Feast of the Annunciation Update

Laudetur Iesus Christus and blessed feast of the Annunciation! Yesterday March 24, was the traditional feast of St. Gabriel the Archangel, which is appropriately placed to herald today’s solemn feast of the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary, spoken by St. Gabriel to the Blessed Mother. To learn more about these twin feast days we include links to Dom Prosper Gueranger’s The Liturgical Year:

March 24 – St. Gabriel the Archangel: https://sensusfidelium.us/the-liturgical-year-dom-prosper-gueranger/march/march-24-st-gabriel-the-archangel/

March 25 – the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary: https://sensusfidelium.us/the-liturgical-year-dom-prosper-gueranger/march/march-25-the-annunciation-of-the-ever-blessed-virgin/

(as noted prior Lenten penances are relaxed on today’s solemnity feast day)

Feast of the Annunciation Latin Masses Today: St. Thomas Aquinas parish will offer a 7pm High Mass this evening for this feast day (as well as 7pm Latin Mass at Our Lady of Grace in Greensboro). A 12pm Low Mass will be offered at Prince of Peace parish, in Taylors, SC (2 hours southwest of Charlotte).

St. Ann Respect Life Latin Mass – this Saturday March 27 8am: This Saturday St. Ann will again host its 4th Saturday Latin Mass for the end of abortion. Low Mass will be at 8am, followed prayers at the Planned Parenthood abortion facility (700 South Torrence, Charlotte), or a Holy Hour of Reparation led by a deacon in the Church.

Holy Week Update

St. Ann will host the 2021 Traditional Easter Triduum (Pre-1955*)

  • Palm Sunday – March 28: 12:30pm Mass (*NOTE: The Palm Sunday Mass will be the 1962 Mass, not Pre-55)
  • Spy Wednesday March 31: 6pm (Low Mass, 1962)
  • Holy Thursday April 1:  7pm – Mass of the Lord’s Supper (Pre-55)
  • Good Friday April 2: 12:00 Noon – Stations of the Cross; 12:00 – 2:00 PM – Confessions; 3:00 PM – Passion of Our Lord Jesus Christ (Pre-55)
  • Holy Saturday April 3: 8:00 PM – Easter Vigil (Pre-55)
  • Easter Sunday April 4:
    • 11:30am High Mass – St. Thomas Aquinas parish: Mass will be accompanied by a string ensemble. The Ordinary of the Mass will be Mass in F by Albrechtsberger (Missa Visitationis Beatae Mariae Virginis). No signups required for Mass.
    • 12:30pm High Mass St. Ann parish
    • All other normal Sunday Latin Masses will be offered at its normal Sunday time.

Triduum update: According to St. Ann parish there will not be signups required for the Triduum; however they will have signups for Easter Sunday. Please check St. Ann parish website. Additional seating should be outside in the plaza. All those desiring to receive Holy Communion will be able to receive on Holy Thursday or Easter Vigil, and presumably Easter Sunday (regardless of signups). As a reminder there is no Holy Communion is offered on Good Friday – the Veneration of the Cross is the “People’s Communion” (see our Pre-55 page below)

What is the Pre-1955 Easter Latin Triduum?: As noted previously, the Latin Triduum offered by St. Ann will again use the liturgy in use prior to 1955, which has some beautiful and rich symbolism and traditions. You can learn more about these visit our Pre-55 webpage: https://charlottelatinmass.org/resources/pre-1955-holy-week/

Easter Vigil Potluck Reception: The CLMC will be organizing our annual Easter Potluck Reception after the Easter Vigil Liturgy (around midnight) in the St. Ann plaza. Please join us to welcome the new converts into the Church and to rejoice in the Resurrection of Our Lord. More details forthcoming.

The Unlikely Prophet Jonah as a Model for Us in Lent: Dr. Peter Kwasniewski has write up about Lent and Monday’s Lesson/Epistle from Mass, which is from the book of Jonah: http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/03/the-unlikely-prophet-jonah-as-model-for.html

Passion Sunday

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Sunday marks the beginning of the 2 week period within Lent called Passiontide, where the faithful focus more specifically on Our Blessed Lord’s Passion. As Dr. Mike Foley notes, sacred images are veiled, and the Judica Me, and the Glori Patri, are omitted from the Mass henceforth until Easter, as noted in his weekly reflection on Sunday’s propers: http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/03/the-secret-for-passion-sunday.html 

Additionally, Fisheaters.com notes these words (Judica Me and Glori Patri) are omitted to symbolize Christ veiling His glory from the Jews, as He begins the final days leading up to His Passion and death: https://www.fisheaters.com/customslent8.html  

Holy Week Update

St. Ann will host the 2021 Traditional Easter Triduum (Pre-1955*)

  • Palm Sunday – March 28: 12:30pm (*NOTE: The Palm Sunday Mass will be the 1962 Mass, not Pre-55)
  • Spy Wednesday March 31: 6pm (Low Mass, 1962)
  • Holy Thursday April 1:  7pm – Mass of the Lord’s Supper (Pre-55)
  • Good Friday April 2: 12:00 Noon – Stations of the Cross; 12:00 – 2:00 PM – Confessions; 3:00 PM – Passion of Our Lord Jesus Christ (Pre-55)
  • Holy Saturday April 3: 8:00 PM – Easter Vigil (Pre-55)
  • Easter Sunday April 4: 12:30pm High Mass (1962) (All other Sunday Latin Mass parishes in the diocese will be offering their normal Latin Mass as well)

Triduum update: According to St. Ann parish there will not be signups required for the Triduum. Additional seating should be outside in the plaza. All those desiring to receive Holy Communion will be able to receive on Holy Thursday or Easter Vigil. As a reminder there is no Holy Communion is offered on Good Friday – the Veneration of the Cross is the “People’s Communion” (see our Pre-55 page below)

What is the Pre-1955 Easter Latin Triduum?: As noted previously, the Latin Triduum offered by St. Ann will again use the liturgy in use prior to 1955, which has some beautiful and rich symbolism and traditions. You can learn more about these visit our Pre-55 webpage: https://charlottelatinmass.org/resources/pre-1955-holy-week/

Solemn Feast of the Annunciation – Thursday March 25

The solemn feast of the Annunciation commemorates St. Gabriel’s announcement of the Incarnation to the Blessed Mother. This is also a solemnity in the universal Church and as such, Lenten penances are relaxed for this day. Below are the Mass times:

  • 7pm – St. Thomas Aquinas parish (High)
  • 7pm – Our Lady of Grace parish, Greensboro (not sure if Low or High)

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • SAVE THE DATE –  Friday June 11, 7pm: Annual Traditional Latin Mass for the feast of the Sacred Heart at the Cathedral of St. Patrick. The Cathedral will offer a High (possibly Solemn High) for the feast of the Sacred Heart. More details forthcoming.  
  • Two Attitudes toward Ordinary Form Rubrics: Kantian Duty and Aristotelian Epikeia: In the going discussion over conservative Catholicism vs. traditional Catholicism (i.e the latter is the theology and philosophy that flows from the Traditional Latin Mass), Dr. Peter Kwasniewski has long but helpful piece on the difference between the two “theological” outlooks in the Church: http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2018/01/two-attitudes-toward-ordinary-form.html

Laetare Sunday

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Sunday is Laetare Sunday, the 4th Sunday of Lent where the Church gives us a glimmer of hope of the coming Easter, to help strengthen us for the last 3 weeks – hence the lighter rose colored vestments replace the violet. Dr. Mike Foley explains more in this week’s reflection on the Collect: http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/03/the-consoling-collect-of-laetare-sunday.html

Day Light Savings Notice:  Reminder that today Sunday March 14 is daylight savings time and clocks are moved ahead 1 hour.

Feast of St. Joseph – Friday March 19

This Friday is the great Solemnity of St. Joseph, the great spouse of the Blessed Virgin Mary. The Masses for this splendid feast day are:

  • 7am (St. Ann) – Low Mass,
  • 12:30pm (St. Mark) –  High Mass (Stations at 12 noon). 

On occasion of the solemnity, Lenten penances are relaxed – so you can also eat meat on Friday. To learn about the feast day visit these links:

Holy Week Update

St. Ann will host the 2021 Traditional Easter Triduum (Pre-1955*)

  • Palm Sunday – March 28: 12:30pm (*The Palm Sunday Mass will be the 1962 Mass, not Pre-55)
  • Holy Thursday April 1:  7pm – Mass of the Lord’s Supper
  • Good Friday April 2: 12:00 Noon – Stations of the Cross; 12:00 – 2:00 PM – Confessions; 3:00 PM – Passion of Our Lord Jesus Christ
  • Holy Saturday April 3: 8:00 PM – Easter Vigil
  • Easter Sunday April 4: 12:30pm High Mass

Traditional vs. Modernism: The Vaccine Part III:  

Several CLMC readers have expressed disappointment over the bishops’ recent promotion of the USCCB/Vatican’s guidance on vaccines. As we have discussed before (here, here, and here), Church hierarchy, sadly, have long been influenced modernism and its blind trust in science over God. However, there is hope: the Traditional Doctrine of Creation. This traditional teaching, once long forgotten, is now gaining momentum, and represents the antidote not only for the vaccine issue, but how the Church approaches science, and most of errors of modernism, which heavily influence healthcare and science. The CLMC was proud to co-sponsor a conference on this beautiful doctrine in 2019 entitled Evolution & The Culture of Death. The Church’s problems will continue to worsen until this doctrine is rediscovered (4 Kings 22:8).  If you haven’t watched it yet, we highly encourage you: https://sensusfidelium.us/evolution-the-culture-of-death-unmasking-the-roots-of-todays-abortion-movement/

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • Cardinal Burke Comments on Vatican Restrictions at St. Peter’s Basilica: His Eminence Raymond Cardinal Burke has an excellent statement regarding the Vatican’s new “decree”. What is most instructive is Cardinal Buke notes the degree was unsigned, missing a protocol number and came from the Vatican Secretariat of State which lacks jurisdiction over liturgical disciplines. Essentially the decree is invalid and has no authority. The Cardinal is equally concerned about the content of the unsigned letter:
    https://www.cardinalburke.com/presentations/statement-on-the-offering-of-the-holy-mass-in-the-papal-basilica-of-saint-peter  

    CLMC note: These actions, if accurate, should be of no surprise to traditionalists, as often the “deep church” or “deep state” will issue rhetorical “orders” with no legal standing, that sadly, people, including some priests, blindly follow out of a misunderstood concept of obedience. We even saw this in 1969 when the Traditional Latin Mass was allegedly “suppressed” by bishops and pastors.  Yet some 38 years later, Pope Benedict XVI clarified and noted this was untrue:

    “What earlier generations held as sacred, remains sacred and great for us too, and it cannot be all of a sudden entirely forbidden or even considered harmful.”Letter to bishops accompanying Summorum Pontificum, Pope Benedict XVI, July 2007

    “It is therefore permitted to celebrate the Sacrifice of the Mass following the typical edition of the Roman Missal, which was promulgated by Blessed John XXIII in 1962 and never abrogated, as an extraordinary form of the Church’s Liturgy.” – Summorum Pontificum, Pope Benedict XVI, July 2007

Lastly, as noted by the last article, this past Friday was the feast of St. Gregory the Great, the CLMC’s patron saint. We thank everyone who joined in our annual Rosary novena for full sacramental life in the Extraordinary Form. God willing, that will happen someday.

Easter Triduum 2021

As noted in Sunday’s St. Ann bulletin, we are pleased to share that St. Ann will again host the traditional Pre-1955 Easter Latin Triduum and in a generous act to the Latin Mass faithful, it will be offered in the main church as the only Triduum for the parish.

In future years, St. Ann and St. Thomas Aquinas parish will alternate hosting the Triduum each year (St. Ann offers it 2021; St. Thomas will host it 2022).

For those new to Latin Mass, the Pre-1955 Easter Triduum is the full ancient traditional Latin liturgy for Holy Week replete with its richness, traditions and symbolism. Although this is not the first Pre-1955 Triduum for the CLMC, this will be our first inside an actual church.

As more details are announced we will share them with you. Please offer a few prayers of thanksgiving to Fr. Reid and the parish staff for once again offering this beautiful gift for the faithful, but especially for God’s glory.

Holy Week dates are as follows:

Palm Sunday – March 28

  • 12:30pm

Holy Thursday April 1

  • 7pm – Mass of the Lord’s Supper

Good Friday April 2

  • 12:00 Noon – Stations of the Cross
  • 12:00 – 2:00 PM – Confessions
  • 3:00 PM – Passion of Our Lord Jesus Christ

Holy Saturday April 3

  • 8:00 PM – Easter Vigil

Easter Sunday April 4

  • 12:30pm High Mass

3rd Sunday of Lent

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Sunday is the 3rd Sunday of Lent, and as custom, Dr. Mike Foley has a commentary on the Collect for the Mass: http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/03/the-taciturn-collect-for-third-sunday.html

Feast of St. Thomas Aquinas – today at 11:30am

St. Thomas Aquinas parish will be celebrating its patronal feast day at the 11:30am Sunday Latin Mass (in the Traditional calendar St. Thomas Aquinas’ feast day is March 7). Please join the parish for a sublime liturgical celebration. After Mass, the parish is having an outdoor reception after the Latin Mass.

To learn more about the Angelic Doctor please see Dom Prosper Gueranger’s entry in his book, The Liturgical Year: https://sensusfidelium.us/the-liturgical-year-dom-prosper-gueranger/march/march-7-st-thomas-of-aquinas-doctor-of-the-church/

Upcoming Feasts/Masses

  • Friday March 12, feast of St. Gregory the Great: 7am (St. Ann); 12:30pm (St. Mark) – both Low Masses
  • Wednesday March 17, feast of St. Patrick: 6pm (St. Ann) – Low Mass
  • Friday March 19, Solemnity/feast of St. Joseph: 7am (St. Ann) (Low), 12:30pm (St. Mark) High Mass. On occasion of this great solemnity, Lenten penances are relaxed – one can also eat meat on this Friday.
  • Saturday March 27, 4th Saturday Respect Latin Mass, 8am (followed by vigil at Planned Parenthood)

Easter Triduum 2021: To be announced shortly.

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • Pray for the canonization of Ignatius Cardinal Kung – March 12: During the Cold War, there were two high ranking prelates imprisoned by communists around the world for practicing their Catholic faith. In the west, it was Cardinal Jozsef Mindszenty of Hungary (later escaped to the U.S. Embassy in Budapest, and then was later exiled to Austria until his death in 1975). In the east, it was Cardinal Ignatius Kung, the archbishop of Shanghai who stood strong for papal authority, and for it spent the better part of 30 years in prison (1955-1985).In 1979, Pope John Paul II secretly named him a cardinal “in pectore” (e.g. close to the heart). After his release, Cardinal Kung was eventually immigrated to the U.S., where he lived in Connecticut until his death in March 12, 2000. We know from the Cardinal Kung Foundation that Cardinal Kung frequently offered the Traditional Mass during his last years in the U.S. On this day let us remember to pray for his canonization. To learn more about Cardinal Kung, and to support the underground Church in China with your Lenten almsgiving (including having Masses offered in China), please visit: http://www.cardinalkungfoundation.org/
  • The Patriarch Joseph in The Liturgy: This past Friday, the Epistle reading at Mass on Friday was about the ancient patriarch Joseph, who was sold into slavery into Egypt. How appropriate the reading falls in March which is the month of the new Joseph, the spouse of the Blessed Mother. The New Liturgical Movement picks up this topic on the similarities between Joseph the Patriarch and St. Joseph here: newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/03/the-patriarch-joseph-in-liturgy-of-lent.html
  • Traditional Books by TAN: The local Catholic publisher, TAN Books has a great selection of traditional books. As we enter into the month of St. Joseph and the full month of Lent, we pass along a few of these selections:

All the above books either reference approved visions, or sourced from Sacred Tradition, and can help to “fill in the blanks” on the life of Christ that scripture may omit or be silent on.

Annual Rosary Novena to St. Gregory Begins Today

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Today Wednesday March 3rd begins our annual novena to St. Gregory the Great, the patron saint of the CLMC (his feast day is March 12).  To learn more about this great saint (whose name bears the Gregorian Chant he codified) please read Dom Prosper Gueranger’s write up on St. Gregory the Great:
https://sensusfidelium.us/the-liturgical-year-dom-prosper-gueranger/march/march-12-st-gregory-the-great-pope-doctor-of-the-church/

Rosary Novena to St. Gregory Wednesday March 3 – Thursday March 11 (the day prior to the feast of St. Gregory)

The Rosary novena, which is attached, consists of praying 1 Rosary daily for 9 days (March 3 – March 11), and at the end of each Rosary, offering this attached prayer to St. Gregory for our intentions.   As we prayed in prior years, we again ask you to also consider including the following intentions:

  • Full sacramental/parish life in the Extraordinary Form for Charlotte (includes daily Masses & confessions, Confirmation, Triduum, Divine office, traditional catechesis, devotions, etc.)
  • Sanctity of our Latin Mass Priests and Bishop Jugis
  • That Our Lord may send more Latin Mass priests and traditional vocations to Charlotte

We are indeed grateful for the Latin Masses offered in the diocese by the priests under our pious bishop,  though we offer this novena as we still have a long path before the Latin Mass faithful have their daily spiritual needs fulfilled in both the sacramental and parochial life under the Extraordinary Form – particularly at one parish location (currently the faithful have to travel to various parishes for Latin Mass on different days). God willing, that will happen someday.

In the interim, would you consider joining us to pray for our spiritual needs? Children are especially encouraged to join as the prayers of children are most efficacious to God (Matthew 18:3-4).

Novena:

At the end of each Rosary, add this prayer:

St. Gregory, you are known for your zeal for the Catholic faith, love of liturgy, and compassion and mercy toward those in need. Please help and guide us so that we may share in these virtues and thereby bring Jesus into the hearts of our families and all we encounter. We especially ask for blessings on our parish family, our priests and our deacons.

I also ask that you graciously intercede for me before God so that I might be granted the special assistance and graces that I seek (full sacramental and parochial life in the Extraordinary Form for the Charlotte faithful and that Our Lord will send more Latin Mass priests to our diocese).  Help me to live as a faithful child of God and to attain the eternal happiness of heaven.

St. Gregory the Great pray for us. Amen

PDF link: https://charlottelatinmass.files.wordpress.com/2018/02/rosary-novena-prayer-to-st-gregory.pdf

2nd Sunday of Lent

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Sunday is the 2nd Sunday of Lent, and as custom, Dr. Mike Foley provides commentary on Sunday’s Collect prayer for Mass:
http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/02/the-transformative-collect-of-second.html

Upcoming Latin Masses & Blessing of Religious Objects

Saturday March 6 – Blessing of Religious Objects: Each 1st Saturday, after the 10am Latin Mass, priests at St. Thomas Aquinas parish in Charlotte will be available to bless any religious objects – including objects that may require a unique blessing, such with as holy salt. We presume these blessings will be the traditional rituals (e.g. Latin).  Please also see our article on the validity of traditional blessings below in our news section.

Sunday March 7 – Feast of St. Thomas Aquinas: St. Thomas Aquinas parish will be celebrating its patronal feast day at the 11:30am Sunday Latin Mass (in the Traditional calendar St. Thomas Aquinas’ feast day is March 7). Please join the parish for a sublime liturgical celebration. After Mass, the parish is having an outdoor reception after the Latin Mass. If you are attending and can bring some food, they would appreciate it by signing up here: www.stacharlotte.com/feastday   Disclaimer: The signup is for FOOD only, there will not be a sign up for attending Mass or the reception.

Sunday July 11, 12:30pm, Traditional Confirmations at St. Ann: This summer the parish will be hosting the annual traditional Sacrament of Confirmation on Sunday July 11 during the 12:30pm Latin Mass. Msgr. Winslow, the Vicar General for the diocese will administer in lieu of the bishop (who is administering the Novus Ordo Confirmations at St. Ann in May). If you have children confirmation age, please contact the parish for details.

New Sunday Latin Mass Begins in Columbia, South Carolina tomorrow Sunday February 28 at 1pm

We are pleased to share that our friends in Columbia (many whom travel to St. Ann on Sundays), have at long last have a regular Sunday Latin Mass. It will be a 1pm Low Mass at Our Lady of the Lake parish in Chapin, South Carolina (195 Amicks Ferry Road Chapin SC 29036).  The parish is doing signup Masses, so you will have to reserve a spot:  (www.signupgenius.com/go/30e0d4facaa2ea4fb6-mass). To learn more or to contact the Columbia Traditional Latin Mass Society, visit: https://www.ctlms.org/

Annual CLMC Novena to St. Gregory (Begins Wednesday March – Ends Thursday March 11)

Wednesday March 3rd begins our annual novena to St. Gregory the Great, the patron saint of the CLMC.  The novena (click here to view), consists of praying 1 Rosary daily for 9 days (March 3 – March 11), and at the end of each daily Rosary, offering this attached prayer to St. Gregory for our spiritual needs to be provided for (although progress has been made, much still remains to be fulfilled).   As we prayed in prior years, we again ask you to also consider including the following intentions:

  • Full sacramental/parish life in the Extraordinary Form for Charlotte (includes daily Masses & confessions, Confirmation, Triduum, Divine office, traditional catechesis, devotions, etc.)
  • Sanctity of our Latin Mass Priests and Bishop Jugis
  • That Our Lord may send more Latin Mass priests and traditional vocations to Charlotte

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • LifeSiteNews’ Conference on COVID & Vaccines: Bishop Schneider made the above remarks at an informative online conference about COVID and vaccines, which sadly, there is still much confusion in the Church about the correct teachings on this matter. To learn more visit: https://www.lifesitenews.com/unmasking-vaccines/
  • The New City of God – Clear Creek Abbey: Abbot Philip Anderson, who oversees Clear Creek Abbey in Oklahoma, a traditional Benedictine Monastery on the edge of the Ozarks, penned a beautiful letter this month (click here to view), outlining a simple road map to rebuild Christendom. Simply put, its small localism, surrounded by a beautiful and growing Abbey.  As John Senior (the college professor who converted Abt. Anderson and many other monks), wrote in his book, The Restoration of Christian Culture, that the restoration of Christian Culture needs to be done around a monastery. We would add, especially one that offers the Mass of Ages exclusively. For all the good news coming out of the Charlotte Diocese, one thing that is lacking are monasteries and cloistered religious orders, those praying and fasting daily in reparation for sins – perhaps one can offer their Lenten sacrifices and prayers for this to change. They are the key to restoring Catholic culture.

Prayer Requests

  • Giovanni Braschi (+): Pray for the repose of the soul of Msgr. Giovanni Braschi (+), who served as custodian of the Shrine of St. Philomena in Mugnano/Avellino, Italy for many years. Since the CLMC has developed a devotion to this saint, whose relics are housed in this shrine, let us offer prayers for this priest who helped to promote devotion to her. To learn more about the Shrine visit: http://philomena.us/

1st Sunday of Lent

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Sunday is the 1st Sunday of Lent and as custom, Dr. Mike Foley has a reflection on Sunday’s Collect: http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/02/fasting-and-orations-of-first-sunday-of.html

Upcoming Latin Masses

Saturday February 27: St. Ann will offer a Respect Life Latin Mass (Low) Saturday February 27 at 8:00am, followed by a vigil at Planned Parenthood.

Sunday March 7 – Feast of St. Thomas Aquinas: St. Thomas Aquinas parish will be celebrating its patronal feast day at the 11:30am Sunday Latin Mass (in the Traditional calendar St. Thomas Aquinas’ feast day is March 7). Please join the parish for a sublime liturgical celebration.

New Confraternity of Fatima Forms  

We are pleased to share the formation of the Confraternity of Our Lady of Fatima, a group dedicated to living out the message of Fatima and for praying for the conversion of Russia and the triumph of the Immaculate Heart. This has been endorsed by Bishop Athanasius Schneider. For more information please see the following two links: https://knightsofcolumbuslatinmass.blogspot.com/2021/02/announcing-confraternity-of-our-lady-of.html or the Confraternity’s page: https://www.livefatima.io 

How to Become A Member:

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • Vaccine expert answers critics, exposes horrific nature of abortion-tainted vaccine research: Pamela Acker, whom we co-sponsored at our 2019 Evolution and the Culture of Death conference, has penned another important piece on the growing links of abortion dismemberment and vaccines. She also provides an excellent quote from the Council of Trent:

The infidel, too, begs of God to cure his diseases and to heal his wounds, to deliver him from approaching or impending evils; but he places his principal hope of deliverance in the remedies provided by nature, or prepared by man.  He makes no scruple of using medicine no matter by whom prepared, no matter if accompanied by charms, spells or other diabolical arts, provided he can promise himself some hope of recovery.

Not so the Christian.  When visited by sickness, or other adversity, he flies to God as his supreme refuge and defense…

…Hence the Sacred Scriptures condemn the conduct of those who, confiding in the power of medicine, seek no assistance from God [2 Chron 16:12]. Nay more, those who regulate their lives by the laws of God, abstain from the use of all medicines which are not evidently intended by God to be medicinal; and, were there even a certain hope of recovery by using any other, they abstain from them as so many charms and diabolical artifices. [Emphasis added] – Council of Trent

https://www.lifesitenews.com/opinion/vaccine-expert-answers-critics-exposes-horrific-nature-of-abortion-tainted-vaccine-research

  • Spanish Carlism movement with Eduardo Ordoñez: Steve Cunningham of Sensus Fidelium just released what appears to be an interesting interview with Eduardo Ordoñez on the topic of the Carlist Movement in Spain – these are Spanish Catholics who have and continue to defend the traditional Catholic perspective on government and the Social Kingship of Christ, and the Catholic Spanish monarchy, which they argue is best suited to defend the rights of Christ and His Church. To learn more visit: https://youtu.be/VLWctPR88-g

Memoirs by Venerable Jozsef Cardinal Mindszenty

As the world worries about a possible Marxist or communist takeover of society, one book worth reading, if you can find it – especially during Lent – is the memoirs of Venerable Jozsef Cardinal Mindszenty. He was the tough anti-communist primate of Hungary, who was imprisoned first by the Nazis in World War II, and then by the invading communists for speaking out against their godless ideologies and atrocities. Mindszenty spent 8 years in prison where he was beaten and tortured. During the brief 1956 uprising against the Hungary’s communist government he escaped to the U.S. Embassy where he lived in asylum under the care of our government until 1971 when the Vatican during Pope Paul VI, shamefully forced him to leave the country so Rome could strike an agreement with the communist government. Among Cardinal Mindszenty’s many comments about communists, he noted two things which may resonate today:

  • The communists prohibited certain public religious ceremonies, and “in some areas mass meetings and travel were banned on the pretext that there was danger of epidemics.”
  • Cardinal Mindszenty also recommended the Hungarian bishops “not accept government subsidies that were to pay the salaries of the priests, and to trust the Hungarian people would not leave its priests without a pittance”. He told his brother bishops: “We may be poor, but we must remain independent. In an atheistic state a church that is not independent can only play the part of a slave.”

Sadly, the bishops didn’t listen, and under fear, signed an agreement leading to much harm to the Catholic faith in Hungary. We mention this because sadly many dioceses and parishes in our own time decided to accept government subsidies – including the Charlotte Diocese ($8 million) – from the U.S. government to pay staff salaries due to lost tithing money as the churches remained voluntarily closed (n.b. dioceses have received federal funds years prior to COVID).

While there were a lot of unknowns back in March/April, one cannot help to see the danger of parishes blindly accepting subsidies from a government which promotes immoral actions such abortion, sterilization, contraception, divorce, the HHS mandate, lockdowns, abortion-linked vaccines, and other attacks on the Church’s, liberty and Christ’s Kingship (regardless of who is president). It seems Cardinal Mindszenty raises a good point of whether dioceses that accept subsidies from a government might be reduced to “play the part of a slave”, and fail to fully preach on moral issues of our time due to the subsidies.

This is important to the Latin Mass and the traditions it promotes, as it could be possible that a government tries again to “cancel” a Latin Mass and related activities on the pretext of an “epidemic”, or some other excuse. Can a diocese stand up and reclaim the Church’s traditional stance against communism and socialism or will subsidies cause them to hesitate? Let us consider taking advantage of the Year of St. Joseph, and pray to him, the patron saint against socialism and communism for strength and fortitude for Church’s priests and bishops.

New 4 Volume Set of Blessed Anne Catherine Emmerich’s Visions

Lastly, if you are a voracious reader and are looking for a last minute Lenten (or yearly) book series to begin, you may want to take a look at TAN Book’s recent publishing of all 4 volumes of Blessed Anne Catherine Emmerich’s visions about the life of Christ, and other periods of the bible: https://tanbooks.com/catholic-tradition/church-history/the-life-of-jesus-christ-and-biblical-revelations-from-the-visions-of-blessed-anne-catherine-emmerich-hardbound-complete-set-of-4/

Quinquagesima Sunday & Ash Wednesday (Corrected)

(updated to correct a typo for the Ash Wednesday Masses)

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Sunday is Quinquagesima Sunday or roughly 50 days before Easter, and the last Sunday before Lent begins. It also begins the 3-day period known as “Shrovetide” which was traditionally a time for people to make their confessions before the holy season of Lent starts. As custom, Dr. Mike Foley provides more background on this mini-liturgical season and the reflection on Sunday’s Collect: http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/02/the-shrovish-collect-of-quinquagesima.html

Ash Wednesday Latin Masses

We are pleased to share there will be 4 diocesan Latin Masses for Ash Wednesday. Although there is only a morning Latin Mass in Charlotte, there are later Masses outside of the area.

  • St. Ann parish, Charlotte: 7:00am Low (corrected – there is only a morning Latin Mass)
  • Our Lady of Grace, Greensboro, 12:15pm Low (signups now required – please visit the parish website: https://olgchurch.org/)
  • St. Elizabeth of the Hill Country, Boone, 6:00pm, Low
  • St. John the Baptist, Tryon, 6:30pm, Low

Sprinkling of Ashes: Modernist Innovation or Traditional Custom?

There’s been a some debate over the Holy See’s new recommendation for the Novus Ordo Mass that due to “COVID”, ashes be “sprinkled” on people’s heads instead of the custom of the priest making a sign of the cross with ashes over one’s forehead. However, St. Ann parish has also chosen to “sprinkle” ashes on the head this year at the Latin Mass. CLMC admits that we hadn’t heard much about this, and Father kindly contacted a Traditional Latin Mass priest in Rome to confirm. Father learned that in Europe, this sprinkling is actually been the norm or custom – the forehead option has been an American custom as best we can tell.

Further, the priest in Rome noted that according to Fr. Adrian Fortescue’s book The Ceremonies of the Roman Rite Described (published 1918 but updated for the 1962 books): “the rubrics do not define exactly the place where the ashes are put (…). Lay people receive them on the top of the head or on the forehead.”.

Another reader related to us that the sprinkling of ashes on the head was traditionally reserved for men, and the forehead was for women (who were always wearing chapel veils over their heads).  Dr. Mike Foley has also commented that “sprinkling” was an ancient custom in Europe. Furthermore, Fr. John Zuhlsdorf (Father Z.) added some commentary on this blog:

https://wdtprs.com/2021/02/ask-father-covid-1984-and-ash-wednesday-2021-sprinkling-ashes-instead-of-tracing-a-cross/

Ultimately, this appears to be optional for Latin Mass pastors and distribution will differ parish by parish.  We’re open to learning more on this matter. Perhaps in the future a liturgical historian will give more history on the topic.

REMINDER: Lenten Spiritual Enrollment (9 days left!)

The traditional Carmelite Hermits of Our Lady of Mt. Carmel in Fairfield, PA are again offering a special Lenten spiritual enrollment which you can begin to participate in today. The Hermits will be offering 40 Masses, 40 days of praying the Divine Office (and other daily prayers), and 40 days of fasting and penance all for the intention of your family or other enrolled loved ones.  This is an amazing spiritual gift. Here is the link to the enrollment form: http://www.ednmc.org/

Please make an offering of alms along with this enrollment.  Your generous financial sacrifice will bear all the more fruit for your intentions. Enrollment needs to be completed by this Tuesday February 16.

1st Saturday Blessing of Religious Objects at St. Thomas Aquinas

Each 1st Saturday, after the 10am Latin Mass, priests at St. Thomas Aquinas parish in Charlotte will be available to bless any religious objects – including objects that may require a unique blessing, such with as holy salt. We presume these blessings will be the traditional rituals (e.g. Latin).

Preparations and Guidelines for Lent

  • Preparing For a Holy Lent – by Fr. Kauth: As Lent begins this Wednesday, Fr. Kauth, rector of St. Joseph’s Seminary, has a Lenten reflection to prepare the faithful for Lent: https://stjcs.org/preparing-for-a-holy-lent/

Latin Mass & Traditional News 

  • Sophia Press Announces Benedictus, a New Monthly Guide to the Traditional Latin Mass: We are pleased to share that a new publication, Benedictus, is being published for the Traditional Latin Mass, which includes daily readings for the Mass. It’s not a missal but a monthly guide that features the readings for Latin Mass, as well as meditations, reflections for the Traditional Latin Mass. It has been endorsed by many notable traditional priests including , Archbishop Viganò, Bishop Schneider and others. The publication comes out in July but they are taking subscriptions now. To learn more visit: https://praybenedictus.com/ and also read Dr. Peter Kwasniewski’s article: http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/02/sophia-press-announces-benedictus-new.html
  • Traditional vs. Modern Theology with Fr. Ripperger: Over the last few weeks we’ve highlighted the difference between traditional theology that undergirds the Latin Mass and its doctrine and progressive/modernist theology that developed around and after Vatican II. We are now excited to share with you a excellent talk with exorcist and theologian Fr. Chad Ripperger and Catholic publisher Ryan Grant (who visited us in 2018) on the differences between these approaches, the distinctions and why the traditional approach is the most sound: https://youtu.be/T4hIgDR29bg
  • The Problem With Women Lectors: Speaking of traditional vs. modern theology, there can be no better area to highlight the differences in theology than the Vatican’s decision to permit women lectors in the Novus Ordo. A Traditional Latin Mass priest examines the matter and clearly explains the problems, and how letting women into the sanctuary in the first place was against Sacred Tradition (and a bad idea with cultural ramifications): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ws50olZj4ls
  • Book recommendation – “The Month of St. Joseph”, by Father M de Langalerie: Mater Dei Latin Mass parish in Dallas, Texas is recommending a book written by Archbishop Pierre-Henri Gérault de Langalerie of Auch France in 1874, entitled The Month of Joseph. It includes 30 day of prayers to pray during March. To preview and purchase it visit: https://www.staugustineacademypress.com/month-of-st-joseph/

Carmelite Hermits Special Lenten Offer

Laudetur Iesus Christus! As you may recall, the traditional Carmelite Hermits of Fairfield, Pennsylvania, have a beautiful Lenten spiritual offer we again want to share with you.

The Hermits are offering a special Lenten spiritual enrollment which you can begin to participate in today. The Hermits will be offering:

  • 40 Masses
  • 40 days of praying the Divine Office (and other daily prayers), and;
  • 40 days of fasting and penance

All done for the intention of your family or other enrolled loved ones.

If you have anyone in need of conversion, healing, or strength, you may consider enrolling them This is an amazing spiritual gift. Here is the link to the enrollment form: http://www.ednmc.org/

Please make an offering of alms along with this enrollment.  Your generous financial sacrifice will bear all the more fruit for your intentions (The Hermits completely subsist on donations).

The deadline to enroll is Tuesday February 16.