Human History Before the Antichrist: The Kolbe Center for the Study of Creation (whom the CLMC co-sponsored their 2019 visit) posted an interesting article before Christmas exploring the traditional Catholic view held by those such as St. Irenaeus that the world would last for six thousand years before the rise of the Antichrist, and how modern genealogy is confirming this possibility as the human race’s genetics continue to deteriorate: https://www.kolbecenter.org/kolbe-report-12-17-22/
  • Why 1962 Must Eventually Perish: The Case of St. John: Dr. Peter Kwasniewski (whom the CLMC hosted last September) writes a brief but compelling thesis that the Missal of 1962 must eventually perish. Why? Because although it is the current missal for the Traditional Latin Mass offered at most parishes, the 1962 missal was already compromised by the progressive revolutionary “reforms” that the Church would later see in its competition after Vatican II. Case in point is that prior to 1962, the feasts immediately following Christmas (St. Stephen, St. John, Holy Innocents) would not be suppressed if they fell on a Sunday – recognizing how important these feasts are to the Christmas season. Sadly these feasts are now suppressed if they fall on a Sunday. Kwasniewski argues that the “gold standard” for a Traditional Latin Mass missal would be to return to the 1920 missal. https://www.newliturgicalmovementorg/2022/12/why-1962-must-eventually-perish-case-of.html#.Y6np3BXMKHs
  • Games People Play with the Holy Spirit: Is the Vatican II Council Relevant? What about the Council of Vienne? What was the spirit of Lateran IV? These are but a few of the questions Dr. Kwasniewski answers in his reply to an individual who has been told by his conservative Catholic friends that the solution to the crisis in the Church is to just offer the Novus Ordo properly as intended by the Vatican II documents (Latin, with chant, ad orientum), and thus there is no need for the Traditional Latin Mass. Of course, Dr. Kwasniewski counters with an excellent reply which examines the problematic or failed councils of the past and their legacies: https://onepeterfive.com/games-holy-spirit/
  • IT’S THE MASS THAT MATTERS: A Study in Faithful Resistance: Imagine if three priests in the Diocese of Charlotte went to Bishop Jugis years ago and said they were called to only offer the Traditional Latin Mass, and to this day they still offer the Latin Mass exclusively to this very day. Would that not be an interesting and inspiring story? Well it didn’t happen in Charlotte, but it did occur in the diocese of Novara, in northern Italy, in 2008, and these priests have survived and still offer the Latin Mass exclusively in their diocese, even after Traditionis Custodes. As author Hilary White explains:  

Some years ago, I heard an extraordinary story from a friend who lived for a time in the extreme northern end of the country, in a remote and beautiful valley of the Alps, the Val d’Ossola. In brief, three priests one day told their bishop that they would no longer celebrate the Mass in the new rite, and adopted the traditional Mass when Summorum Pontificum was published. And despite immense pressure and months of struggle, they never did again.

The story has thus far had a happy ending; the priests continue celebrating the traditional Mass exclusively, and preaching and teaching the holy and ancient Faith while remaining in good standing in their diocese, even well into the Bergoglian period.

They simply announced that, within their rights as priests, they would celebrate only the Mass of the Ages, and that was that.

You can read the rest of the article here: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/articles/item/6312-it-s-the-mass-that-matters-a-study-in-faithful-resistance

Don’t Stop Celebrating: After Christmas Day, Christmas continues

“Catholics ought to have a totally different conception of Christmas (from what the secular world offers).” – Dr. Peter Kwasniewski, December 24, 2019

In what is becoming an annual CLMC tradition and a rallying cry for the full restoration of the Traditional Latin Mass in Charlotte, we repost Dr. Peter Kwasniewski’s brilliant December 2019 article which reminds Latin Mass attendees of the treasure and precious gold they have in the traditional liturgical calendar, especially the traditional Christmas Season according to the 1962 Missal (and prior). If one hasn’t read this article, we can only encourage everyone to read it again, and again. While the world enters into their “post-Christmas fast”, traditional Catholics begin 40 days of festivals and feasts of the Christmas season, which runs in stages from December 25 – February 2nd (Candlemas/Feast of the Purification)  We should be clear, this Christmas season can only be fully celebrated in the Traditional Latin Mass calendar, as sadly the Novus Ordo calendar eliminated much the Christmas season – particularly the Epiphany season. Here is an excerpt:

It is very important for us not to surrender to the secular approach that, in a way, celebrates Christmas before Christmas and not afterward. We should really make an effort — in the way our homes are decorated, the way we observe Sundays and holy days, the stories we read and the other activities we do in the house — to keep the spirit of Christmas alive, even if at a “low burn,” throughout this period from December 26 to February 2. Yes, the great feast is that big of a deal! Such observance also becomes a countercultural catechesis in one of the central mysteries of the Christian faith: the Incarnation of the Son of God. This is the pivot point of all human history and of the story of each man, woman, and child.

A few newcomers to the Latin Mass might ask – what exactly is the difference in the Christmas season between the Traditional Latin Mass and Novus Ordo Mass? The CLMC’s Brian Williams teamed up with Dr. Kwasniewski a few years ago to briefly explain how the two calendars differ (and why the Traditional calendar is preferred):

Christmas has just begun and so continues 32 more days of celebrating the Incarnation and all its mysteries.

As we bring this update to a close, we share Pope Benedict XVI’s famous quote from Summorum Pontificum:

What earlier generations held as sacred, remains sacred and great for us too, and it cannot be all of a sudden entirely forbidden or even considered harmful.”

What Mass are you attending on Sunday?

Blessed New Year and God Bless,

~ Charlotte Latin Mass Community

Christmas Octave Update (1st Sunday Mass in Salisbury)

Laudetur Iesus Christus and blessed Christmas greetings on the sixth day within the Octave of Christmas. We have a few updates to share as we head into the Christmas Octave weekend:

Sunday January 1 – Octave Day of Christmas

All Masses times should be on a normal Sunday schedule. Our Lady of Grace in Greensboro will also offer a special Midnight Latin Mass on January 1, in addition to its normal 1pm Sunday Latin Mass.

First Sunday Latin Mass – Salisbury

There will be a 4pm Latin Mass on Sunday January 1 at Sacred Heart parish in Salisbury. Fr. Joseph Wasswa will offer the Mass, and Confessions will be offered prior to Mass. A potluck will occur in Brincefield Hall after Mass – please bring a favorite Christmas dish, hors d’oeuvres or dessert to share. For more information please contact Mark Hartley with the Salisbury Latin Mass Community visit: www.salisburylmc.org

Plenary Indulgence for December 31 & January 1

There is a plenary indulgence under the usual conditions offered on the last day and first day of the year when one takes part in the recitation of the Te Deum hymn (Friday December 31) and the Veni Creator (Saturday January 1) in a church or oratory. The former is recited in thanksgiving for the blessings the past year, and the latter is to ask for divine assistance for the coming new year. Learn more here: https://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2012/12/plenary-indulgence-reminders-te-deum-on.html (prayers are attached)

Epiphany Latin Mass Schedule

Thursday January 5 – Vigil of the Epiphany

  • 6:30pm (Blessing only – No Mass), St. Ann parish, Epiphany water, chalk, and salt blessing (no Latin Mass scheduled, only a blessing)
  • 7pm Latin Mass, St. Thomas Aquinas parish (No Epiphany blessing – Epiphany water, chalk and salt to be handed out at parish from January 6-8 while quantities last, see parish website for details)
  • 7pm, (Blessing only – No Mass), Prince of Peace, Taylors, SC – Epiphany Lessons and Carols, followed by blessing of gold, frankincense and myrrh, and Epiphany holy water

** Please note the blessing of Epiphany water can take up to 45 minutes as it contains exorcism prayers and litany of the saints

Friday January 6 – Feast of the Epiphany

  • Normal schedule unless otherwise announced (7am Latin Mass – St. Ann & 12:30pm Latin Mass – St. Mark)
  • 3:30pm, Our Lady of the Lake, Chapin, SC (2 hours south of Charlotte)
  • 6:00pm, Church of the Epiphany*, 163 Galax Lane, Blowing Rock, NC (operated by St. Elizabeth of the Hill Country in Boone, 2 hours northwest of Charlotte)
  • 6:30pm, St. John the Baptist, Tryon, (2 hours west of Charlotte)
  • 7pm – Our Lady of Grace, Greensboro (1.5 hours north of Charlotte)
  • 7pm – Prince of Peace, Taylors, SC (2 hours southwest of Charlotte)

Feast of Pope St. Sylvester (Pope of Peace) – December 31

Tomorrow December 31, is the second to last day of the Christmas Octave and in the liturgical calendar the Church seemingly offers an unusual choice of a saint during this important week – Pope Saint Sylvester who reigned between the years of 314-335 AD, and was one of the first Popes to not die a martyr. Why place him on the calendar within the Christmas Octave? As Dom Prosper Gueranger mentions in his book The Liturgical Year, Pope Sylvester was the “Messenger of Peace”, who transitioned the Church and society into the peaceful era after Christianity was legalized in 313 AD with the Edict of Milan. St. Sylvester symbolizes the coming of the Prince of Peace, who came into the world with His Nativity on Christmas to bring peace between God and man. Gueranger writes:

SO far, the only ones we have seen standing round the Crib of our Jesus have been Martyrs: Stephen, overwhelmed with the shower of stones; John, the Martyr in heart, who survived his fiery torture; the Holy Innocents, massacred by the sword; Thomas, murdered in his cathedral; these are the champions of Christ, who keep guard in the palace of Bethlehem. Yet all Christians are not called to be Martyrs. Besides this countless battalion of the King’s favourite soldiers, there are other troops of sainted heroes which form the heavenly army; and amongst these there are the Confessors, who conquered the world without shedding their blood in the combat. Though the place of honour in the service of the King belongs to the Martyrs, yet did the Confessors fight manfully for the glory of his name and the spreading of his Kingdom. The palm is not in their hands, but they are crowned with the crown of justice, and Jesus, who gave it to them, has made it be part of his own glory that they should be near his throne.

The Church would therefore grace this glorious Christmas Octave with the name of one of her children, who should represent at Bethlehem the whole class of her unmartyred Saints. She chose a Confessor—St Sylvester: a Confessor who governed the Church of Rome, and therefore the universal Church; a Pontiff whose reign was long and peaceful; a Servant of Jesus Christ adorned with every virtue, who was sent to edify and guide the world immediately after those fearful combats that had lasted for three hundred years, in which millions of Christians had gained victory by martyrdom, under the leadership of thirty Popes—predecessors of St Sylvester—and they, too, all Martyrs.

So that Sylvester is messenger of the Peace which Christ came to give to the world, of which the Angels sang on Christmas Night. He is the friend of Constantine; he confirms the Council of Nicæa; he organizes the discipline of the Church for the new era on which she is now entering: the era of Peace. His predecessors in the See of Peter imaged Jesus in his sufferings; Sylvester represented Jesus in his triumph. His appearance during this Octave reminds us that the Divine Child who lies wrapped in swaddling-clothes, and is the object of Herod’s persecution, is, notwithstanding all these humiliations, the Prince of Peace, the Father of the world to come.[1]

https://fsspatl.com/liturgical-year/505-sanctoral-cycle/december/3418-december-31-st-sylvester-pope-and-confessor

Nativity of Our Lord Jesus Christ

Laudetur Iesus Christus and a blessed vigil of the Nativity of Our Lord Jesus Christ! Sunday is the commemoration of the most important day in the history of the universe – after four thousand years of sin and darkness, the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us (John 1:14). As the Christmas season is just mere hours away, we share the following updates:

Christmas Latin Mass Schedule – Feast of the Nativity Sunday December 25

Midnight Latin Masses

Christmas Day Latin Masses

  • 11:30am – St. Thomas Aquinas
  • 1pm – Our Lady of Grace, Greensboro
  • 1pm – Our Lady of the Lake, Chapin, SC (2 hours south of Charlotte)
  • All other parishes: Please check the parish bulletin or call ahead to confirm.

**IMPORTANT SCHEDULING NOTE: There will not be a 12:30pm Latin Mass at St. Ann parish on Christmas Day – only Midnight Mass**

Christmas Week Schedule Changes (as announced)

  • Thursday December 29, St. Thomas Aquinas, 10am Latin Mass (the 7pm Latin Mass is canceled for this day only)
  • All other Latin Masses in Charlotte are on normal schedule unless otherwise announced.  Please check the bulletins to confirm.

To see the January 1 and Epiphany schedule as announced, please our Mass times webpage: https://charlottelatinmass.org/mass-times/

Traditional Christmas Proclamation

St. Ann and St. Thomas Aquinas parishes traditionally chant the ancient Christmas proclamation at Midnight Mass each Christmas (it occurs a minute or two before Mass begins). This is a beautiful chant that was unfortunately lost after 1960s, only to return in a weaker modernized format in 1994. Graciously, the scholas at St. Ann and St. Thomas Aquinas sign the traditional Christmas proclamation. Here are links to compare the traditional and the modern:

The 3 Masses of Christmas

As Christmas approaches, in the 1962 Missal there are 3 Latin Masses for Christmas: Midnight, Dawn, and Day. Each represent the three-fold Nativity of Christ and the Masses are all connected to each other, becoming a sort of a triduum (like Easter) or a trilogy.  Priests are also allowed to offer three Masses to commemorate the birth of Our Savior. The first Mass is midnight, which marks Christ coming into the dark world at Bethlehem on December 25, 1 B.C.; Mass at dawn symbolizes the spiritual birth of Christ in our souls and Mass during the day represents eternal love of Christ for coming to us in the Incarnation.   

We provide some great information from Fisheaters.com and a 2016 talk given by Fr. Innocent Smith, OP of New York who based it off of St. Thomas Aquinas’ writings.  The 3 Masses are:

Midnight Mass: “The Angels’” Mass, symbolizing Christ’s eternal birth, which takes place before creation, hidden from Men. Thus Mass is offered in the hidden darkness at Midnight.  According to tradition, Christ was born at Midnight.

Mass at Dawn: “The Shepherds’” Mass, symbolizing the spiritual birth of Christ into our hearts, where He, the Sun, is like “the morning star that rise in your hearts” (2 Peter 1:19). Thus typically Mass is offered at dawn or early morning when daylight is breaking. The text of Mass focuses on the coming light of Christ that will shine on mankind.

Mass at Day: “The Kings’” Mass, symbolizing the temporal and bodily nativity of Christ, which He processes to us in a visible and bodily form, having put on the flesh. Thus Mass is offered in full daylight as He is now fully visible to men.  The text of Mass (at least the Introit) focuses on Christ’s humanity.  (N.B. Others like liturgist Dom Gueranger have a different order of the 3 Masses than St. Thomas)

The FSSP Latin Mass parish in Atlanta, also shared this 1920 article of the 3 Masses:  https://www.dominicanajournal.org/wp-content/files/old-journal-archive/vol5/no3/dominicanav5n3threemasseschristmasday.pdf

To learn more about the traditional customs surrounding Christmas please visit: https://www.fisheaters.com/customschristmas1.html and https://www.fisheaters.com/customschristmas2.html

The Three Universal “Peaces”

Christ was born on December 25, 1 B.C., during the great Pax Romana (Roman Peace), when the world was at peace and there was no war in the Roman Empire. Fr. William Rock, FSSP, wrote a helpful article explaining what this Roman Peace meant for those living under the Roman Empire during those days:

Yet the Pax Romana was but one of the three periods in human history where there is a universal peace.  Dom Prosper Gueranger noted in The Liturgical Year (on the feast of St. Ambrose, December 7), that St. Bonaventure taught that tradition holds there are three periods of time where the world will be at peace (the 3 silences). The first was after the Noe’s flood subsided when all of humanity was wiped out (except Noe’s family); the 2nd was as noted above, during the birth of Christ (Pax Romana); and the 3rd shall be in the last days after the defeat of the anti-Christ. Gueranger writes:

Let us consider that last visible preparation for the coming of the Messias: a universal peace. The din of war is silenced, and the entire world is intent in expectation. ‘There are three silences to be considered,’ says St. Bonaventure, in one of his sermons for Advent; ‘the first in the days of Noah, after the deluge had destroyed all sinners; the second, in the days of Cæsar Augustus, when all nations were subjected to the empire; the third will be at the death of Antichrist, when the Jews shall be converted.’ O Jesus! Prince of peace, Thou wiliest that the world shall be in peace, when Thou art coming down to dwell in it. Thou didst foretell this by the psalmist, Thy ancestor in the flesh, who, speaking of Thee, said: ‘He shall make wars to cease even to the end of the earth, He shall destroy the bow, and break the weapons; and the shield He shall bum in the fire.’[3] And why is this, O Jesus? It is, that hearts which Thou art to visit must be silent and attentive. It is that before Thou enterest a soul, Thou troublest it in Thy great mercy, as the world was troubled and agitated before the universal peace; then Thou bringest peace into that soul, and Thou takest possession of her. Oh! come quickly, dear Lord, subdue our rebellious senses, bring low the haughtiness of our spirit, crucify our flesh, rouse our hearts from their sleep: and then may Thy entrance into our souls be a feast-day of triumph, as when a conqueror enters a city which he has taken after a long siege. Sweet Jesus, Prince of peace! give us peace; fix Thy kingdom so firmly in our hearts, that Thou mayst reign in us for ever.

Don’t Stop Celebrating: After Christmas Day, Christmas continues

While the secular world prepares to take down the Christmas trees this week, the Church is only beginning to celebrate the Christmas season, all the way until February 2nd. As an annual custom, we share this excellent article by Dr. Peter Kwasniewski on the importance of celebrating Christmas for the next 40 days: https://www.lifesitenews.com/blogs/dont-stop-celebrating-after-christmas-day-christmas-continues-2/

Christmas Reflections by Dom Prosper Gueranger

As we close this Christmas update, we note that an entire month could probably be devoted to the beautiful Christmas reflections offered by the great 19th century Benedictine liturgist, Dom Prosper Gueranger. We conclude with his reflection from the Aurora Mass (Mass at dawn), and the Shepherds’ visit to the crib of Christ:

See, then, how, at this very hour, Shepherds are told by the Angels to go to Bethlehem, and how they hasten thither. With great eagerness they enter the Stable, which is scarcely large enough to hold them. Obedient to the warning received from heaven, they are come to see the Saviour, who, they have been told, has been born unto them. They find all things just as the Angels had said. Who could tell the joy of their hearts, and the simplicity of their faith? They are not surprised to find, in the midst of poverty greater even than their own, him whose Birth has made the very Angels exult. They find no difficulty in acknowledging the wonderful mystery; they adore, they love, the Babe that lies there before them. They are at once Christians, and the Christian Church begins in them; the mystery of a God humbled for man finds faith in these humble souls. Herod will plot the death of this Babe; the Synagogue will rage; the Scribes and Doctors will league together against the Lord and his Christ; they will put this Saviour of Israel to death; but the faith of the Shepherds will not be shaken, and will find imitators in the wise and powerful ones of this world, who will come at last, and bow down their reason to the Crib and the Cross.

What is it that has come over these poor Shepherds? Christ has been born in their hearts; he dwells in them by faith and love. They are our Fathers in the Church. They are our Models. Let us imitate them, and invite the Divine Infant to come into our souls, which we will so prepare for him, that he may find nothing to prevent his entering. It is for our sakes also that the Angels speak; it is to us also that they tell the glad tidings; for the Mystery that has been accomplished this Night is too grand to have the pastoral slopes of Bethlehem for its limits. In order to honour the silent coming of the Saviour into the souls of men, the Priest is preparing to go to the altar, and a second time to offer the spotless Lamb to the Father who hath sent him.

As the Shepherds fixed their eyes on the Crib, so let ours be on the Altar, where we are soon to behold the same Jesus, hidden under appearances that are humbler even than the swathing-bands. These rustic swains enter into the Cave, not yet knowing him, whom they are going to see; but their hearts are quite ready for the revelation. Suddenly they see the Infant; and as they gaze upon him in speechless wondering, Jesus looks at them from his Crib, and smiles upon them: they are changed men, full of light, and the Sun of Justice has made Day in their souls. It is to be the same with us: the words of the Prince of the Apostles are to be verified in us: the Light that shineth in a dark place, has been our one desire and attention; now the Day will dawn, and the Day-Star arise in our hearts.[1]

On behalf of the CLMC, we wish our readers a Merry Christmas.

Feast of St. Thomas the Apostle Update

Laudetur Iesus Christus and blessed feast of St. Thomas the Apostle! He was one of the greatest missionaries in the Church, who evangelized Mesopotamia and Iran, and most notably India (and beyond). Please see the end of this update to learn more about this apostle and why his feast day falls right before Christmas.

Latin Masses This Week

***Please note, contrary to the St. Ann bulletin, Fr. Reid announced last Sunday there will be a 7am Latin Mass this Friday December 23.***

  • Wednesday December 21, 6pm – St. Ann parish, feast of St. Thomas the Apostle
  • Thursday December 22, 7pm – St. Thomas Aquinas, Greater Feria of Advent (no feast day)
  • Friday December 23, 7am (St. Ann) and 12:30pm (St. Mark), Greater Feria of Advent (no feast day)
  • Saturday December 24 – The fourth Saturday Respect Life Latin Mass is canceled due to Christmas

Learn more about the O’ Antiphons which are chanted from December 17 – 24: https://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2022/12/the-o-antiphons-history-theology-and.html

Christmas Latin Mass Schedule – Feast of the Nativity Sunday December 25

Christmas has 3 distinct Masses for the day, and priests are also allowed to offer 3 Masses to commemorate the birth of Our Savior. The first Mass is midnight, which marks Christ coming into the dark world at Bethlehem on December 25, 1 B.C.; Mass at dawn symbolizes the spiritual birth of Christ in our souls and Mass during the day represents eternal love of Christ for coming to us in the Incarnation.   To learn more about the traditional customs surrounding Christmas please visit: https://www.fisheaters.com/customschristmas1.html and https://www.fisheaters.com/customschristmas2.html

Midnight Latin Masses:

Christmas Day Latin Masses

  • 11:30am – St. Thomas Aquinas
  • 1pm – Our Lady of Grace, Greensboro
  • 1pm – Our Lady of the Lake, Chapin, SC (2 hours south of Charlotte)
  • All other parishes: Please check the parish bulletin or call ahead to confirm.

**IMPORTANT SCHEDULING NOTE: There will not be a 12:30pm Latin Mass at St. Ann parish on Christmas Day – only Midnight Mass**

Dec. 23/24 – Fasting and Abstinence Note

Traditionally, Christmas Eve (the feast of Ss. Adam & Eve) was a day of fasting and abstinence, however that has been eliminated by the current code of canon law. However, for those who want to maintain this practice as a pious devotion, we share that in 1959, Pope St. John XXIII allowed the Christmas Eve fast/abstinence to be transferred to December 23. Hence if you’d like to follow this old practice, you are welcome to practice it on December 23 instead of the 24th. To learn more visit: https://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2011/12/anticipation-of-christmas-fast-to.html

December 21 – Feast of St. Thomas the Apostle

Wednesday December 21 is the traditional feast of St. Thomas the Apostle, who often gets overlooked due to the seemingly busy liturgical schedule (Marian feasts, Ember Days, etc.) and preparations for Christmas. Yet this saint is not the least by any means, as tradition holds that St. Thomas evangelized not only India, but Persia including baptizing the 3 Magi; and also much of the globe, and also – including the western hemisphere. Regarding India, according to Catholic historian Dr. Warren Carroll (founder of Christendom College), St. Thomas was among the greatest missionaries of the apostles, and his work evangelizing the south of India (of which the records are now lost) “may be the greatest lost epic in the history of the Church.”  – Dr. Warren Carroll, The Founding of Christendom Vol. I

As custom each December 21, we share with you a great sermon by a traditional priest on this great saint: https://charlottelatinmass.files.wordpress.com/2022/12/20051218-saint-thomas-the-apostle-preaching-the-gospel-to-the-new-world.mp3

Dom Prosper Gueranger also has a reflection and notes that St. Thomas is placed on the calendar right before Christmas to help increase our faith in the Word Made Flesh, which he doubted after the resurrection:

This is the last feast the Church keeps before the great one of the Nativity of her Lord and Spouse. She interrupts the greater ferias in order to pay her tribute of honour to Thomas, the apostle of Christ, whose glorious martyrdom has consecrated this twenty-first day of December, and has procured for the Christian people a powerful patron, who will introduce them to the divine Babe of Bethlehem. To none of the apostles could this day have been so fittingly assigned as to St. Thomas. It was St. Thomas whom we needed; St. Thomas, whose festal patronage would aid us to believe and hope in that God whom we see not, and who comes to us in silence and humility in order to try our faith. St. Thomas was once guilty of doubting, when he ought to have believed, and learnt the necessity of faith only by the sad experience of incredulity: he comes then most appropriately to defend us, by the power of his example and prayers, against the temptations which proud human reason might excite within us.

Let us pray to him with confidence. In that heaven of light and vision, where his repentance and love have placed him, he will intercede for us, and gain for us that docility of mind and heart, which will enable us to see and recognize Him, who is the Expected of nations, and who, though the King of the world, will give no other signs of His majesty, than the swaddling-clothes and tears of a Babe.

https://fsspatl.com/liturgical-year/505-sanctoral-cycle/december/3032-december-21-saint-thomas-apostle

Fourth Sunday of Advent

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Sunday is the fourth Sunday of Advent, and as custom we provide a reflection the Collect from Sunday’s Latin Mass: http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2020/12/the-indulgent-collect-of-fourth-sunday.html

St. Ann Annual Blessing of Religious Objects – Sunday December 18

After today’s 12:30pm St. Ann parish Latin Mass on Sunday December 18, Father will bless religious objects in the Traditional Rite. These items can be, statues, holy water, salt, oil, medals, Rosaries. A table will be placed in the cry room – please place items on table prior to the 12:30pm Mass. Immediately after Mass, Father will begin blessing – new objects cannot be placed on the table after that point. Table should be up by 12 noon – 12:15pm.

Advent Mission with FSSP Recap

We thank everyone who made the sacrifice in the dark and rainy weather to attend St. Thomas Aquinas’ parish mission with the two Fraternity of St. Peter (FSSP) priests, and hope attendees derived benefit from their talks. Please consider thanking Fr. Codd for arranging for this retreat which was a welcome spiritual retreat for all parishioners, but especially for the Latin Mass faithful.

Latin Masses This Week

  • Wednesday December 21, 6pm – St. Ann parish, feast of St. Thomas the Apostle
  • Thursday December 22, 7pm – St. Thomas Aquinas, Greater Feria of Advent (no feast day)
  • Friday December 23, 7am (St. Ann) and 12:30pm (St. Mark), Greater Feria of Advent (no feast day)
  • Saturday December 24 – The fourth Saturday Respect Life Latin Mass is canceled due to Christmas

Christmas Latin Mass Schedule – Feast of the Nativity Sunday December 25

Christmas has 3 distinct Masses for the day, and priests are also allowed to offer 3 Masses to commemorate the birth of Our Savior. The first Mass is midnight, which marks Christ coming into the dark world at Bethlehem on December 25, 1 B.C.; Mass at dawn symbolizes the spiritual birth of Christ in our souls and Mass during the day represents eternal love of Christ for coming to us in the Incarnation.   To learn more about the traditional customs surrounding Christmas please visit: https://www.fisheaters.com/customschristmas1.html and https://www.fisheaters.com/customschristmas2.html

Midnight Latin Masses:

Christmas Day Latin Masses

  • 11:30am – St. Thomas Aquinas
  • 1pm – Our Lady of Grace, Greensboro
  • 1pm – Our Lady of the Lake, Chapin, SC (2 hours south of Charlotte)
  • All other parishes: Please check the parish bulletin or call ahead to confirm.

**IMPORTANT SCHEDULING NOTE: There will not be a 12:30pm Latin Mass at St. Ann parish on Christmas Day – only Midnight Mass**

Christmas Week Schedule Changes (as announced)

  • Thursday December 29, St. Thomas Aquinas, 10am Latin Mass (the 7pm Latin Mass is canceled for this day only)
  • All other Latin Masses are on normal schedule unless otherwise announced.

To see the January 1 and Epiphany schedule as announced, please our Mass times webpage: https://charlottelatinmass.org/mass-times/

Dec. 23/24 – Fasting and Abstinence Note

Traditionally, Christmas Eve (the feast of Ss. Adam & Eve) was a day of fasting and abstinence, however that has been eliminated by the current code of canon law. However, for those who want to maintain this practice as a pious devotion, we share that in 1959, Pope St. John XXIII allowed the Christmas Eve fast/abstinence to be transferred to December 23. Hence if you’d like to follow this old practice, you are welcome to practice it on December 23 instead of the 24th. To learn more visit: https://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2011/12/anticipation-of-christmas-fast-to.html

Traditional Christmas Proclamation

St. Ann and St. Thomas Aquinas parishes traditionally chant the ancient Christmas proclamation at Midnight Mass each Christmas (it occurs a minute or two before Mass begins). This is a beautiful chant that was unfortunately lost after 1960s, only to return in a weaker modernized format in 1994. Graciously, the scholas at St. Ann and St. Thomas Aquinas sign the traditional Christmas proclamation. Here are links to compare the traditional and the modern:

Dom Prosper Gueranger’s Reflection for the Fourth Sunday of Advent

We have now entered into the week which immediately precedes the birth of the Messias. That long desired coming might be even tomorrow; and at furthest, that is, when Advent is as long as it can be, the beautiful feast is only seven days from us. So that the Church now counts the hours; she watches day and night, and since December 17 her Offices have assumed an unusual solemnity. At Lauds, she varies the antiphons each day; and at Vespers, in order to express the impatience of her desires for her Jesus, she makes use of the most vehement exclamations to the Messias, in which she each day gives Him a magnificent title, borrowed from the language of the prophets.

Today, she makes a last effort to stir up the devotion of her children. She leads them to the desert; she shows them John the Baptist, upon whose mission she instructed them on the third Sunday. The voice of the austere Precursor resounds through the wilderness, and penetrates even into the cities. It preaches penance, and the obligation men are under of preparing by self-purification for the coming of Christ. Let us retire from the world during these next few days; or if that may not be by reason of our external duties, let us retire into the quiet of our own hearts and confess our iniquities, as did those true Israelites, who came, full of compunction and of faith in the Messias, to the Baptist, there to make perfect their preparation for worthily receiving the Redeemer on the day of His appearing to the world.

Community News

  • Second Fr. Ripperger Talk Added For Friday March 10: Due to the overwhelming interest in hearing exorcist and traditional theologian, Fr. Chad Ripperger, St. Thomas Aquinas parish is now hosting a second, identical talk, by Fr Ripperger on Friday March 10. Please see the parish’s note:

    Due to the Saturday, March 11, 2023 event filling up so quickly, Fr. Codd asked Fr. Ripperger if he would be willing to come on Friday, March 10, 2023, to do an additional identical conference, in order to allow for more parishioners and folks from the diocese to attend.  Fr. Ripperger graciously agreed, and so we will now have him speak both on Friday and Saturday.  Note, these will be the same talk on both days.  Saturday is already full.  If you are signed up already to attend Saturday, please do not register for Friday as well, or we will delete your registration.  Please register as soon as possible in order to help us with planning.  As well, if you are able to help support us bringing Fr. Ripperger in for an additional talk, please use the registration form to do so, or use this link.  Thank you! https://www.osvhub.com/st-thomas-aquinas-rc-church/forms/frripperger-friday
  • Holy Face Devotions
  • St. Mark – Mondays 2-2:45pm
  • St. Thomas Aquinas – Tuesdays 6am in the main church
  • St. Ann – Tuesdays 7:30am in the chapel after the Novus Ordo Mass (uses the booklet/chaplet which takes 15-20 minutes)
  • St. Michael the Archangel, Gastonia – Tuesdays, 9am, Main Church (**NEW TIME & LOCATION**)
  • Holy Spirit, Denver – Tuesdays 10-11am after the Novus Ordo Mass

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • Ember Days for the Beginning of Winter – Article by Michael Charlier: This past week was the winter Embertide, the three days of penance at the start of each liturgical and natural season to thank God for the gifts of creation and to pray for holiness in the upcoming season. Here is a brief overview of the winter Ember days: https://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2022/12/ember-days-for-beginning-of-winter.html
  • The Demanding Glory of Advent’s Ember Saturday: Next to the vigils of Easter, Pentecost, and All Hallows Eve, if there is a sublime and somber Latin Mass, it is any one of the Ember Saturday Masses – especially Ember Saturday in Advent (yesterday). The Mass features six readings, mainly from the Old Testament and offers a glorious way to conclude the Ember week and prepare for the Nativity. Dr. Peter Kwasniewski (who visited us last September), pens an excellent article on this special liturgy: https://onepeterfive.com/glory-advents-ember-saturday/  Additionally, we note that Dr. Kwasniewski is also promoting a second article by German writer Michael Charlier, https://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2022/12/the-liturgy-of-ember-saturday-in-advent.html
  • The Golden Mass of Ember Wednesday: Not to be outdone, but Ember Wednesday in Advent is also a special liturgy as Greg DiPippo (who served along with Dr. Kwasniewski on our panel discussion in September) writes in the New Liturgical Movement. We share this article and those above to help draw our readers to the importance of the Ember days and encourage people to take advantage of them as we progress in the liturgical year. https://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2022/12/the-golden-mass-of-ember-wednesday.html#.Y56oPhXMKHt
  • Yes, Our Lord Meant Exactly What He Said About Divorce: As the Church prepares to meditate on the Holy Family in the weeks ahead, we are pleased to share another article from Nathaniel Slattery, one of the leaders of the High Country Latin Mass Community in Boone. Mr. Slattery takes a look at that often ignored traditional teaching of the Church which condemns divorce. In the age of widespread annulment abuses, the article backs up this foundational teaching through the writings of the saints: https://www.catholic365.com/article/24551/yes-our-lord-meant-exactly-what-he-said-about-divorce.html
  • Reform of the Reform: Liturgical Russian Roulette: Occasionally, some sacred liturgy enthusiasts, or more likely, conservative Catholics, become excited about priests who wish to make the Novus Ordo Mass more reverent, by adding Latin, chant, and communion kneelers (among other things). This is called “Reform of the Reform”, to reform the Vatican II Novus Ordo Mass to make it more “traditional”. While chant and communion kneelers, etc. at a Novus Ordo Mass are laudable acts, there is a fundamental flaw in this effort – it is entirely priest dependent, and more often than not, the priest gets transferred at some point, and the new pastor reverts the liturgy back to where it was before. As the author notes, it’s like playing liturgical Russian roulette:

[E]ventually this cassock wearing priest will be replaced by someone more modern. His replacement will go get rid of ad orientem and phase out the Latin. The choir members will get disgruntled and quit. There will be a rift between the new pastor and the parishioners who want to retain the traditional stuff. The pastor will be intransigent; the parishioners, unhappy with him, will leave. With these people gone, the new priest will undo all the traditional stuff the previous priest put in place. The parish will again reach equilibrium as a generic western Novus Ordo parish. The conservative parishioners-in-exile, meanwhile, will relocate to whatever the most traditional option remains among the diocesan parishes. Seeing the influx of new traditional parishioners, that pastor will feel emboldened to introduce more traditional elements into his masses. The whole process will begin again.

But it’s never a net gain. In fact, the total number of reform of the reform parishioners in the diocesan system will go down because each time this upheaval happens, a fraction inevitably say “I’m done with this; I’m just going to an Institute/Fraternity/Society parish” and they remove themselves from the diocesan system entirely. So nobody ever wins. It’s generally just shuffling parishioners, a diocesan shell-game. The snake just eats its own tail.

CLMC note: This is why the stability of the Latin Mass is preferred over the reverent “reformed” Novus Ordo Mass – the Latin Mass is not priest dependent for its reverence. However, the CLMC would go one step further and say, a Latin Mass in a Novus Ordo parish also suffers from being “priest dependent” as we have seen in the diocese over the past 10 years where several Traditional Latin Masses were canceled or curtailed when there was a change in pastors.  Naturally, this is also in part why the CLMC continues to advocate for a dedicated Latin Mass chapel – the current priest-dependent framework always remains unstable.

CLMC note: Has the Charlotte Diocese – and even parishes within it that offer the Latin Mass – been affected by this problem?

The (British) Bells of St. Mary’s: An American Finds Home on an English Street

On the topic of coming back home, we share an excellent piece from another local writer from our community, Rachel Shrader, who attends Latin Mass at St. Ann parish, and writes a sequel to her first article about her summer trip to the British isles where she visits different Latin Mass parishes. In this installment, Ms. Shrader visits the Fraternity of St. Peter (FSSP) parish, St. Mary’s Shrine in Warrington, UK, and reflects on the importance of having not just a home parish, but a parish that is actually one’s home, like Nazareth. This certainly fits well with many Latin Mass families who desire to find that permanent home where both the sacraments and communal life are offered daily. Yet regardless, the issues raised in the article should apply to any parish especially if they have lost parishioners during COVID (as noted in the above article). We also note the timeliness of the article as it comes between the feast of the House of Loretto (December 10) and the feast of the Nativity, at Bethlehem (December 25), both home to the Holy Family.  

We share a few excerpts to close this update (emphasis ours):

St. Mary’s Church was served by the Benedictines of Ampleforth Abbey in Yorkshire for 135 years before they were forced to relinquish care of it in 2012 due to the lack of available priests. The Archdiocese of Liverpool took over its administration for a few years.

Then, in 2015, Archbishop Malcom McMahon made an announcement that must have been music to the ears of those who loved St. Mary’s. He announced that St. Mary’s Church would be entrusted to the care of the Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter, also known by their abbreviation FSSP, a group founded by Pope St. John Paul II in 1988.  The church was designated a “shrine” church, which basically means that it is a center of worship with a community, but not technically a parish.

St. Mary’s in Warrington is, of course, more than just a building, though a celestial building it is. This place strives to be a center of life for the Catholics that it serves, to epitomize the ideal of parish life.

Once upon a time, entire towns and communities centered around the parish church. St. Mary’s is aiming to bring that ideal back: in its own words, it aims to build a “Nazareth in Lancashire,” a place where families can live, grow, and worship together.

Our parish is a microcosm of Holy Mother Church, and it is there that our spiritual fathers—our pastors—instruct and guide us; where we and our brothers and sisters in Christ support and sustain one another. Our parish gives us our daily spiritual sustenance: the Holy Eucharist, offered through the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass every day. There we are instructed in the Faith, receive the other sacraments, marry, and welcome new members into the Church. But an ideal parish life goes even further.

What if your parish was the place you went to school, met your friends, and recreated? What if it was home base and not merely a weekly or biweekly item on your agenda? What if you wanted to be there—to actually be there, and not just go there? What if—now I’m really going out on a limb—you loved it so much you wanted to do something for it, contribute to it, just like we do with our physical households?

What if it…felt like home?

Next Sunday is Christmas. What liturgical home will you be visiting on Our Lord’s Nativity?

Advent Mission Time Change Tonight & Wednesday

Laudetur Iesus Christus and blessed feast of St. Lucy. The Advent Mission at St. Thomas Aquinas parish tonight and tomorrow will start 30 minutes later than previously advertised. The customized talks (men, and youth) begin at 6:30pm (not 6pm), and the general talk begins at 7:30pm (not 7pm).

Tonight’s men’s talk will be in Parish Office Room D. The main mission talk at 7:30pm will be in the church. Confessions begin at 6pm each night.

These changes work well especially for tomorrow as one can attend the Ember Wednesday Latin Mass at 6pm St. Ann and still make it for the general talk at St. Thomas Aquinas. Please see the updated schedule below.

God Bless,

Charlotte Latin Mass Community

www.charlottelatinmass.org

=============

As you may recall, the parish has graciously invited two Fraternity of St. Peter (FSSP) priests to give a special Advent parish mission from Tuesday December 13 – Thursday December 15. The schedule will feature a mission talk as well as confessions each evening. Additionally as a bonus, each night before the mission, the priests will give a customized talk on separate nights for men, youth, and women. We can’t express enough the blessing of having these priests – who offer the Latin Mass exclusively – to give a mission and a few talks. We encourage everyone to take advantage of this wonderful event.

The mission priests are Fr. Joseph Portzer, FSSP, and Fr. Martin Adams, FSSP.

The schedule is as follows:

*** Confessions each night at 6pm ***

Tuesday December 13

6:30pm – Men’s Talk

7:30pm – Mission (open to all)

Wednesday December 14

6:30pm – Youth Talk (suited for high school age youth – parents discretion)

7:30pm – Mission (open to all)

Thursday December 15

6pm – Women’s Talk

7pm – Latin Mass (open to all)

8pm – Mission (open to all)

For those new to the Latin Mass, the Fraternity of St Peter is a congregation of priests who offer the Latin Mass exclusively and staff chapels and parishes throughout North America and the world. Two members of our community and St. Ann parish are enrolled in the FSSP seminary in Nebraska. In prior years, the CLMC has hosted FSSP priests to give talks.  We are grateful St. Thomas Aquinas parish for offering this timely mission and also a wonderful opportunity to better acquaint us with the charism of the FSSP priests.

In closing, if there is one liturgical season often overlooked, it is often Advent – eclipsed by the secular world of materialism, and yet this week we have a wonderful opportunity to reestablish our spiritual lives in this important season through this Advent mission. We encourage everyone to attend and hope to see you there!

Advent Mission with FSSP Priests – Begins Tomorrow December 13-15 (St. Thomas Aquinas)

Laudetur Iesus Christus and blessed feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe! Just a reminder that tomorrow Tuesday December 13 begins the important Advent mission at St. Thomas Aquinas parish that you won’t want to miss.

As you may recall, the parish has graciously invited two Fraternity of St. Peter (FSSP) priests to give a special Advent parish mission from Tuesday December 13 – Thursday December 15. The schedule will feature a mission talk as well as confessions each evening. Additionally as a bonus, each night before the mission, the priests will give a customized talk on separate nights for men, youth, and women. We can’t express enough the blessing of having these priests – who offer the Latin Mass exclusively – to give a mission and a few talks. We encourage everyone to take advantage of this wonderful event.

The mission priests are Fr. Joseph Portzer, FSSP, and Fr. Martin Adams, FSSP.

The schedule is as follows:

Tuesday December 13

6pm – Men’s Talk

7pm – Mission (open to all)

Wednesday December 14

6pm – Youth Talk (suited for high school age youth – parents discretion)

7pm – Mission (open to all)

Thursday December 15

6pm – Women’s Talk

7pm – Latin Mass (open to all)

8pm – Mission (open to all)

For those new to the Latin Mass, the Fraternity of St Peter is a congregation of priests who offer the Latin Mass exclusively and staff chapels and parishes throughout North America and the world. Two members of our community and St. Ann parish are enrolled in the FSSP seminary in Nebraska. In prior years, the CLMC has hosted FSSP priests to give talks.  We are grateful St. Thomas Aquinas parish for offering this timely mission and also a wonderful opportunity to better acquaint us with the charism of the FSSP priests.

In closing, if there is one liturgical season often overlooked, it is often Advent – eclipsed by the secular world of materialism, and yet this week we have a wonderful opportunity to reestablish our spiritual lives in this important season through this Advent mission. We encourage everyone to attend and hope to see you there!

Third Sunday of Advent (Gaudete Sunday)

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Sunday the Church celebrates the 3rd Sunday in Advent, otherwise known as Gaudete Sunday, taken from the first words of the Introit (rejoice). The priest wears Rose colored vestments to indicate hope during this penitential time that Christ in His Incarnation is coming. We share a commentary on Sunday’s Collect: http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2020/12/the-accommodating-collect-of-third.html

Fisheaters.com – Gaudete Sunday: https://www.fisheaterscom/customsadvent13.html

December 13-15: Advent Mission with Fraternity of St. Peter (FSSP) Priests (St. Thomas Aquinas parish)

St. Thomas Aquinas Parish has invited priests from the Fraternity of St. Peter (FSSP) to offer an Advent mission this week from Tuesday evenings December 13 – Thursday December 15. The schedule will feature a mission talk as well as confessions each evening. Additionally as a bonus, each night before the mission, the priests will give a customized talk on separate nights for men, youth, and women. We can’t express enough the blessing of having these priests – who offer the Latin Mass exclusively – to give a mission and a few talks. We encourage everyone to take advantage of this wonderful event. The mission priests are Fr Joseph Portzer, FSSP, and Fr. Martin Adams, FSSP. The schedule is as follows:

Tuesday December 13

6pm – Men’s Talk

7pm – Mission (open to all)

Wednesday December 14

6pm – Youth Talk (suited for high school age youth – parents discretion)

7pm – Mission (open to all)

Thursday December 15

6pm – Women’s Talk

7pm – Latin Mass (open to all)

8pm – Mission (open to all)

Advent Embertide this week

This coming Wednesday, Friday and Saturday are the seasonal ember days – when the traditional Church sets aside 3 days each season for prayer, fasting and partial abstinence (*now voluntary) to thank God for his gifts of creation and to use them in moderation. It’s a good time to also pray for sanctity for the upcoming season. Fisheaters has more commentary here: https://www.fisheaters.com/customsadvent11.html  

Ember Week Masses:

  • Wednesday December 14, 6pm – St. Ann, 6pm (Low) – *Fasting/Partial Abstinence (meat at primary meal)
  • Thursday December 15, 7pm – St. Thomas Aquinas, Feria (Not an Ember Day, no fasting nor abstinence)
  • Friday December 16, 7am (St. Ann) & 12:30pm (St. Mark), Commemoration of St. Eusebius – *Fasting/Abstinence (no meat)
  • Saturday December 17: None scheduled diocesan parishes in/near Charlotte, sadly (see Rorate schedule) – *Fasting/Partial Abstinence (meat at primary meal)

Upcoming Rorate Latin Masses

  • Saturday December 17, 6am – Our Lady of Grace, Greensboro (1.5 hours north of Charlotte)
  • Saturday December 17, 6:30am – Prince of Peace, Taylors, SC (2 hours southwest of Charlotte)

St. Ann Annual Blessing of Religious Objects – Sunday December 18

After the 12:30pm St. Ann parish Latin Mass on Sunday December 18, Father will bless religious objects in the Traditional Rite. These items can be, statues, holy water, salt, oil, medals, Rosaries. A table will be placed in the narthex – please place items on table prior to the 12:30pm Mass. Immediately after Mass, Father will begin blessing – new objects cannot be placed on the table after that point. Table should be up by 12 noon – 12:15pm.

Christmas Latin Mass Schedule – Feast of the Nativity Sunday December 25

Midnight Latin Masses:

Christmas Day Latin Masses

  • 11:30am – St. Thomas Aquinas (Note: There will not be a 12:30pm Latin Mass at St. Ann on Christmas Day)
  • 1pm – Our Lady of Grace, Greensboro
  • 1pm – Our Lady of the Lake, Chapin, SC (2 hours south of Charlotte)
  • All other parishes: Please check the parish bulletin or call ahead to confirm.

Community News

  • Second Fr. Ripperger Talk Added For Friday March 10: Due to the overwhelming interest in hearing exorcist and traditional theologian, Fr. Chad Ripperger, St. Thomas Aquinas parish is now hosting a second, identical talk, by Fr Ripperger on Friday March 10. Please see the parish’s note:

    Due to the Saturday, March 11, 2023 event filling up so quickly, Fr. Codd asked Fr. Ripperger if he would be willing to come on Friday, March 10, 2023, to do an additional identical conference, in order to allow for more parishioners and folks from the diocese to attend.  Fr. Ripperger graciously agreed, and so we will now have him speak both on Friday and Saturday.  Note, these will be the same talk on both days.  Saturday is already full.  If you are signed up already to attend Saturday, please do not register for Friday as well, or we will delete your registration.  Please register as soon as possible in order to help us with planning.  As well, if you are able to help support us bringing Fr. Ripperger in for an additional talk, please use the registration form to do so, or use this link.  Thank you! https://www.osvhub.com/st-thomas-aquinas-rc-church/forms/frripperger-friday
  • Holy Face Devotions
  • St. Mark – Mondays 2-2:45pm
  • St. Thomas Aquinas – Tuesdays 6am in the main church
  • St. Ann – Tuesdays 7:30am in the chapel after the Novus Ordo Mass (uses the booklet/chaplet which takes 15-20 minutes)
  • St. Michael the Archangel, Gastonia – Tuesdays, 6:30-7pm, Holy Family Room
  • Holy Spirit, Denver – Tuesdays 10-11am after the Novus Ordo Mass
  • Don’t see your parish? Why not organize one?

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • “Innumerable miracles”, reduced to none: Saint Nicholas in the Traditional and Modern Roman Missals: St. Nicholas has had many miracles attributed to him during his lifetime, however sadly in recent decades there were changes to the liturgical texts that minimized this important fact. Liturgical writer Matthew Hazell has examined the difference in prayers from the Traditional Rite and the Novus Ordo Missals: https://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2022/12/innumerable-miracles-reduced-to-none.html

Gaudete Sunday – Dom Prosper Gueranger

We close this update with a reflection by the great Benedictine liturgist, Servant of God Dom Prosper Gueranger, who reminds us that the coming of the Savior is approaching on this Gaudete Sunday.

Today, again, the Church is full of joy, and the joy is greater than it was. It is true that her Lord has not come; but she feels that He is nearer than before, and therefore she thinks it just to lessen somewhat the austerity of this penitential season by the innocent cheerfulness of her sacred rites. And first, this Sunday has had the name of Gaudete given to it, from the first word of the Introit; it also is honoured with those impressive exceptions which belong to the fourth Sunday of Lent, called Lœtare. The organ is played at the Mass; the vestments are rose-colour; the deacon resumes the dalmatic, and the subdeacon the tunic; and in cathedral churches the bishop assists with the precious mitre. How touching are all these usages, and how admirable this condescension of the Church, wherewith she so beautifully blends together the unalterable strictness of the dogmas of faith and the graceful poetry of the formulæ of her liturgy! Let us enter into her spirit, and be glad on this third Sunday of her Advent, because our Lord is now so near unto us. To-morrow we will resume our attitude of servants mourning for the absence of their Lord and waiting for Him; for every delay, however short, is painful and makes love sad…

…Nothing is more just than that we rejoice in the Lord. Both the prophet and the apostle excite us to desire the Saviour, both of them promise us peace. Therefore, let us not be solicitous: the Lord is nigh; nigh to His Church, and nigh to each of our souls. Who can be near so burning a fire, and yet be cold? Do we not feel that He is coming to us, in spite of all obstacles? He will let nothing be a barrier between Himself and us, neither His own infinite high majesty, nor our exceeding lowliness, nor our many sins. Yet a little while, and He will be with us. Let us go out to meet Him by these prayers and supplications, and thanksgiving which the apostle recommends to us. Let our zeal to unite ourselves with our holy mother the Church become more than ever fervent: now every day her prayers will increase in intense earnestness, and her longings after Him, who is her light and her love, will grow more ardent.

Today is Gaudete Sunday and the coming of the Lord is nigh. What Mass are you attending Sunday?

Immaculate Conception & Rorate Mass Schedules

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Tomorrow, Thursday December 8th is one of the most important Marian feast days in the Church, and of course our nation’s patronal feast day, the Immaculate Conception. It is a holy day of obligation and below are the Latin Masses listed.  We also have two updates to share.

Bishop Jugis Letter Update: The CLMC wishes to extend our thanks to Fr. Reid for his pulpit announcement on Sunday in which he has reached out to Bishop Jugis to obtain more clarification in His Excellency’s potentially concerning November 17 letter to the CLMC.  We also appreciate Father’s encouraging advice to keep attending the Latin Mass, and keep praying.  If any clarification made, we’re sure it will be shared to the entire community. We also thank everyone who prayed the St. Ann parish Immaculate Heart novena and included the CLMC and Bishop Jugis among the intentions.

Feast of the Immaculate Conception Thursday December 8 – **Holy Day of Obligation & Patronal Feast of the United States**

Thursday is the feast of the Immaculate Conception, the patronal feast day for the United States since 1846. If the U.S. were a Catholic country (which we pray it will be someday), December 8 would be essentially our primary national holiday (not July 4).  Our national shrine in Washington is named after this title of Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception and sits at the highest elevation in U.S. capital city. For more on this splendid feast day visit: https://www.fisheaters.com/customsadvent5.html  

Feast of the Immaculate Conception – Thursday December 8

(More Masses to be announced)

Rorate Latin Masses (Latin Mass by Candlelight at Dawn on a Saturday in Advent)

  • Saturday December 10, 6:30am – St. Ann parish
  • Saturday December 10, 6am – Holy Cross parish in Kernersville (1.5 hours north of Charlotte)
  • Saturday December 10, 6:30am – St. Elizabeth of the Hill Country, Boone (2 hours northwest of Charlotte)
  • Saturday December 10, 6:30am – Prince of Peace, Taylors, SC (2 hours southwest of Charlotte)
  • Saturday December 10, 6:30am – St. Margaret Mary, Swannanoa (2 hours northwest of Charlotte)
  • Saturday December 17, 6am – Our Lady of Grace, Greensboro (1.5 hours north of Charlotte)
  • Saturday December 17, 6:30am – Prince of Peace, Taylors, SC (2 hours southwest of Charlotte)

REMINDER – December 13-15: Advent Mission with Fraternity of St. Peter (FSSP) Priests (St. Thomas Aquinas parish)

Next week St. Thomas Aquinas Parish will host priests from the Fraternity of St. Peter (FSSP) to offer an Advent mission from Tuesday evening December 13 – Thursday December 15. The schedule will feature a mission talk as well as confessions each evening. Additionally as a bonus, each night before the mission, the priests will give a customized talk on separate nights for men, youth, and women. We can’t express enough the blessing of having these priests – who offer the Latin Mass exclusively – to give a mission and a few talks. We encourage everyone to take advantage of this wonderful event. The mission priests are Fr Joseph Portzer, FSSP, and Fr. Martin Adams, FSSP. The schedule is as follows:

Tuesday December 13

6pm – Men’s Talk

7pm – Mission (open to all)

Wednesday December 14

6pm – Youth Talk (suited for high school age youth – parents discretion)

7pm – Mission (open to all)

Thursday December 15

6pm – Women’s Talk

7pm – Latin Mass (open to all)

8pm – Mission (open to all)

Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception, pray for us!

Second Sunday of Advent

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Sunday is the 2nd Sunday of Advent (and the ancient feast of St. Barbara), as custom we share a reflection on the Collect for Sunday’s Latin Mass: https://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2020/12/the-heartfelt-collect-for-second-sunday.html#.YaxSaLpOmHs

First Sunday Announcements:

  • St. Thomas Aquinas: There will not be a 1st Sunday potluck at St. Thomas Aquinas after Latin Mass today due to a scheduling conflict.
  • Sacred Heart Parish Latin Mass Today at 4pm: There will be the regular 1st Sunday Latin Mass at 4pm today, offered by Fr. Noah Carter at Sacred Heart parish in Salisbury. There will be a potluck to follow in Brincefield Hall. For more information please visit: http://salisburylmc.org/

Per the Salisbury Latin Mass Community, there may be a road closure today coming from I-85 toward the parish. They suggest the following below route or follow this map https://goo.gl/maps/A4uUV25f7viKDRjWA)  

•           Drive toward Sacred Heart on Jake Alexander Blvd.

•           Turn right onto Brenner Avenue at the intersection where Wells Fargo bank, Harris Teeter and Aldi grocery stores are located.

•           Drive to Statesville Blvd. and turn left.

•           This will take you back to Jake Alexander Blvd.

•           Turn right at the CVS.

•           This detour should add about 3 minutes to your travel from the Jake Alexander Blvd & Brenner Ave. intersection:

Latin Masses This Week

  • Wednesday December 7, 6pm St. Ann – Feast of St. Ambrose, Bishop and Confessor
  • Thursday December 8 – Feast of the Immaculate Conception (See schedule below)
  • Friday December 9, 7am (St. Ann) & 12:30pm (St. Mark) – Feria Day (no feast day)
  • Saturday December 10 – Feria Day (See Rorate Masses below)

Feast of the Immaculate Conception – **Holy Day of Obligation & Patronal Feast of the United States**

Rorate Latin Masses (Candlelight Latin Masses at dawn on Saturdays)

  • Saturday December 10, 6:30am – St. Ann parish
  • Saturday December 10, 6am – Holy Cross parish in Kernersville (1.5 hours north of Charlotte)
  • Saturday December 10, 6:30am – St. Elizabeth of the Hill Country, Boone (2 hours northwest of Charlotte)
  • Saturday December 10, 6:30am – Prince of Peace, Taylors, SC (2 hours southwest of Charlotte)
  • Saturday December 10, 6:30am – St Margaret Mary, Swannanoa (2 hours northwest of Charlotte)
  • Saturday December 17, 6:30am – Prince of Peace, Taylors, SC (2 hours southwest of Charlotte)

Advent-Christmas Schedule: Please see our webpage for the most recent announced Latin Masses during Advent and Christmas: https://charlottelatinmass.org/mass-times/

December 13-15: Advent Mission with Fraternity of St. Peter (FSSP) Priests (St. Thomas Aquinas parish)

St. Thomas Aquinas Parish has invited priests from the Fraternity of St. Peter (FSSP) to offer an Advent mission from Tuesday evenings December 13 – Thursday December 15. The schedule will feature a mission talk as well as confessions each evening. Additionally as a bonus, each night before the mission, the priests will give a customized talk on separate nights for men, youth, and women. We can’t express enough the blessing of having these priests – who offer the Latin Mass exclusively – to give a mission and a few talks. We encourage everyone to take advantage of this wonderful event. The mission priests are Fr. Joseph Portzer, FSSP, and Fr. Martin Adams, FSSP. The schedule is as follows:

Tuesday December 13

6pm – Men’s Talk

7pm – Mission (open to all)

Wednesday December 14

6pm – Youth Talk (suited for high school age youth – parents discretion)

7pm – Mission (open to all)

Thursday December 15

6pm – Women’s Talk

7pm – Latin Mass (open to all)

8pm – Mission (open to all)

St. Ann Annual Blessing of Religious Objects – Sunday December 18

After the 12:30pm St. Ann parish Latin Mass on Sunday December 18, Father will bless religious objects in the Traditional Rite. More details coming in the week ahead.

Community News

  • Second Fr. Ripperger Talk Added For Friday March 10: Due to the overwhelming interest in hearing exorcist and traditional theologian, Fr. Chad Ripperger, St. Thomas Aquinas parish is now hosting a second, identical talk, by Fr. Ripperger on Friday March 10. Please see the parish’s note:

    Due to the Saturday, March 11, 2023 event filling up so quickly, Fr. Codd asked Fr. Ripperger if he would be willing to come on Friday, March 10, 2023, to do an additional identical conference, in order to allow for more parishioners and folks from the diocese to attend.  Fr. Ripperger graciously agreed, and so we will now have him speak both on Friday and Saturday.  Note, these will be the same talk on both days.  Saturday is already full.  If you are signed up already to attend Saturday, please do not register for Friday as well, or we will delete your registration.  Please register as soon as possible in order to help us with planning.  As well, if you are able to help support us bringing Fr. Ripperger in for an additional talk, please use the registration form to do so, or use this link.  Thank you! https://www.osvhub.com/st-thomas-aquinas-rc-church/forms/frripperger-friday
  • Holy Face Devotions
  • St. Mark – Mondays 2-2:45pm
  • St. Thomas Aquinas – Tuesdays 6am in the main church
  • St. Ann – Tuesdays 7:30am in the chapel after the Novus Ordo Mass (uses the booklet/chaplet which takes 15-20 minutes)
  • St. Michael the Archangel, Gastonia – Tuesdays, 6:30-7pm, Holy Family Room
  • Holy Spirit, Denver – Tuesdays 10-11am after the Novus Ordo Mass
  • Don’t see your parish? Why not organize one? (e-mail us at info@charlottelatinmass.org)

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • St. Junipero Serra Institute: Spanish immersion course for seminarians and clergy, in a traditional environment: The Fraternity of St. Peter (FSSP) in Mexico is offering seminarians and clergy a Spanish immersion course this coming summer that will allow them to learn Spanish in a traditional environment (Latin Mass, chanting of the traditional office, etc.). If you know of any seminarians or clergy interested in Spanish, please share this link: https://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2022/12/st-junipero-serra-institute-spanish.html#more
  • Cardinal Burke’s Advent Reflection: Advent and the Doors of Our Hearts: His Eminence Cardinal Raymond Burke has released (last weekend actually) an Advent reflection which remains timely for the rest of this season, and we note his quoting Dom Prosper Gueranger, the great 19th century Benedictine liturgist, whom is often cited in CLMC updates. https://www.cardinalburke.com/presentations/advent-and-the-door-of-our-hearts

December 4 – Feast of St. Barbara

Today Sunday December 4 is the ancient feast of St. Barbara, virgin and martyr. Sadly her feast day was suppressed in recent years, but this great (and often forgotten saint) is still celebrated in a few ways in the Traditional Latin Mass calendar and she remains one of the 14 Holy Helpers. We post Greg DiPippo’s article about her feast day followed by the great 19th century Benedictine liturgist, Dom Prosper Gueranger’s commentary and reflection on her feast day. DiPippo’s article notes:

Barbara’s father was a wealthy pagan named Dioscorus, who, before going on a long trip, had her enclosed in a tower to hide her extraordinary beauty from the eyes of strangers. Contemplating the splendor and harmony of the world, which she could observe from the tower’s two windows, she began to think about its Cause. In her longing to know the truth about the Creator, she determined to seek the knowledge of Him as the only good in this world, and thus made a vow of virginity…

…Dioscorus, learning upon his return of his daughter’s conversion and refusal to marry, flew into a rage, and attempted to strike her with a sword. In one version of the story, Barbara fled from her father, and as she ran up a hill, was temporarily hidden from him in a cave which miraculously opened on it, whence her patronage of miners. There follow various accounts of the torments to which she was then subjected, her trial before a judge, and her eventual beheading by her own father’s hand. As Dioscorus walked away from the site of the execution, “fire fallen from heaven, by the just vengeance of God, so consumed (him) that there remained of him not even a tiny bit of dust.” From this last detail comes St Barbara’s role as protectress against lightning and thunder, and her patronage of military gunners, etc.

To conclude where the above excerpt ended, we share Gueranger’s note about her patronages:

Such is the account of the life and martyrdom of the courageous virgin of Nicomedia. She is invoked in the Church against lightning, on account of the punishment inflicted by divine justice on her execrable father. This same incident of the saint’s history has suggested several Catholic customs: thus her name is sometimes given to the hold of men-of-war where the ammunition is stowed; she is the patroness of artillery men, miners, etc.; and she is invoked by the faithful against the danger of a sudden death.

St. Barbara, pray for us!

What Mass are you attending Sunday?