Easter Sunday

Christus Resurréxit! Resurréxit Vere! Blessed Pascaltide greetings on this Easter morning, the first day within the Octave of Easter.  The great Benedictine liturgist, Dom Prosper Gueranger OSB, aptly sums up the joy of Easter Sunday morning as experienced by the Blessed Mother, who according to tradition was the first to see her risen Son:  

“The night between Saturday and Sunday has well nigh run its course, and the day-dawn is appearing. The Mother of sorrows is waiting, in courageous hope and patience, for the blissful moment of her Jesus’ return. Magdalene and the other holy women have spent the night in watching, and are preparing to start for the sepulcher. In limbo, the Soul of our crucified Lord is about to give the glad word of departure to the myriads of the long-imprisoned holy souls, who cluster round Him in adoring love. Death is still holding his silent sway over the sepulcher, where rests the Body of Jesus. Since the day when he gained his first victim, Abel, he has swept off countless generations; but never has he held in his grasp a prey so noble as this that now lies in the tomb near Calvary. Never has the terrible sentence of God, pronounced against our first parents, received such a fulfillment as this; but never has death received such a defeat as the one that is now preparing. It is true, the power of God has, at times brought back the dead to life: the son of the widow of Naim, and Lazarus, were reclaimed from the bondage of this tyrant death; but he regained his sway over them all. But his Victim of Calvary is to conquer him forever, for this is He of whom it is written in the prophecy: “O death! I will be thy death!” Yet a few brief moments and the battle will be begun, and life shall vanquish death.

…Meanwhile, our risen Jesus, seen by no other mortal eye, has sped to His most holy Mother. He is the Son of God; He is the vanquisher of death; but He is, likewise, the Son of Mary. She stood near Him to the last, uniting the sacrifice of her mother’s heart with that He made upon the Cross; it is just, therefore, that she should be the first to partake of the joy of His resurrection. The Gospel does not relate the apparition thus made by Jesus to His Mother, whereas all the others are fully described. It is not difficult to assign the reason. The other apparitions were intended as proofs of the resurrection; this to Mary was dictated by the tender love borne to her by her Son. Both nature and grace required that His first visit should be to such a Mother, and Christian hearts dwell with delight on the meditation of the mystery. There was no need of its being mentioned in the Gospel; the tradition of the holy Fathers, beginning with St. Ambrose, bears sufficient testimony to it; and even had they been silent, our hearts would have told it us. And why was it that our Savior rose fro the tomb so early on the day He had fixed for His resurrection? It was because His filial love was impatient to satisfy the vehement longings of His dearest and most afflicted Mother. Such is the teaching of many pious and learned writers; and who that knows aught of Jesus and Mary could refuse to accept it?

But who is there would attempt to describe the joy of such a meeting? Those eyes, that had grown dim from wakefulness and tears, now flash with delight at beholding the brightness which tells her Jesus is come. He calls her by her name; not with the tone of voice which pierced her soul when He addressed her from the Cross, but with an accent of joy and love, such as a son would take when telling a mother that he had triumphed. The Body which, three days ago, she had seen covered with Blood and dead, is now radiant with life, beaming with the reflections of divinity. He speaks to her words of tenderest affection, He embraces her, He kisses her. Who, we ask, would dare to describe this scene, which the devout Abbot Rupert says so inundated the soul of Mary with joy that it made her forget all the sorrows she had endured.”

Nor must we suppose that the visit was a short one. In one of the revelations granted to the seraphic St. Teresa, our Lord told her that when He appeared to His blessed Mother immediately after His resurrection, He found her so overwhelmed with grief that she would soon have died; that it was not until several moments had passed, that she was able to realize the immense joy of His presence; and that He remained a long time with her, in order to console her.

Let us, who love this blessed Mother and have seen her offer up her Son on Calvary for our sake, let us affectionately rejoice in the happiness wherewith Jesus now repays her, and let us learn to compassionate her in her dolors. This is the first manifestation of our risen Jesus: it is a just reward for the unwavering faith which has dwelt in Mary’s soul during these three days, when all but she had lost it. But it is time for Him to show Himself to others, that so the glory of His resurrection may be made known to the world. His first visit was to her who is the dearest to Him of all creatures, and who well deserved the favor; now, in His goodness, He is about to console those devoted women, whose grief is, perhaps, too human, but their love is firm, and neither death nor the tomb have shaken it.

Commentary on Sunday’s Easter Collect: As custom, we share Dr. Mike Foley’s commentary on Easter Sunday’s Collect for the Mass: http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/04/the-collect-for-easter-sunday.html

Easter Sunday Latin Masses

Charlotte

  • St. Thomas Aquinas – 11:30am
  • St. Ann – 12:30pm

Outside Charlotte

Latin Mass Schedule Changes for Easter Week

Easter Thursday April 21: There will be a 10am Latin Mass at St. Thomas Aquinas parish. The normal 7pm Latin Mass is canceled for this week only.

Respect Life Latin Mass – Saturday April 23, 8am (St. Ann)

St. Ann will offer its monthly 8am Latin Mass for an end to abortion, followed by prayers at the abortion facility (or a Holy Hour of Reparation).

Divine Mercy Novena Good Friday – Easter Saturday (April 15 – 23): Good Friday began the Divine Mercy novena which concludes the day before Divine Mercy/Low Sunday, Saturday April 23.  St. Ann’s features a statue of the Divine Mercy of Our Lord in front of the parish, honoring the late seminarian & parishioner Michael Kitson who passed away on Divine Mercy Sunday a few years ago.  As we have asked in prior years, for those who observe this devotion please consider praying for these intentions as part of your novena:

For the suffering Christians in the Middle East and around the world; an end of abortion in our country; the reestablishment of the weekly Sunday Latin Mass at Sacred Heart parish in Salisbury; restoration of the Latin Triduum for 2023 (new addition); and for the regularization (resolution of the status) of the Society of St. Pius X.

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • Maundy Thursday Sermon: We share a wonderful sermon by Fr. Armand de Malleray, FSSP, at the Latin Mass parish in Warrington, England for Maundy Thursday. Father preaches on the Holy Eucharist, the priesthood, and extends an invitation for young men to consider the priesthood, and particularly his congregation, the Fraternity of St. Peter (FSSP), which offers the Latin Mass exclusively: https://youtu.be/KEA99uvyMOA (He also subtly and with gratitude, notes that thanks to Pope Francis’ February 11 decree, there is no safer place for a Latin Mass seminarian than the FSSP)

Easter Evening: The Road to Emmaus – Dom Prosper Gueranger, OSB

To conclude today’s update as it began, we share excerpts from Dom Gueranger’s continued Easter reflection from his book, The Liturgical Year, specifically the fifth and last appearance Our Lord made on Easter Sunday evening, to the two disciples on the road to Emmaus:

The Day of Jesus’ Resurrection is fast drawing to its close. It is the day honoured by God with the greatest of all miracles: it is the most important day that has ever dawned upon the world since Light was first created: but the night will soon be upon us, shadowing the brightness of the great day. Four times has our Redeemer appeared. He would now manifest Himself to the whole of His Apostles, and thus enable them to know by their own experience what they have, a few hours since, learned from Peter’s testimony. But, leaving, for a few moments longer, these men, whom He honours with the name of Brethren, and who now believe in His Resurrection, He would first console two hearts that are grieving on His account, though their grief comes from their want of faith.

Two men are traversing the road from Jerusalem to Emmaus, slowly and sadly. They are evidently suffering from some cruel disappointment; nay, they give one the idea that a motive of fear impels them to leave the city. They had been Disciples of Jesus; but the ignominious and violent death of this Master, in whom they had had such confidence, has filled their hearts with bitter despondency. They were ashamed of having joined themselves with one who is not what they took Him to be. They had hid themselves after His execution; but the report having been spread of His sepulcher having been broken into, and the Body taken away, they resolve to seek a safer refuge. Jesus’ enemies have great power, and are doubtless busy taking proceedings against those who have dared to break the seal of the sepulcher. Perhaps all that have had any connection with this Jesus will be arraigned before the public tribunal.

Whilst thus conferring with each other on the sad events of the last few days, a stranger overtakes them and walks with them. It is Jesus. So absorbed are they in their own sorrow, that they do not recognize Him. The same happens to us, when we give way to feelings of human grief, we lose sight of that God who comes to cheer us by His presence along the path of our exile…

…At length, Jesus makes himself known to our two incredulous disciples. They have placed him at the head of the table; it is for him to break the bread. He takes it into his divine hands, as he did at the Last Supper; and no sooner has he divided the bread and given them their portion, than their eyes are opened, and they recognize their guest as Jesus, the risen Jesus. They would throw themselves at his feet—but he has disappeared, leaving them mute with surprise, and yet transported with exceeding joy. It is the fifth apparition. It is described by St Luke, and forms the Gospel of tomorrow’s Mass (Easter Monday).

The two disciples cannot wait; though so late in the evening, they must hurry back to Jerusalem, and tell the Apostles that their Master is living, that they have seen him, and talked with him. They therefore leave Emmaus, where they thought to pass the night, and are soon back in the city from which they had tremblingly fled. They are soon with the Apostles; but they find them already aware of the glad tidings, and fervent in their faith of the Resurrection. Before they have time to open their lips, the Apostles exclaim: ‘The Lord hath truly risen, and hath appeared unto Simon!’[41] The two disciples then relate what has just happened to themselves.

Christus Resurréxit! Resurréxit Vere! What Mass are you attending Easter Sunday?

Palm Sunday

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Today is the second Sunday of Passiontide, Palm Sunday. Dr. Mike Foley offers a helpful reflection on today’s Collect, which marks the beginning of the holiest week of the liturgical year: http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/03/the-collect-of-palm-sunday.html We also share some commentary on the day:

Palm Sunday Masses will be offered at 11:30am (St. Thomas), and 12:30pm (St. Ann) according to the 1962 rubrics.

Six Sundays for the Triduum – Thank you

We thank everyone who have made the heroic sacrifice to join us for Latin Masses during the six Sundays of Lent to help restore the Latin Triduum. Today, Palm Sunday is the sixth Sunday of Lent, and although the Latin Triduum will not be offered this year in Charlotte, we invite you to still join on Sunday, and to continue to pray and offer penance for the Latin Mass. By God’s grace, these sacrifices will bear fruit. It is a sorrowful situation to have this beautiful good, the Latin Triduum which gives much glory to God, taken away. Yet the CLMC is not afraid of what lies ahead for the Latin Mass and neither should our readers.  As exorcist Fr. Chad Ripperger noted in September, despite these attacks and cancellations, the Latin Mass will continue until the second coming of Christ. Until that time, we in Charlotte can now “turn the tables” on this liturgical persecution (if one may call it that) by utilizing this suffering, uniting oneself to the Passion Our Lord experienced this week, and using this Triduum absence as an opportunity to offer it for this diocese, that it receives the graces to bring about an even greater good for the Latin Mass – perhaps a liturgical framework that is more stable and secure than what exited prior.  Lastly, please continue to offer your prayers and Lenten penances for Bishop Jugis. As we’ve mentioned prior, he is a prayerful bishop and remains in a very difficult situation. As you can imagine, he needs our prayers and penances more than ever.

Easter Sunday Latin Masses

The good news is all the Easter Latin Masses will be offered as scheduled. Here is a listing of diocesan Latin Masses in the area:

Charlotte

  • St. Thomas Aquinas – 11:30am
  • St. Ann – 12:30pm

Outside Charlotte

Divine Mercy Novena begins Good Friday – Easter Saturday (April 15 – 23): Good Friday begins the Divine Mercy novena which concludes the day before Divine Mercy/Low Sunday April 24. St. Ann’s features a statue of the Divine Mercy of Our Lord in front of the parish, honoring the late seminarian & parishioner Michael Kitson who passed away on Divine Mercy Sunday a few years ago.  As we have asked in prior years, for those who observe this devotion please consider praying for these intentions as part of your novena: For the suffering Christians in the Middle East; an end of abortion in our country; the reestablishment of the weekly Sunday Latin Mass at Sacred Heart parish in Salisbury; restoration of the Latin Triduum for 2023 (new addition); and for the regularization (resolution of the status) of the Society of St. Pius X.

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • The Chapters of Passiontide: Fr. William Rock, FSSP, from the Fraternity of St. Peter (FSSP), a congregation of priests that offer the Latin Mass exclusively wrote an article on the little “chapter” readings contained in the Divine Office for this Passiontide season and helps to call everyone to reparation for sins:  https://fssp.com/the-chapters-of-passiontide/:

Palm Sunday Reflection – Dom Prosper Gueranger, OSB

To close this update, we share the great 19th century liturgist, Dom Prosper Gueranger’s reflection for Palm Sunday, in this book, The Liturgical Year:

“Early in the morning of this day, Jesus sets out for Jerusalem, leaving Mary, his Mother, and the two sisters Martha and Mary Magdalene, and Lazarus, at Bethania. The Mother of Sorrows trembles at seeing her Son thus expose himself to danger, for his enemies are bent upon his destruction; but it is not Death, it is Triumph, that Jesus is to receive today in Jerusalem. The Messias, before being nailed to the Cross, is to be proclaimed King by the people of the great City; the little children are to make her streets echo with their Hosannas to the Son of David; and this in presence of the soldiers of Rome’s Emperor, and of the High Priests and Pharisees—the first, standing under the banner of their Eagles; the second, dumb with rage.

The Prophet Zachary had foretold this Triumph which the Son of Man was to receive a few days before his Passion, and which had been prepared for him from all eternity. Rejoice greatly, O Daughter of Sion! Shout for joy, O daughter of Jerusalem! Behold thy King will come to thee; the Just and the Savior. He is poor, and riding upon an ass, and upon a colt, the foal of an ass. Jesus, knowing That the hour was come for the fulfillment of this prophecy, singles out two from the rest of his Disciples, and bids them lead him to an ass and her colt, which they would find not far off. He had got to Bethphage, on Mount Olivet. The two Disciples lose no time in executing the order given them by their divine Master; and the ass and the colt are soon brought to the place where he stands.

The holy Fathers have explained to us the mystery of these two animals. The ass represents the Jewish people, which had been long under the yoke of the Law; the colt, upon which, as the Evangelist says, no man yet hath sat, is a figure of the Gentile world, which no one had ever yet brought into subjection. The future of these two people is to be decided in a few days hence: the Jews will be rejected for having refused to acknowledge Jesus as the Messias; the Gentiles will take their place, be adopted as God’s people, and become docile and faithful.

The Disciples spread their garments upon the colt; and our Savior, that the prophetic figure might be fulfilled, sat upon him, and advances towards Jerusalem. As soon as it was known that Jesus was near the City, the Holy Spirit worked in the hearts of those Jews who had come, from all parts, to celebrate the Feast of the Passover. They go out to meet our Lord, holding palm branches in their hands, and loudly proclaiming him to be King. They that had accompanied Jesus from Bethania join the enthusiastic crowd. While some spread their garments on the way, others cut down boughs from the Palm trees, and strewed them along the road. Hosanna is the triumphant cry, proclaiming to the whole city that Jesus, the Son of David, has made his entrance as her King.

Thus did God, in his power over men’s hearts, procure a triumph for his Son, and in the very City which, a few days after, was to clamor for his Blood. This day was one of glory to our Jesus, and the holy Church would have us renew, each year, the memory of this triumph of the Man-God. Shortly after the Birth of our Emmanuel, we saw the Magi coming from the extreme East, and looking in Jerusalem for the King of the Jews, to whom they intended offering their gifts and their adoration: but it is Jerusalem herself that now goes forth to meet this King. Each of these events is an acknowledgement of the Kingship of Jesus: the first, from the Gentiles; the second, from the Jews. Both were to pay him this regal homage before he suffered his Passion…

…Jesus begins his reign upon the earth this very day; and though the first Israel is soon to disclaim his rule, a new Israel, formed from the faithful few of the old, shall rise up in every nation of the earth, and become the Kingdom of Christ, a kingdom such as no mere earthly monarch ever coveted in his wildest fancies of ambition.”

Sunday is Palm Sunday when the faithful greet Our Lord in His triumphant entry into Jerusalem. What Mass will you be attending Palm Sunday?

Traditional Triduum and Confirmation Cancellations

As we are now in Passiontide, with Holy Week coming next week, we have received many inquiries about the status of our prayer campaign to restore the traditional Easter Triduum. 

Since early February, the CLMC has sent three letters requesting that the traditional Easter Triduum be restored.  There was even a brief unexpected meeting with Bishop Jugis on the steps of the Cathedral on March 25th where at this meeting, His Excellency stated that he felt that cancelling the Triduum was mandated from Rome (see attached letter).  Although, he didn’t seem to be aware that many dioceses, like the diocese of Rome (the Holy Father’s own diocese) have reinstated the traditional Easter Triduum.  Even the (quite un-traditional) dioceses of Washington DC, Atlanta, Chicago, and New York City will all have a traditional Easter Triduum provided for their faithful next week.  The diocese of Charlotte was the only diocese we could find that is cancelling the traditional Easter Triduum. 

While waiting for a reply, we also learned that in addition to the cancelling of the Easter Triduum, the traditional rite of Confirmation scheduled for July is now also cancelled. 

We recall that in July of last year, the Vicar General, Monsignor Winslow, replied in writing, assuring us that the bishop would meet with our community prior to making any changes.

This week, however, the bishop’s secretary relayed His Excellency’s short reply to our letters, which he stated, “Nothing has changed.”  We presume he means that his cancellation will remain in effect.  This reply is heartbreaking.

Moreover, we have even been told by a priest that more restrictions may be coming. This begs the question: If the Triduum and Confirmations can be so easily canceled – what about baptisms, requiems, extreme unction, nuptials, or even Sunday Latin Masses?  We must prepare for this possibility. 

The bishop’s decision unfortunately scatters our community, pushing families to travel to nearby dioceses or attend an Easter Triduum offered by the Society of St. Pius X.  For those searching for Easter Triduum alternatives, you can find Latin Mass schedules at this website:  https://latinmass.com/tlmfinder

Regretfully, this moment of crisis could have been averted. Over the past eight years, the CLMC contacted the diocese on multiple occasions expressing our concerns about the vulnerability of our community to potential restrictions from Rome and requested various canonical protections, up to and including, asking the bishop to invite a traditional religious community into the diocese to staff a dedicated parish. Sadly, our concerns and requests were ignored.

We have not shared these communications publicly to give the diocese and bishop discretion in such matters, but after eight years of unanswered pleas and two major sacramental cancellations, we believe the Latin Mass faithful have a right to know how we arrived at this moment.

Many people have contacted us asking what they can do.  As sad as this situation is for us to accept, we do see a path forward which we can share with you after Easter.  For now we turn our focus to Passiontide and Our Lord’s triumphal entry into Jerusalem on Sunday.

Passion Sunday (1st Sunday Mass – Salisbury)

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Sunday marks the beginning of the 2 week period within Lent called Passiontide, where the faithful focus more specifically on Our Blessed Lord’s Passion. As noted by Dr. Mike Foley, images are veiled, and the Judica Me, and the Gloria Patri, are omitted from the Mass henceforth until Easter, as noted in his weekly commentary on Sunday’s propers: http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/03/the-secret-for-passion-sunday.html

First Sunday Latin Mass at Salisbury (4pm)

There will be a 4pm Latin Mass today Sunday April 3rd at Sacred Heart parish in Salisbury.  Fr. Alfonso Gamez will offer the Mass. There will not be a social afterwards. To stay updated on the Salisbury Latin Mass Community visit: http://salisburylmc.org/

Holy Face Devotions Monday & Tuesdays

Mondays 2-3pm, St. Mark parish; Tuesdays after 7am Novus Ordo Mass in St. Ann chapel (around or after 7:30 or so). The Holy Face devotion is a powerful reparation for sins of blasphemy, violations of Sundays, and communism. With Passiontide upon us, meditating on the Holy Face of Our Lord can help appease Our Lord for the injustices He received.Incidentally, TAN Books is about to publish a new book (endorsed by Bishop Schneider) on the Holy Face: The Secret of the Holy Face: The Devotion Destined to Save Society -by Fr. Lawrence Carny. https://tanbooks.com/products/books/tan-books/pre-order/the-secret-of-the-holy-face/

Charlotte Diocese Cancels ALL Traditional Confirmations

According to St. Ann parish, by order of Bishop Jugis, all Traditional Latin Confirmations in the diocese of Charlotte are now canceled based on His Excellency’s interpretation of Traditiones Custodes. We share an excerpt of the bishop’s letter to Fr. Reid that the parish e-mailed families, explaining Bishop Jugis’ decision:

“It is [Bishop Jugis’] understanding in light of the recent motu proprio Traditiones Custodes and the subsequent clarifications from the Office of Divine Worship, that bishops should no longer authorize confirmation according to the preconciliar liturgical rites. Such prerogatives have been given to personal parishes and the traditional communities that serve them.” 

CLMC note: CLMC plans to issue a formal statement on this matter this coming week. Please keep Bishop Jugis in your prayers as he finds himself is a most difficult situation which continues to deepen. It should be noted that “traditional communities” referenced in the second part of this excerpt are likely referring to the “Ecclesia Dei” communities, e.g. parishes that are served by priests of the Institute of the Good Shephard, Institute of Christ the King Sovereign Priest, or Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter (FSSP). Those congregations, parishes and their priests may continue to administer the Traditional Latin Confirmation without restrictions…

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • Our Holy Emperor in Heaven: For some of the newcomers to the Latin Mass may ask, why does the CLMC, and other Latin Mass attendees have a devotion to a recently beatified Emperor (2004). What’s the connection to the Latin Mass and tradition? Well, OnePeterFive has a helpful article examining the link between Blessed Karl (whose anniversary of death was Friday) and the Latin Mass and its adherents: https://onepeterfive.com/holy-emperor-heaven/

Passiontide – Dom Prosper Gueranger

To close this update, we want to close with Dom Prosper Gueranger, OSB, the great 19th century Benedictine liturgist who wrote in The Liturgical Year, this reflection, which we excerpt for brevity:

During the preceding four weeks, we have noticed how the malice of Jesus’ enemies has been gradually increasing. His very presence irritates them; and it is evident that any little circumstance will suffice to bring the deep and long nurtured hatred to a head. The kind and gentle manners of Jesus are drawing to him all hearts that are simple and upright; at the same time, the humble life he leads, and the stern purity of his doctrines, are perpetual sources of vexation and anger, both to the proud Jew that looks forward to the Messias being a mighty conqueror, and to the Pharisee, who corrupts the Law of God, that he may make it the instrument of his own base passions. Still, Jesus goes on working miracles; his discourses are more than ever energetic; his prophecies foretell the fall of Jerusalem, and such a destruction of its famous Temple that not a stone is to be left on stone.

Everything around us urges us to mourn. The images of the Saints, the very crucifix on our Altar, are veiled from our sight. The Church is oppressed with grief. During the first four weeks of Lent, she compassionated her Jesus fasting in the desert; his coming Sufferings and Crucifixion and Death are what now fill her with anguish.

This Sunday is called Passion Sunday, because the Church begins on this day to make the Sufferings of our Redeemer her chief thought. It is called also Judica, from the first word of the Introit of the Mass; and again, Neomania, that is, the Sunday of the new (or, the Easter) moon, because it always falls after the new moon which regulates the Feast of Easter Day.

Weekend Latin Mass Update

Laudetur Iesus Christus! We have a few updates heading into this weekend we wanted to share:

Friday April 1, 2022: 100th Anniversary of Blessed Karl’s Death (Friday 12:30pm, St. Mark)

Friday is the 100th anniversary of Blessed Karl of Austria’s passage into eternal life. Overthrown by western powers – including Woodrow Wilson – the last reigning Catholic monarch of Europe was exiled to the Portuguese Island of Madeira, where his health declined and died on April 1, 1922.  Several CLMC readers have a devotion to this beatified emperor and Bishop Athanasius Schneider and Fr. Matlak have both given talks about Blessed Karl at St. Ann parish in recent years. St. Mark parish will offer its regular 12:30pm Latin Mass, and will offer prayers for his canonization after Mass. All are welcome to join.

If you can’t make it, you can also pray one of the prayers here: https://www.emperorcharles.org/prayers

First Saturday Mass – Saturday April 2, 10am (St. Thomas)

While the world waits to see if the consecration of Russia is accepted by Our Lady, the importance of the Fatima message has not ended.  All are called to practice the 1st Saturday devotions as requested by Our Lady of Fatima. Our Lady asks the faithful to do the following on each 1st Saturday for five consecutive months (e.g. five consecutive first Saturdays): Receive Holy Communion; pray the Rosary; meditate for 15 minutes on a mystery of the Rosary; and go to Confession (before or after 8 days). This is all done with the intention to offer reparation for blasphemies against the Immaculate Heart of Mary.  https://www.livefatima.io/five-first-saturdays/ If you are concerned about the future of the Latin Mass, the crisis in the Church, or conflicts overseas, please consider practicing the first Saturday devotions.

St. Thomas Aquinas parish offers a 10am first Saturday Latin Mass on Saturday April 2nd. Mass is followed by a blessing of religious objects in the traditional rite

Bishop Schneider Releases a New Prayer for the Hastening the Triumph of the Immaculate Heart

Bishop Athanasius Schneider, who visited the CLMC and St. Ann parish in 2017, has just released a new prayer which he is encouraging all faithful Catholics to pray for the coming of the Triumph of the Immaculate Heart. We attach a copy of his prayer, and also link to it below:

First Sunday Mass at Sacred Heart in Salisbury (Sunday April 3, 4pm)

UPDATE: The first Sunday Salisbury Latin Mass will Sunday April 3rd at 4pm. Fr. Alfonso Gamez will offer the Mass. There will not be a social afterwards.

Prayer for the Hastening of the Triumph of the Immaculate Heart of Mary

O Immaculate Heart of Mary, Holy Mother of God, and our tender Mother, look upon the distress in which the whole of mankind is living due to the spread of materialism, godlessness, and the persecution of the Catholic Faith.

In our own day, the Mystical Body of Christ is bleeding from so many wounds caused within the Church by the unpunished spread of heresies, the justification of sins against the Sixth Commandment, the seeking of the kingdom of earth rather than that of heaven, the horrendous sacrileges against the Most Holy Eucharist, especially through the practice of Communion in the hand, and the Protestant shaping of the celebration of the Holy Mass.

Amidst these trials appeared the light of the consecration of Russia to thine Immaculate Heart by the Pope, in union with the world’s bishops. In Fatima thou didst request the Communion of Reparation on the First Saturdays of the month. Implore thy Divine Son to grant a special grace to the Pope, that he might approve the Communion of Reparation on the First Saturdays.

May Almighty God hasten the time when Russia will convert to Catholic unity, mankind will be given a time of peace, and the Church will be granted an authentic renewal in the purity of the Catholic Faith, the sacredness of divine worship, and the holiness of Christian life. O Mediatrix of all graces, O Queen of the Most Holy Rosary, and our sweet Mother, turn thine eyes of mercy towards us and graciously hear this our trusting prayer. Amen

+ Athanasius Schneider, Auxiliary Bishop of the Archdiocese of Saint Mary in Astana Confraternity of Our Lady of Fatima

Laetare Sunday (4th Sunday of Lent)

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Sunday is the fourth Sunday of Lent, otherwise known Laetare Sunday, which in Latin means rejoice, and rose vestments are worn instead of violet, all to give the faithful encouragement that the joys of Easter and the resurrection are not far away. This is the midpoint of Lent, and as custom we provide Dr. Mike Foley’s commentary: https://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/03/the-consoling-collect-of-laetare-sunday.html#.Yj_c6zUpCHs

For more on the customs of Laetare Sunday visit: https://www.fisheaters.com/customslent7.html

Six Sundays to Restore the Triduum

This Lent, in order to pray and sacrifice to help restore the canceled Latin Triduum, we are encourage all CLMC readers who are not currently attending the Sunday Latin Mass regularly, to consider making the sacrifice and join us each Sunday during Lent and pray for the Triduum’s restoration.  For those who have started to do this, we thank you. For those not yet attending on Sundays, we encourage you to consider it while Lent continues.  The attached flyer lists all of the diocesan Latin Masses in the Diocese of Charlotte.  The priests at St. Ann and St. Thomas Aquinas parishes (and others) will also be praying a Memorare after the Latin Mass on certain days for the protection of the Latin Mass: https://charlottelatinmass.org/2022/03/01/six-sundays-to-restore-the-latin-triduum/

CLMC Interview on Catholic Radio

As noted yesterday, the CLMC was interviewed on Jason Murphy’s show, The Obligation, on Carolina Catholic Radio 1270AM and discussed the Latin Mass, the Triduum cancellation, and the distinctness of the Mass of Ages: https://charlottelatinmass.org/2022/03/26/clmc-interview-on-catholic-radio/

Holy Face Devotions at St. Mark and St. Ann parishes

There are now two Holy Face devotions occurring weekly in Charlotte. Once has started at St. Ann parish. It will occur on Tuesdays after the 7am Novus Ordo Mass (a few minutes after 7:30am) in the chapel. The prayers may take 45 minutes.  As mentioned in prior weeks, St. Mark parish offers its Holy Face devotion on Mondays from 2-3pm. Attend as your schedule permits.  The primary purpose of this apostolate is to, by praying certain prayers, make reparation for the sins committed against the first three Commandments of the Lord: The denial of God by atheism (communism), blasphemy, and the profanation of Sundays and Holy Days. Devotion to the Holy Face has been referred to as the devotion for Jesus Crucified. 

First Saturday Mass – April 2, 10am (St. Thomas)

As many know, Pope Francis, with Bishop Jugis and others joining, consecrated Russia and Ukraine to the Immaculate Heart of Mary on Friday. Now the world waits to see if it was accepted by Our Lady. However the consecration does not end the Fatima message – as all are called to practice the 1st Saturday devotions as requested by Our Lady of Fatima. Our Lady asks us to do the following on each 1st Saturday for five consecutive months: Receive Holy Communion; pray the Rosary; meditate for 15 minutes on a mystery of the Rosary; and go to Confession (before or after 8 days). This is all done with the intention to offer reparation for blasphemies against the Immaculate Heart of Mary.  

To assist with this, St. Thomas Aquinas parish offers a 10am first Saturday Latin Mass on Saturday April 2nd. Mass is followed by a blessing of religious objects in the traditional rite

Friday April 1, 2022: 100th Anniversary of Blessed Karl’s Death (Friday 12:30pm, St. Mark)

This coming Friday is not only first Friday, but it also happens to be the centenary of Blessed Karl of Austria’s passage into eternal life. Overthrown by western powers – including Woodrow Wilson – the last reigning Catholic monarch of Europe was exiled to the Portuguese Island of Madeira, where his health declined and died on April 1, 1922.  Several CLMC readers have a devotion to this beatified emperor, and in 2017 we invited Bishop Athanasius Schneider to Charlotte to commemorate Bl. Karl. He was known as the peace emperor in trying to end World War I, and as Fr. Matlak noted in 2020, Bl. Karl reigned over part of Ukraine during his short tenure as emperor. He rejected Germany’s request that he allow passage of Vladimir Lenin through Austria to Russia to help foment communist revolution (Lenin took another route). He is an ideal blessed to implore aid against the crisis overseas.

Moreover, as Suzanne Pearson of the Blessed Karl league notes he has a connection to Our Lady of Fatima. Blessed Karl reigned during Our Lady of Fatima’s apparitions of 1917, and was truly living Our Lady’s message that she spoke 1,700 miles away in Portugal. It seems quite interesting that his centenary comes 1 week after Pope Francis’ consecration of Russia, and the day before 1st Saturday.  

St. Mark parish will offer its regular 12:30pm Low Mass (Friday of the 4th Week of Lent) and to commemorate Bl. Karl’s death, a portrait of him will be placed near the sanctuary for veneration after Mass.

Latin Mass & Traditional News

The Messenger Angel: Dr. Mike Foley pens an article about the last Thursday’s feast of St. Gabriel, which is celebrated as a standalone feast in the Traditional Latin Mass, and the day prior to the Annunciation: https://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2022/03/the-messenger-angel.html#.Yj0wQjUpCHs

The Expectant Orations of the Feast of the Annunciation: Dr. Foley also wrote a follow up article the next day on the prayers offered for the feast of the Annunciation: https://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2022/03/the-expectant-orations-of-feast-of.html#.Yj_zlTUpCHt

The Story of Susanna in the Liturgy of Lent: In the Traditional Latin Mass, the readings for each day of Lent are linked to a specific church in Rome where pilgrims in Rome can visit and attend Mass that day. These churches are called Stational Churches, and the readings for Mass of that day, are sometimes linked to the name of the stational church. For the Saturday of the 3rd week in Lent (March 26), the stational church is St. Susanna church, and the epistle is notably taken from the book of Daniel, specifically the chapter detailing with the false witness against the pious wife Susanna who was falsely accused of adultery. Greg DiPippo of New Liturgical Movement provides fascinating background for yesterday’s reading and its connection to the stational church for the day: https://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2022/03/the-story-of-susanna-in-liturgy-of-lent.html#.Yj_YtjUpCHs

Ecclesiastical Architect and Benedictine Monk: Fr. Michael McInerney, O.S.B.: Local writer John Paul Sonnen has a informative piece on Belmont Abbey’s Fr. Michael McInerney O.S.B., who was a noted architect in his day and helped designed some of the traditional architecture at the Abbey in the early 1900s, a style called “American Benedictine”. This “monk-architect” also designed the original St. Michael’s parish in Gastonia, and the newer Sisters of Mercy building in Belmont, among many places in the US: https://www.liturgicalartsjournal.com/2022/03/ecclesiastical-architect-and.html

Cardinal Nichols approves Latin Triduum in London: https://lms.org.uk/civicrm/event/info?id=209&reset=1

Easter Triduum Actions

As we wait to hear from Bishop Jugis on the CLMC’s request to restore the Latin Triduum, we have been asked if there is anything else that can be done besides praying and sacrificing? There are a few things that one could do if you felt called to do more.

  1. Write Bishop Jugis: His Excellency Peter J. Jugis, Diocese of Charlotte, 1123 S. Church Street, Charlotte, NC 28203 (Dear Your Excellency)
  2. Participate in your parish Synod: It’s important for Church leaders to hear of the needs of the faithful. One way to do that is to participate in your parish’s Synod occurring over the next few week. Contact one’s parish to find out when it will occur and how to participate.
  3. Diocesan Support Appeal: Let God guide your decision on your participation in the Diocesan Support Appeal.  Donations can be an effective form of communication.  God may guide you to change your donation amount or to place stipulations on your donation.

It should be made clear that the Latin Triduum was not canceled by Pope Francis but by Bishop Jugis. As noted above, most other dioceses that offer a Latin Triduum are moving ahead with theirs. Even the Pope’s own diocese, the Diocese of Rome, has restored their Latin Easter Triduum.  Charlotte is the outlier. Please pray especially for Bishop Jugis, he is a prayerful bishop in a difficult situation.

It’s Sunday, what Mass are you attending today?

CLMC interview on Catholic Radio

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Earlier this week the CLMC was interviewed on Jason Murphy’s The Obligation radio show, which airs on the local Carolina Catholic radio station (1270am – now back on the air) to discuss the CLMC and the future of the Latin Mass in Charlotte.

The interview aired yesterday afternoon, but you can listen to the replay here: https://www.podpage.com/carolina-catholic-radio-podcast/the-obligation-show-71-03-25-22-interview-with-chris-lauer-and-mike-fitzgerald/

Here is the description:

In this episode Jason sits down with Chris Lauer and Mike FitzGerald who are two of the founders of the Charlotte Latin Mass Community.  The Charlotte Latin Mass Community (CLMC) is a group of faithful laity who supports and promotes the Traditional Latin Mass (Mass in the Extraordinary Form) in the Diocese of Charlotte, specifically in the Charlotte metro area. Jason, Chris, and Mike discuss liturgical changes made as a result of Vatican II and subsequent abuses which led to the Ecclesia Dei Commission in 1988 to address concerns and needs of Traditional Catholics.  We discuss the founding and history of the Latin Mass Community in Charlotte and some of the recent difficulties due to restrictions placed on its liturgies stemming from Pope Francis’ motu proprio Traditiones Custodes in July of 2021.    

Lastly, please check out other episodes of The Obligation, which include interviews with other local Catholics, including some who attend the Latin Mass:

https://www.podpage.com/carolina-catholic-radio-podcast/category/the-obligation/

Feast of Annunciation & Triduum Update

Laudetur Iesus Christus! With the feast of the Annunciation, and the consecration of Russia occurring this Friday, we wanted to share the diocesan Latin Masses in the region along with other updates.

The Feast of the Annunciation Latin Masses – Friday March 25

It should also be noted that in the traditional calendar, March 24 is the feast of St. Gabriel the Archangel. St. Thomas Aquinas parish will offer a 7pm Latin Mass as custom. Below we provide Dom Prosper Gueranger’s commentary on the two feast days:

Bishop Schneider’s new interview on the consecration of Russia: https://onepeterfive.com/bishop-schneider-pope-francis-consecration-russia-ukraine/

Please continue to pray and fast for Pope Francis as he prepares to make the consecration – one can only imagine the spiritual obstacles he faces over the next 48 hours.

Respect Life Latin Mass – Saturday March 26, 8am

St. Ann parish will offer a Latin Mass 8am this Saturday March 26 for an end to abortion, followed by prayers at Planned Parenthood abortion facility (700 S. Torrence Street, Charlotte). For those unable to attend, a Holy Hour of Reparation will be offered in the church after Mass.

Juventutem Young Adults Event – Saturday March 26, 6pm

Juventutem, the Latin Mass young adults group is hosting an event on Saturday at the Cathedral starting at 6pm (see details below).  For questions or more visit: https://www.facebook.com/JuventutemCLT    

At 6pm we will gather at the Marian grotto behind St. Patrick’s School to pray Vespers in Latin. Following prayer, we will walk over to the Youth Room at 6:30pm for a talk on iconography by guest speaker, Rachel Willoughby. Learn about this Sacred Christian art form full of complex layers, symbolism, and meaning! There is also the potential for a future offering of a multi-session icon painting workshop.

Easter Triduum Actions

As we wait to hear from Bishop Jugis on the CLMC’s request to restore the Latin Triduum, we have been asked if there is anything else that can be done besides praying and sacrificing? There are a few things that one could do if you felt called to do more.

  1. Write Bishop Jugis: His Excellency Peter J. Jugis, Diocese of Charlotte, 1123 S. Church Street, Charlotte, NC 28203 (Dear Your Excellency)
  2. Participate in your parish Synod: It’s important for Church leaders to hear of the needs of the faithful. One way to do that is to participate in your parish’s Synod occurring over the next few week. Contact one’s parish to find out when it will occur and how to participate.
  3. Diocesan Support Appeal: Let God guide your decision on your participation in the Diocesan Support Appeal.  Donations can be an effective form of communication.  God may guide you to change your donation amount or to place stipulations on your donation.

It should be made clear that the Triduum was not canceled by Pope Francis but by Bishop Jugis. Most other dioceses that offer a Latin Triduum are moving ahead with theirs. Even the Pope’s own diocese, the Diocese of Rome, has restored their Latin Easter Triduum.  Charlotte is the outlier. Please pray for Bishop Jugis, he is a prayerful bishop in a difficult situation.

We invite everyone to continue praying and sacrificing – especially by attending Sunday Latin Mass – for the restoration of the Latin Triduum.

3rd Sunday of Lent

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Sunday is the 3rd Sunday of Lent, and as custom, Dr. Mike Foley offers commentary for the Collect: http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/03/the-taciturn-collect-for-third-sunday.html

Six Sundays to Restore the Triduum

This Lent, in order to pray and sacrifice to help restore the canceled Latin Triduum, we are encourage all CLMC readers who are not currently attending the Sunday Latin Mass regularly, to consider making the sacrifice and join us each Sunday during Lent and pray for the Triduum’s restoration.  For those who have started to do this, we thank you. For those not yet attending on Sundays, we encourage you to consider it while Lent continues.  The attached flyer lists all of the diocesan Latin Masses in the Diocese of Charlotte.  The priests at St. Ann and St. Thomas Aquinas parishes (and others) will also be praying a Memorare after the Latin Mass on certain days for the protection of the Latin Mass: https://charlottelatinmass.org/2022/03/01/six-sundays-to-restore-the-latin-triduum/

Juventutem Young Adults Event – This Saturday March 26, 6pm

Juventutem, the young adults group centered around the Traditional Latin Mass is organizing traditional Latin Vespers at 6pm and afterwards a talk on iconography at the Cathedral this Saturday March 26 at 6:30pm (Cathedral Youth Room). Vespers will be prayed prior at 6pm near the Marion Grotto behind the school (on the backside of the parish).  Please see announcement below. For questions visit their Facebook page at: https://www.facebook.com/JuventutemCLT  

At 6pm we will gather at the Marian grotto behind St. Patrick’s School to pray Vespers in Latin. Following prayer, we will walk over to the Youth Room at 6:30pm for a talk on iconography by guest speaker, Rachel Willoughby. Learn about this Sacred Christian art form full of complex layers, symbolism, and meaning! There is also the potential for a future offering of a multi-session icon painting workshop.

**New Holy Face Devotion Begins at St. Ann – Tuesdays around 7:30am**

We are pleased to share that a Holy Face devotion has started at St. Ann parish. It will occur weekly in the chapel after the Tuesday 7am Novus Ordo Mass. The time is not exact, but it probably starts a few minutes after 7:30am. The prayers may take 45-60 minutes.  As mentioned in prior weeks, St. Mark parish offers its Holy Face devotion on Mondays from 2-3pm. Attend as your schedule permits.

As background, in 1843, Sr. Mary of St. Peter, a Carmelite nun in the monastery in Tours, France, received a series of revelations from Jesus telling her that reparation for certain sins were an imperative, and that it was to be done through devotion to the Holy Face.  The primary purpose of this apostolate is to, by praying certain prayers, make reparation for the sins committed against the first three Commandments of the Lord: The denial of God by atheism (communism), blasphemy, and the profanation of Sundays and Holy Days. Devotion to the Holy Face has been referred to as the devotion for Jesus Crucified. 

Feast of St. Joseph – March 19

We would be remiss if we did not honor, St. Joseph, who’s feast day was Saturday. Below are a few recommended links about his life and devotion.

CLMC note: It was regrettable that no diocesan Latin Mass was offered for the feast of St. Joseph in Charlotte (the CLMC did ask). Sadly though, this was not an isolated incident. In recent months we’ve seen Latin Masses bumped, canceled or omitted beyond the normal reasons (e.g. travel or illness). In years past, there seemed to be a plethora of priests available to offer Latin Mass, even on a moment’s notice.  While we do not direct any criticism at individual priests (it was a challenging week for many of our great priests), we are growing concerned that the diocese overall may be faltering in its commitment to the Latin Mass in Charlotte. Motu Proprio aside, it does raise the question: is this just a brief rough patch, or is the diocese’s liturgical framework revealing a weakness? Whether the Triduum is restored, and no further restrictions issued, may be a helpful benchmark on the state of the Latin Mass in Charlotte.

Solemn High Masses Every Sunday 12 Noon at Prince of Peace Parish

South of the border, we are pleased to share that Prince of Peace parish in Taylors, SC (2 hours southwest of Charlotte) is offering a Solemn High Latin Mass each Sunday in Lent. Masses are at 12 noon. Incidentally Prince of Peace parish offers a Latin Mass 7 days a week – something parishes in our diocese have yet to achieve (please pray).  The parish is located at 1209 Brushy Creek Road, Taylors, SC (https://princeofpeacetaylors.org/).

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • Dr. Kwasniewski Releases New Book on Obedience: We are pleased to share that Dr. Peter Kwasniewski (whom the CLMC hosted last fall) has just released his new book entitled True Obedience in the Church: A Guide to Discernment in Challenging Times. The book helps to clear up misconceptions about what the virtue of obedience is and what it is not. Often times we find clergy or even seminarians blindly following orders of a superior beyond when it is obligatory or even spiritually healthy to do so, as we saw during COVID: https://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2022/03/i-am-happy-to-announce-release-of-my.html#more  Dr. Kwasniewski also set up a website with articles and excerpts: https://trueobedience.com/
  • Is It Laudable to Promote Unapproved Marian Apparitions?: With all the discussion about the Fatima apparitions, it raises questions on whether unapproved Marian apparitions should be promoted. As we find in this sermon by a traditional priest (in good standing with his bishop), the answer is no. This pious priest details the spiritual dangers associated with an unapproved apparition. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HXJbH3qX85w  On the general topic, exorcist Fr. Chad Ripperger explains in a talk, how the Church properly discerns apparitions: https://youtu.be/Q73aoHXsLq0?t=366
  • Mass of Ages Episode 2 – The Perfect Storm: Last summer a documentary on the Latin Mass entitled, Mass of Ages, was released with great fanfare. The producers now have announced a sequel entitled Mass of Ages Episode 2: The Perfect Storm.  Judging by the trailer, it looks intriguing as the documentary investigates at the immediate aftermath of Vatican II, and specifically the role that controversial Archbishop Annibale Bugnini played in “designing” the Novus Ordo Mass. View the trailer here: https://youtu.be/ypYexwqqHTM

Bishop Jugis to Join Pope Francis in Consecrating Russia (and Ukraine) to the Immaculate Heart of Mary

If there is one Marian apparition taking prominence in the Church, it’s Our Lady of Fatima and her request that the Pope consecrate Russia to her Immaculate Heart to prevent a worldwide chastisement. As many know, at the behest of the Ukrainian Catholic Bishops, Pope Francis agreed to do this on the feast of the Annunciation Friday March 25 at 12 noon (5pm Rome).

Thankfully, Bishop Jugis has announced he will join in Pope Francis’ consecration of Russia at 12 noon Eastern (5pm Rome) and the bishop will lead the consecration prayer at the Cathedral at 12 noon. The bishop has invited other priests to join in at their parishes. If we hear of any specific plans, we will share them with our readers. Here are some information:

  • Novena Prayer for Consecration (concludes Thursday March 24): We thank everyone who is praying a novena imploring Our Lady that Pope Francis offers the consecration, as Our Lady requested. If you haven’t joined in, you can still do so as we complete the novena on Thursday: https://www.livefatima.io/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/PrayerCard_09.pdf (Novena is attached)

CLMC note: One can not fully emphasize the epochal moment we may be arriving at, God willing, next Friday. Please consider joining in prayer, penance, and the novena.

For nearly 100 years, prayers were and still are offered at the end of each Low Mass for the conversion of Russia. What Mass are you attending Sunday?

7am St. Ann Latin Mass cancelled tomorrow Friday March 18

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Tomorrow’s 7am Low Mass at St. Ann is canceled as Fr. Jones remains under the weather and Fr. Reid is away (please pray for both of them). For alternatives, St. Mark offers a 12:30pm Low Mass each Friday.

Looking ahead to Saturday March 19, the feast of St. Joseph, we post the updated listing of St. Joseph Latin Masses in the region.

Latin Masses for the Feast of St. Joseph (Saturday March 19)

8am – Prince of Peace parish, Taylors, SC (2 hours southwest of Charlotte)

9am – St. Margaret Mary parish, Swannanoa, NC (2 hours northwest of Charlotte) – this will be a High Mass

10am – Our Lady of the Lake parish, Chapin, SC (1.75 hours south of Charlotte) (Home of our friends with the Columbia Traditional Latin Mass Supporters)

2pm – St. Elizabeth in the Hill Country parish, Boone, NC (2 hours northwest of Charlotte)

Regretfully, at this time, there are no diocesan Latin Masses scheduled in the Charlotte area on Saturday.  This is most unusual. Please offer a prayer to St. Joseph that a Latin Mass can be scheduled.