2nd Sunday After Epiphany

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Today is the 2nd Sunday after Epiphany, and the liturgy commemorates the 3rd manifestation or mystery of Epiphany, Christ manifesting His divinity at the wedding at Cana. Dr. Mike Foley provides his weekly commentary on the prayers this Sunday. http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/01/the-orations-of-second-sunday-after.html

Of particular note is a translation is today’s Collect, which as Dr. Foley notes, continues the Christmas prayer of peace, which we may want to pray considering all that is occurring in our country now:

Almighty and everlasting God, who dost moderate things in heaven as well as on earth, mercifully hear the supplications of Thy people, and grant us Thy peace in our times. Through our Lord.

Upcoming Latin Mass events

Respect Life Latin Mass – Saturday January 23The St. Ann parish 4th Saturday Respect Life Latin Mass will resume this month. 8:00 AM Low Mass, followed by prayers at Planned Parenthood abortion facility (or Holy Hour of Reparation).

End of Christmas celebration – Sunday January 24Please join us on Sunday January 24 for the annual “End of Christmas” celebration, with the Cantate Domino Latin Girls Choir and some deserts. This will occur after the 12:30pm St. Ann Sunday Latin Mass.

Septuagesima (Pre-Lent) Season begins – Sunday January 31: With Easter occurring early this year, the three week pre-Lent season of Septuagesima will actually begin before the close of the Christmas season, on Sunday January 31. We will begin to see violet vestments and the absence of the Alleluia, as a subtle reminder to begin preparing for Lent (which begins Ash Wednesday February 17)

Candlemas – Feast of the Purification – Tuesday February 2: St. Ann will offer a special 6pm High Mass for the Feast of the Purification of the Blessed Virgin Mary. This will include a procession, and also a blessing of candles. You may wish to begin to purchase candles 51% beeswax or greater. This will also mark the end of the Christmas season.

Lenten Spiritual Enrollment

The traditional Carmelite Hermits of Our Lady of Mt. Carmel in Fairfield, PA are again offering a special Lenten spiritual enrollment which you can begin to participate in today. The Hermits will be offering 40 Masses, 40 days of praying the Divine Office (and other daily prayers), and 40 days of fasting and penance all for the intention of your family or other enrolled loved ones.  This is an amazing spiritual gift. Here is the link to the enrollment form: http://www.ednmc.org/

Please make an offering of alms along with this enrollment.  Your generous financial sacrifice will bear all the more fruit for your intentions.

Latin Mass and Traditional News

  • The Demographics of the Traditional Latin Mass: Great article by Dr. Joseph Shaw, chair of the Latin Mass Society of the U.K. on how the young now make up a substantial portion of the Traditional Latin Mass attendance: https://www.hprweb.com/2021/01/the-demographics-of-the-extraordinary-form/#respond
  • Roberto de Mattei – True and False Conspiracies: Traditional Catholic historian Roberto de Mattei has an interesting article on the conspiracy theories swirling around the French Revolution period, and also occurring with this week’s political turmoil: https://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2021/01/de-mattei-true-and-false-conspiracies.html
  • Pope Francis decrees on women as acolytes and lectors: If one were still “on the fence” about the “fruits” of Vatican II, this new decision should be helpful in guiding one to the traditional Catholic perspective and Latin Mass. Prior to Vatican II, the roles of acolytes and lectors were reserved for men in minor orders (those in the early part of seminary) – and this is still the case for seminaries exclusively devoted to the liturgical books of 1962 (Traditional Latin Mass). Unfortunately, for the Novus Ordo liturgy, layman can be installed in these positions, and now the Holy Father is permitting women to serve as these functions for the Novus Ordo. If you aren’t attending the Latin Mass – especially on Sundays, now might be a good time to abandon the Novus Ordo:
    https://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2021/01/earthquake-francis-decrees-women-can.html

Modernism vs. Traditional Catholicism: The COVID-19 Vaccine

As we’ve noted in the past, the promotion of the Traditional Latin Mass is not limited to just liturgy, but also includes the traditions, customs, culture, spirituality, philosophy, and theology that accompanied the Mass of Ages, which differs vastly from the Novus Ordo Mass and Post-Vatican II mindset. Here we examine a contemporary topic of the COVID vaccine that highlights the differences:

Fr. Chad Ripperger on the Morality of Vaccines: Last week we highlighted the problem of many in the Church who blindly believe in naturalism or science, over the supernatural and perennial Catholic faith. This is now particularly evident over the COVID-19 vaccine, in which some in the Church are saying it’s “morally permissible” to receive a vaccine linked to abortion (derived or tested). Fr. Ripperger explains how this is not the case. In short, in his theological opinion, the only condition to use an aborted linked vaccine would be in a dire situation where 10-25% of the population were succumbing to a disease. That “grave situation” does not exist with COVID-19 (99% recovery rate), and as such “remote cooperation” with abortion cannot be justified. Fr. Ripperger provides a breath of fresh tradition to counter the modernist theologians and Catholic laity who continue to “accommodate the world” as they do with many other issues.  We invite you to spend time to watch this important interview with Fr. Ripperger:

https://sensusfidelium.us/resistance-podcast-143-answers-on-vaccination-concerns-w-fr-ripperger/

The Ends Cannot Justify the Means: We also re-share Bishop Schneider’s letter (with Bishop Strickland) who emphasize the traditional perspective that Catholics should have nothing to do with abortion or aborted linked vaccines: https://www.crisismagazine.com/2020/covid-vaccines-the-ends-cannot-justify-the-means

Archbishop Viganò’s Considerations on the promotion of the vaccine by the Holy See: Archbishop Viganò’s comments on the Vatican’s embrace of the COVID vaccine: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/fetzen-fliegen/item/5233-archbishop-vigano-s-considerations-on-the-promotion-of-the-vaccine-by-the-holy-see

A Warning About “Conservative Catholics”: Seeing the diverging viewpoints view on the COVID-19 vaccine, it should be clear that there is a battle between the traditional (perennial) and modernist perspective related to abortion linked vaccines (and many other issues). However, last fall Archbishop Vigano noted that the centrist, “conservative Catholics” were also “carrying water” for the modernist Revolutionaries “because, while rejecting their excesses, it shares the same principles.” Vigano goes on to note: “[I]n the ecclesial sphere, the deep church uses the moderate “conservatives” to give an appearance of offering freedom to the faithful.”  Many of these conservatives are well meaning and good-hearted people – as such, we should consider praying and encouraging all “conservative Catholics” to abandon the revolution and embrace the traditional Catholic Faith.

Traditional Teaching on Tithing

Counsels on Tithing – by Fr. Chad Ripperger: As we noted last week, for those of us St. Ann parish, we are blessed to have the Latin Mass and some of the related customs and traditions (like Wednesday’s Epiphany water blessing). However, we are also aware that not all CLMC readers are St. Ann parishioners and that some parishes are still unnecessarily limiting their sacramental functions due to “COVID”. In short if your parish is embracing strange beliefs, actions (or medical treatments) that harm the faith – you can always give to traditional religious orders instead of your parish.  For those of you who attend such parishes, we share with you an excellent talk by theologian Fr. Chad Ripperger on the Church’s traditional teaching on tithing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZueaGsLUbk4

Prayers for Our Country: Lastly, please continue to pray for our nation and the election process as things still remain unsettled. Continue to pray the Rosary, and these recommended prayers:

o   Prayer of Deliverance (recommended by exorcist Fr. Chad Ripperger): https://charlottelatinmass.files.wordpress.com/2020/11/deliverance-prayers-for-election.pdf

o   Prayer for the USA (recommended by Archbishop Viganò): https://charlottelatinmass.files.wordpress.com/2020/11/viganos-prayer-for-usa-pdf.pdf

Latin Mass Saturday & March for Life tomorrow

Laudetur Iesus Christus and blessed Epiphanytide greetings! Yesterday marked the Baptism of Our Lord Jesus Christ and the Octave of Epiphany, and now we begin the extended Christmastide season called Epiphanytide which lasts until February 2nd, the feast of the Presentation (or Purification). However for this year, the season will be cut short due to the pre-Lent season of Septuagesima beginning on Sunday January 31. For more information please see Fisheaters: https://www.fisheaters.com/customstimeafterepiphany1.html

Below are a few updates we have today:

Latin Mass at St. Michael parish this Saturday

We learned that a Latin Mass has been announced for this Saturday January 16 at 8:30am at St. Michael parish in Gastonia.

March for Life Charlotte tomorrow

The annual March for Life Charlotte will take place tomorrow at 12 noon in the parking lot across the street from the Diocesan Pastoral Center (1123 S. Church Street). People can gather beginning at 11am and the March will start shortly before noon. The march will go into uptown and have a rally at Trade & Tryon before returning back to the Pastoral Center parking lot. The keynote speaker is Fr. Noah Carter. Parking is available in the same lot as the gathering (across from 1123 S. Church Street) and also metered parking spaces along the streets or paid parking lots nearby. For more information visit: http://www.marchforlifecharlotte.org/

Respect Life Latin Mass – Saturday January 23

The St. Ann parish 4th Saturday Respect Life Latin Mass will resume this month. 8:00 AM Low Mass, followed by prayers at Planned Parenthood abortion facility (or Holy Hour of Reparation).

End of Christmas celebration – Sunday January 24

Please join us on Sunday January 24 for the annual “End of Christmas” celebration, with the Cantate Domino Latin Girls Choir and some deserts. This will occur after the 12:30pm St. Ann Sunday Latin Mass.

Prayers for Our Country: Lastly, please continue to pray for our nation and the election process as things still remain unsettled at this seemingly dark hour. Continue to pray the Rosary, and these recommended prayers:

 

Feast of the Holy Family

Laudetur Iesus Christus! We now are in the 5th day of the ancient octave of the Epiphany (which sadly was eliminated in the 1955 “reforms”).  As Dom Prosper Gueranger notes, this period is one of the four principal seasons of the Church:

The Epiphany shares with the Feasts of Christmas, Easter. Ascension, and Pentecost the honour of being called, in the Canon of the Mass, a Day most holy. It is also one of the cardinal Feasts, that is, one of those on which the arrangement of the Christian Year is based; for, as we have Sundays after Easter, and Sundays after Pentecost, so also we count six Sundays after the Epiphany.

Epiphany Home Blessing kits: We thank Fr. Reid (and Fr. Jones) for blessing Epiphany water, chalk and salt on Wednesday. If you missed out, the CLMC will provide home blessing kits containing chalk, salt, and instructions on how to bless one’s home (a custom during Epiphany season). Please stop by the table today to pick one up. There is also Epiphany water in the silver holy water font in the narthex – you can bring your own bottles to fill while quantities last. 

Feast of the Holy Family: Sunday after Epiphany is also the traditional feast of the Holy Family, and as Dr. Mike Foley notes in his weekly column on Sunday’s collect, it is fitting to commemorate it after Epiphany (as opposed to the Novus Ordo which places it after Christmas) so to give both feasts “breathing room” and due emphasis. With the family under assault from the culture of death, modernism, and the crisis in the Church, there is much that can be said for this important feast day. For now, we share Dr. Foley’s reflection here: http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/01/the-collect-of-feast-of-holy-family.html and also include a brief history from Fisheaters.com: https://www.fisheaters.com/customstimeafterepiphany1a.html

Wednesday January 13 – Feast of the Baptism of Our Lord: This Wednesday January 13 is the feast of the Baptism of Our Lord Jesus Christ. St. Ann will offer its normal 6pm Low Mass. This feast day commemorates the end of the main Christmas season (although the extended Christmas season of Epiphanytide continues traditionally until February 2nd), and marks the octave day of the Epiphany. It was believed the baptism occurred on January 6, hence its connection to Epiphany season. Fisheaters has more: https://www.fisheaters.com/baptism3.html

Sunday January 24 – End of Christmas Season Celebration: Please join us on Sunday January 24 for the annual “End of Christmas” celebration, with the Cantate Domino Latin Girls Choir and some deserts. This will occur after the 12:30pm St. Ann Latin Mass.

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • Counsels on Tithing – by Fr. Chad Ripperger: For those of us St. Ann parish, we are blessed to have the Latin Mass and some of the related customs and traditions (like Wednesday’s Epiphany water blessing). However, we are also aware that not all CLMC readers are St. Ann parishioners and that some parishes are still unnecessarily limiting their sacramental functions due to “COVID”. In short if your parish is embracing strange beliefs or actions that harm the faith – you can always give to traditional religious orders instead of your parish. For those of you who attend such parishes, we share with you an excellent talk by theologian Fr. Chad Ripperger on the Church’s traditional teaching on tithing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZueaGsLUbk4
  • A Traditional Perspective on the Human Face: As the world (and sadly some in the Church) strangely looks towards “science” to save us from a virus, which has roughly a 99% recovery rate, many are continuing to embrace the policy of masking the entire populous to halt a virus spread. While people can decide for themselves how best to protect their health, there are legitimate spiritual concerns about forcing masking upon the entire population, as Bishop Athanasius Schneider observed in this October interview: https://www.cfnews.org.uk/bishop-christians-must-refuse-covid-vaccine-derived-from-aborted-babies-even-if-it-means-martyrdom/
    • “The exterior sign of the mask which all the population has to wear is disproportionate. It’s an exterior sign that the entire population is submitted, and that those who govern us have now in their hands the entire population, really as obedient slaves and marionettes. This is very dangerous and should cause us deep concern.”
  • Fr. James Jackson, FSSP, a Latin Mass priest near Denver, Colorado has, in light of the debate, further examined the traditional dignity and beauty of the human face and its impact on the soul in three wonderful essays:

Rorate Caeli also posted an interesting article last month written by a religious sister on applying St. Thomas Aquinas’ Summa to the face mask issue:

  • Naturalistic vs. Supernatural Faith: The issue of Catholics placing false hope in science (and now an aborted-tainted vaccine) instead of God to cure our ills, is a continual problem that permeates the Church – even among some who like the Latin Mass. Sadly, it is the impact of Darwinism and molecules-to-man evolution that continues to falsely lead the faithful away from God and instead erroneously believing that only science and naturalism is the solution. Yet theology and philosophy are superior to the natural sciences – after all how can one study creation and its natural laws without a proper understanding of the Creator?

Darwinism is sadly still a major influence among those “conservative Catholics”, who are orthodox on big ticket doctrinal matters, but still retain elements of Darwinism and modernism in their outlook that limits how they can respond to the culture of death (and other matters such as theology or liturgy). To help counter this error and to gently encourage them to embrace the traditional teachings and theology of the Church, we cannot recommend enough to our readers, the Evolution & the Culture of Death conference the CLMC co-sponsored in November 2019 at St. Mark parish. Only when the Catholic faith is fully reintegrated back into science (and healthcare), can humanity progress:

https://sensusfidelium.us/evolution-the-culture-of-death-unmasking-the-roots-of-todays-abortion-movement/

  • Prayers for Our Country: Lastly, please continue to pray for our nation and the election process as things still remain unsettled at this seemingly dark hour. Continue to pray the Rosary, and these recommended prayers:

As Fr. Ripperger noted in an interview in November, the demon rages the most right before it is exorcised from the person. Let us also pray to St. Michael’s intercession to deliver us from the evil of today and for the full conversion of the United States to the Catholic Church.

Feast of the Epiphany

Laudetur Iesus Christus and blessed feast of the Epiphany. As liturgist Dom Prosper Gueranger notes, this is one of the cardinal feasts of the Church; it retains its own season, and like Easter and Pentecost, it has several Sundays named after it and its own octave. Gueranger also notes there are 3 mysteries of Christ celebrated on this day:

The mystery of the Epiphany brings upon us three magnificent rays of the Sun of Justice, our Saviour. In the calendar of pagan Rome, this Sixth day of January was devoted to the celebration of a triple triumph of Augustus, the founder of the Roman Empire: but when Jesus, our Prince of peace, whose empire knows no limits, had secured victory to his Church by the blood of the Martyrs, then did this his Church decree that a triple triumph of the Immortal King should be substituted, in the Christian Calendar, for those other three triumphs which had been won by the adopted son of Cæsar.

The Sixth of January, therefore, restored the celebration of our Lord’s Birth to the Twenty-Fifth of December; but in return, there were united in the one same Epiphany three manifestations of Jesus’ glory: the mystery of the Magi coming from the East, under the guidance of a star, and adoring the Infant of Bethlehem as the divine King; the mystery of the Baptism of Christ, who, whilst standing in the waters of the Jordan, was proclaimed by the Eternal Father as Son of God; and thirdly, the mystery of the divine power of this same Jesus, when he changed the water into wine at the marriage-feast of Cana. 

https://sensusfidelium.us/the-liturgical-year-dom-prosper-gueranger/christmas/the-epiphany-of-our-lord/

Epiphany Masses and Blessing Tonight at St. Ann

Below is the schedule for this evening. St. Ann Mass is a High Mass at 6pm, and, the Mass in Greensboro is a 6pm Solemn High Mass (not Low)

  • Wednesday January 6 (Epiphany):
    • St. Ann, 6pm (High Mass) & afterwards the 45 minute blessing of Epiphany holy water, chalk and salt. Attendees are invited to bring your filled water bottles to be blessed. Please arrive a few minutes before Mass to place your bottles on the blessing table (likely in the Church). We hope to have some snacks
    • Our Lady of Grace (Greensboro) 6pm (Solemn High Mass) (no blessing afterwards – that was done Sunday)

As noted in prior years, the blessing of Epiphany water is available only in the traditional rite (in the Latin Church) and is a more powerful form of Holy Water as it contains a prayer of exorcism, and the litany of the saints as part of the blessing. This holy water, blessed only during this time of year, so please take advantage of the blessing – especially as we do not know what 2021 holds, spiritually speaking.

Additionally, Fisheaters has a link to the customs surrounding today’s feast day: https://www.fisheaters.com/customschristmas8.html

Feast of the Holy Name of Jesus

Laudetur Iesus Christus and blessed feast of the Most Holy Name of Jesus! As custom, Dr. Mike Foley provides a reflection on today’s post-communion prayers, and some history on this feast day’s origins: http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/01/the-postcommunion-of-feast-of-holy-name.html Additionally, Fisheaters.com also has some history and customs associated with this feast day: https://www.fisheaters.com/customschristmas7a.html

Epiphany related Masses/Blessings (January 3 – 6) 

This week begins Epiphany season and as such we list the related Epiphany celebrations:

  • Sunday January 3 (Epiphany blessing only)
    • Our Lady of Grace (Greensboro): After the 1pm Latin Mass, from 2:30pm – 4:30pm – there will be a blessing of Holy Water, chalk, and salt. Attendees are invited to bring their own filled water bottles to be blessed. (bottles need to be opened for the blessing)
  • Tuesday January 5 (Vigil of Epiphany)
    • St. Thomas Aquinas 6pm (Blessing only – No Mass). A blessing of Holy Water, chalk and salt will be performed*. Attendees are invited to bring their own filled water bottles to be blessed. (bottles need to be opened for the blessing). Please arrive a few minutes early.
  • Wednesday January 6 (Epiphany):
    • St. Ann, 6pm (High Mass) & afterwards the blessing of Epiphany holy water, chalk and salt*. Attendees are invited to bring your filled water bottles to be blessed. Please arrive a few minutes early to place your bottles on the blessing table (likely in the Church).
    • Our Lady of Grace (Greensboro) 6pm (Solemn High Mass)

As noted in prior years, the blessing of Epiphany water is available only in the traditional rite (in the Latin Church) and is a more powerful form of Holy Water as it contains a prayer of exorcism, and the litany of the saints as part of the blessing. This holy water, blessed only during this time of year, so please take advantage of the blessing – especially as we do not know what 2021 holds, spiritually speaking.

St. Philomena table

To thank and honor St. Philomena for her intercession for Thomas thus far, the CLMC will be establishing a St. Philomena section to our table in the St. Ann narthex. It’s a work in progress, but we hope to have some information out today, and then more in the weeks ahead. She was sadly was removed from the calendar in recent decades but still retains a popular devotion. St. John Vianney had a strong devotion to her as did Padre Pio and St. Francis Cabrini. We can now add the CLMC to that list now. Please stop by to see the information we have (and will have).

Feast of St. Thomas Beckett – December 29 (850th anniversary of martyrdom)

Each year we journey through the sanctoral cycle and occasionally pass a certain saint’s feast day with only a passing thought or reflection on how they achieved their sanctity or its meaning to us today (much to our detriment!).  Perhaps this could be said about St. Thomas Becket, the English archbishop of Canterbury – at least until this year. Beckett, whose feast day occurs during the joyful (and busy?) octave of Christmas certainly deserves closer attention, as the Church just commemorated the 850th anniversary of his martyrdom which occurred on December 29, 1170. However, the Church wasn’t the only one commemorating Beckett’s martyrdom.

Earlier last week, President Trump issued a proclamation declaring December 29, 2020 the 850th anniversary of St. Thomas Beckett’s death; inviting all schools, churches and meeting places to honor and commemorate this saint. While presidents offer proclamations on various topics, it is quite rare for a president to commemorate a Catholic saint, especially one who died for the Catholic Church’s liberty. That should give us pause and invite us to take a closer look at this saint as his martyrdom anniversary may hold a message for us Catholics in the United States as we enter into 2021.

Thomas Becket’s death serves as a powerful and timeless reminder to every American that our freedom from religious persecution is not a mere luxury or accident of history, but rather an essential element of our liberty. It is our priceless treasure and inheritance. And it was bought with the blood of martyrs. – President Donald Trump, December 28, 2020

https://www.whitehouse.gov/presidential-actions/proclamation-850th-anniversary-martyrdom-saint-thomas-becket/

19th century Benedictine writer, Dom Prosper Gueranger notes about Beckett:

This glorious Martyr did not shed his blood for the faith; he was not dragged before the tribunals of Pagans or Heretics, there to confess the Truths revealed by Christ and taught by the Church. He was slain by Christian hands; it was a Catholic King that condemned him to death; it was by the majority of his own Brethren, and they his countrymen, that he was abandoned and blamed. How, then, could he be a Martyr? How did he gain a Palm like Stephen’s? He was the Martyr for the Liberty of the Church. (Emphasis added.)

Gueranger continues:

To Kings and Rulers and, in general, to all Diplomatists and Politicians, there are few expressions so unwelcome as this of the Liberty of the Church; with them, it means a sort of conspiracy. The world talks of it as being an unfortunate scandal, originating in priestly ambition. Timid temporizing Catholics regret that it can elicit anyone’s zeal, and will endeavor to persuade us that we have no need to fear anything, so long as our Faith is not attacked. Notwithstanding all this, the Church has put upon her altars and associated with St. Stephen, St. John, and the Holy Innocents, this our Archbishop, who was slain in his Cathedral of Canterbury, in the 12th century, because he resisted a King’s infringements on the extrinsic Rights of the Church. She sanctions the noble maxim of St. Anselm, one of St. Thomas’ predecessors in the See of Canterbury: Nothing does God love so much in this world, as the Liberty of his Church; and the Apostolic See declares by the mouth of Pius the 8th, in the 19th century, the very same doctrine she would have taught by St. Gregory the 7th, in the 11th century: The Church, the spotless Spouse of Jesus Christ the immaculate Lamb is, by God’s appointment, Free, and subject to no earthly power (Litterae Apostolicae ad Episcopos Provinciae Rhenance, 1830).(Emphasis added.)

https://sensusfidelium.us/the-liturgical-year-dom-prosper-gueranger/december/december-29-st-thomas-archbishop-of-canterbury-and-martyr/ (the entire entry is worth reading)

Gueranger prophetically notes how some Catholics try to downplay the attacks on the Church’s liberty as long as the Faith itself is not attacked. Do we not hear the same calls today among some Catholics (even devout ones) who tell us to stand down during the continued government imposed COVID-19 “lockdowns” upon the Church’s liberty?  Gueranger continues:

A Bishop may not flee, as the hireling, nor hold his peace, like those of dumb dogs, of which the Prophet Isaias speaks, and which are not able to bark. (Isaiah 56:10) He is the Watchman of Israel: he is a traitor if he first lets the enemy enter the citadel and then, but only then, gives the alarm and risks his person and his life. The obligation of laying down his life for his flock begins to be in force at the enemy’s first attack upon the very outposts of the City, which is only safe when they are strongly guarded.

In a year where we have seen the Church’s liberty both in our area, and throughout the world, attacked, vandalized, and violated by political and medical tyrants (with more likely to come in 2021) and perpetuated by timid temporizing Catholics, perhaps St. Thomas Beckett is a saint we need to develop a greater devotion towards. Let us pray for the Church’s priests and bishops that they will have the same courage as this great English archbishop and stand for the Church’s full liberty. St. Thomas Beckett, pray for us!

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • How Different Are the Pre-1955, 1962, and 1969 Calendars from Christmas into Epiphanytide? – Dr. Peter Kwasniewski writes on how Traditional Latin Mass calendar – especially during Christmas and Epiphany is superior to the Novus Ordo – especially on emphasizing Christmas throughout the entire Christmas season. The chart in the article speaks for itself:
    https://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2021/01/how-different-are-pre-1955-1962-and.html

Christmastide Update

Laudetur Iesus Christus and Merry Christmas! As we proceed through the season of Christmastide, we wanted to share the updated Mass schedule this week thus far:

Mass cancellations

Wednesday December 30: St. Ann will not be offering the 6pm Latin Mass tomorrow, Wednesday December 30 as Fr. Reid is away (on a much deserved rest). Please offer prayers for him this week – especially after his kind blessing of wine on Sunday.

Thursday December 31: St. Thomas Aquinas will not be offering the 7pm Latin Mass on Thursday December 31.

Christmastide schedule

  • Friday January 1 (Feast of the Circumcision):
    • Our Lady of Grace, Greensboro, 12 midnight (High)
    • St. Ann, 9am (Low) – Per Fr. Reid this will be Fr. Brad Jones’ first public Latin Mass.
    • St. Mark, 12:30pm (High) (Note: Due to an annual “quirk”, the Latin Mass at St. Mark is offered pro-populorum (facing the people) during Christmastide due to the Crèche blocking the front of the altar)
    • St. Thomas Aquinas, 7pm (High)
  • Tuesday January 5 (Vigil of Epiphany)
    • St. Thomas Aquinas 6pm (Blessing only – No Mass). A blessing of Holy Water, chalk and salt will be performed*. You are invited to bring your filled water bottles to be blessed. Arrive a few minutes early.
  • Wednesday January 6 (Epiphany):
    • St. Ann, 6pm (High Mass) & afterwards the blessing of Epiphany holy water, chalk and salt*. You are invited to bring your filled water bottles to be blessed.

The Epiphany blessing of water, chalk and salt takes approximately 45 minutes – please arrive early to ensure your bottles of water, salt, and chalk are properly placed at the blessing table.

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • New York Bishop Revives Ember Days: This is exciting news – the Ember Days, as many recall is the quarterly time of year (around the change of seasons) where the Church traditionally asked the faithful to pray and fast for 3 days each season to thank God for his creation and for sanctity in the next season. Sadly these devotional days were made optional (and then essentially fell into disuse) after Vatican II (it still exists now voluntarily in the 1962 Latin Mass liturgical calendar). However, bishops do have the ability to reinstate them across the entire diocese and we are pleased to note the Bishop of Syracuse New York has reinstated the Ember Days. It does not appear to be binding, but he did attach a plenary indulgence to it. Our question is: Will Bishop Jugis be willing to revive it here?

https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/syracuse-bishop-revives-ember-days-calls-for-prayer-and-fasting-for-vocations-12751

As we re-posted the other week, the last two articles examines how the Traditional Latin Mass calendar keeps the celebration of Christmas going all the way to February 2nd. Sadly, many of these Christmas celebrations were made optional, suppressed, or deemphasized after Vatican II. The 2nd article provides a comparison of the two calendars to give you a better idea of the changes and how the Traditional Latin Mass maintains these beautiful traditions.

If you’re saddened about how the secular world has taken over Christmas, and want to see this beautiful season restored, you can do no better than to attend the Traditional Latin Mass regularly (especially on Sundays) and keep these beautiful feasts and traditions alive. If you’re not attending the Latin Mass regularly, why not make it your New Year’s resolution? The above schedule gives you many opportunities to do so!

Blessing of Wine Sunday 12:15pm

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Blessed feast of St. Stephen, and a Merry Christmas on this the 2nd day of the Octave of Christmas.  

Blessing of Wine – Tomorrow Sunday December 27 at 12:15pm (sharp), St. Ann

Sunday December 27th is the feast of St. John the Beloved and there is an ancient tradition to bless wine this day as St. John once escaped death from wine that was poisoned.  This Sunday at St. Ann, Fr. Reid has kindly agreed to bless wine at 12:15pm in the narthex at St. Ann. Please bring your wine shortly before 12:15pm and place it on or near the blessing table in the narthex. Father will bless the wine promptly at 12:15pm. Fisheaters provides some excellent background and customs for this feast day: https://www.fisheaters.com/customschristmas4.html

Additionally, as tomorrow is also the Sunday within the Octave of Christmas, Dr. Mike Foley has a reflection on this Sunday’s Mass:
http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2020/12/divine-adoption-sunday.html

January 1 and Epiphany Mass schedule: At the end of this e-mail we include the Masses for January 1, and Epiphany.

Traditional Christmas Proclamation

If you attended St. Ann Midnight Mass yesterday, you may have heard the beautiful chanting of the traditional Christmas proclamation in Latin by the St. Ann schola. This ancient proclamation was in use for centuries until the late 1960s when it was eliminated. In the mid-1990s, Pope St. John Paul II brought back the proclamation, but modernized the text a bit. The traditional proclamation is based on Septuagint (Greek) Old Testament chronology which lists the years from creation of the world to the Nativity of Christ as 5,199 years. The modern proclamation however is instead based on sort of a modernist evolutionary version which presumes long ages of the earth (unknown ages).  There are some transcribing errors with the Septuagint version, but it more closely aligns with the opinion of the ancient Church fathers who believed the age between creation and the Nativity was around 4,000 years (hence the 4 weeks of Advent to represent the 4,000 years between creation and Christ). To learn more about this and how the Venerable Bede corrected this please read this great report from the Kolbe Center for Creation (whom the CLMC co-sponsored a year ago at St. Mark parish):

https://www.kolbecenter.org/kolbe-report-9-7-19/

To see the differences between the traditional and modern proclamations visit: https://catholic-resources.org/ChurchDocs/ChristmasProclamation.htm

Prayers for the Underground Church in China

This Christmas season, please consider praying for the underground Catholic Church in China. The Cardinal Kung Foundation is the main apostolate in the U.S. helping to support the underground priests and faithful. Sadly, with the new Vatican-China accord, many of the Communist-installed bishops (who are part of the above-ground Communist “ Patriotic Catholic” Church) are taking over Rome-loyal dioceses – sadly with Vatican approval. A few faithful bishops have chosen to resign or step away rather than violate their consciences. The Church in China is complex (and often hard to understand) situation but you can read more in their Christmas letter below. The Foundation was named after Cardinal Ignatius Kung who was imprisoned for nearly 30 years for his fidelity to Rome/Pope, before being exiled to the U.S. in 1988.  He offered the Traditional Mass periodically before his death in 2,000. To learn more or to support the Cardinal Kung Foundation with a year end gift, please visit: http://www.cardinalkungfoundation.org/

Cardinal Kung Foundation Christmas Newsletter: http://www.cardinalkungfoundation.org/nl/pdf/currentnl.pdf

Christmas Reflection by the Carmelite Hermits

Lastly, in this Octave of Christmas, we are pleased to share with you the Christmas reflection of our friends, the traditional Carmelite Hermits in Fairfield, PA (whom many of you visited during their visit to Charlotte in 2017).  The reflection is attached as a PDF. If you are looking for other excellent Catholic apostolates to support, this would be a great one as they subsist entirely on donations and have no business to generate funds. Their business is strictly to pray and sacrifice for God (in the traditional Carmelite Rite). To learn more or make a year end gift visit: https://www.eremitaednmc.org/

Christmastide Special Masses

  • Friday January 1 (Feast of the Circumcision):
    • Our Lady of Grace, Greensboro, 12 midnight (High)
    • St. Ann, 9am (Low)
    • St. Mark, 12:30pm (High) (Note: Due to an annual “quirk”, the Latin Mass at St. Mark is offered pro-populorum (facing the people) during Christmastide due to the Crèche blocking the front of the altar)
    • St. Thomas Aquinas, 7pm (High)
  • Tuesday January 5 (Vigil of Epiphany)
    • St. Thomas Aquinas 6pm (Blessing only – No Mass). A blessing of Holy Water, chalk and salt will be performed*. You are invited to bring your filled water bottles to be blessed. Arrive a few minutes early.
  • Wednesday January 6 (Epiphany):
    • St. Ann, 6pm (High Mass) & afterwards the blessing of Epiphany holy water, chalk and salt*. You are invited to bring your filled water bottles to be blessed.

The Epiphany blessing of water, chalk and salt takes approximately 45 minutes – please arrive early to ensure your bottles of water, salt, and chalk are properly placed at the blessing table.

For more Latin Mass & traditional Catholic news, please see our Christmas Eve update: https://charlottelatinmass.org/2020/12/24/christmas-schedule-blessing-of-wine-sunday/

Christmas Schedule & Blessing of Wine Sunday

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Blessed Vigil of the Nativity – today December 24 is also known as the ancient feast of Saints Adam and Eve – our first parents, who committed the original sin and as tradition holds, after their expulsion for paradise, did penance for the rest of their 900+ years of life. Some of the eastern Churches commemorate this feast day of the old Adam and old Eve, the day before the birth of the New Adam, through the New Eve (the blessed Mother). As noted a few weeks ago, tradition holds that Adam’s remains (or at least his skull) was re-buried in Jerusalem after Noe’s flood, underneath what today is called Calvary, the site of the crucifixion.

Please see our schedule below and see the important note about the Blessing of Wine for the Feast of St. John this Sunday at St. Ann.

Christmas Latin Mass Schedule

The great feast of Christmas is a solemn 1st class feast so normal Friday penances are dispensed (i.e. you can have meat). Christmas has 3 distinct Masses for the day, and priests are also allowed to offer 3 Masses to commemorate the birth of Our Savior. At the close of this e-mail we provide some details on the 3 Masses.

Christmas Masses

  • St. Ann, 12 midnight (Solemn High) & 11:00am (Low) Christmas Day (signup Mass – see parish website. There will also be outdoor seating available for those unable to sit inside/prefer not to sign up. All will have opportunity to receive Holy Communion)
  • St. Thomas Aquinas, 12 midnight (High)
  • St. John the Baptist, Tryon, 12 Midnight (High)
  • St. Elizabeth of the Hill Country, Boone, NC, 12 Midnight
  • Our Lady of Grace, Greensboro, 11:00am High & 1:00pm Low (signup Mass – see parish website)

**For special Latin Masses during Christmastide including Epiphany please visit our webpage: https://charlottelatinmass.org/mass-times/ **

No Respect Life Latin Mass Saturday: Please note there will not be a 4th Saturday Respect Life Latin Mass at St. Ann Saturday morning.

Blessing of Wine this Sunday December 27 BEFORE 12:30pm Mass (at 12:15pm)

This Sunday December 27th is the feast of St. John the Beloved and there is an ancient tradition to bless wine this day as St. John once escaped death from wine that was poisoned.  This Sunday at St. Ann, Fr. Reid has kindly agreed to bless wine at 12:15pm in the narthex at St. Ann. Please bring your wine shortly before 12:15pm and place it on or near the blessing table in the narthex. Father will bless the wine promptly at 12:15pm. Fisheaters provides some excellent background and customs for this feast day: https://www.fisheaters.com/customschristmas4.html

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • Sermon on the Christmas Star: Around this time of year we hear often about the “Christmas Star” – but what is it exactly? This traditional sermon provides some background on the supernatural phenomenon seen by the Magi. The sermon is posted by Sensus Fidelium: https://youtu.be/IgNiEr_9yNQ
  • The 3 Universal “Peaces”: Dom Prosper Gueranger noted in the Liturgical Year (on the feast of St. Ambrose, December 7), that St. Bonaventure taught that tradition holds there are 3 periods of time where the world will be at peace (the 3 silences). The first was after the Noe’s flood subsided when all of humanity was wiped out (except Noe’s family); the 2nd was during the birth of Christ (Pax Romana); and the 3rd shall be in the last days after the defeat of the anti-Christ. To read the brief except scroll down towards the bottom of this reflection: https://sensusfidelium.us/the-liturgical-year-dom-prosper-gueranger/december/december-7-st-ambrose-bishop-and-doctor-of-the-church/
  • The Liturgical Year Reflections for Christmas Eve & Christmas: Dom Gueranger has some excellent reflections for Christmas Eve, the hours leading up to Midnight Mass, and for Christmas day. We link to them here:
  • When was Christ Born? This question occasionally arises this time of year. Some argue we don’t know the date or that its inaccurate. In this wonderful book, the Frenchman General Hugues de Nanteuil examines this question in his book, The Dates of the Birth and Death of Jesus Christ (recommended by a traditional priest). He looks at all the historical evidence, the changing of the Julian calendar to Gregorian, Herod’s death, the debates about Josephus’ accuracy, and indeed demonstrates that Christ was born on December 25, 1 B.C. in today’s calendar. A priest also echoed this with a simple question: Does not a mother always remember when her child was born – especially if the child was the Messiah?   To learn more visit: https://www.lulu.com/shop/general-hugues-de-nanteuil/the-dates-of-the-birth-and-death-of-jesus-christ/paperback/product-2661708.html?page=1&pageSize=4

The 3 Masses of Christmas

As we approach Christmas, there are 3 Latin Masses for Christmas: Midnight, Dawn, and Day. Each represent the three-fold Nativity of Christ and the Masses are all connected to each other, becoming a sort of a triduum (like Easter) or a trilogy.  We provide some great information from Fisheaters.com and a 2016 talk given by Fr. Innocent Smith, OP of New York who based it off of St. Thomas Aquinas’ writings.  NOTE: The below summary is just a layman’s effort and not authoritative or exhaustive. The 3 Masses are:

Midnight Mass: “The Angels’” Mass, symbolizing Christ’s eternal birth, which takes place before creation, hidden from Men. Thus Mass is offered in the hidden darkness at Midnight.  According to tradition, Christ was born at Midnight.

Mass at Dawn: “The Shepherds’” Mass, symbolizing the spiritual birth of Christ into our hearts, where He, the Sun, is like “the morning star that rise in your hearts” (2 Peter 1:19). Thus typically Mass is offered at dawn or early morning when daylight is breaking. The text of Mass focuses on the coming light of Christ that will shine on mankind.

Mass at Day: “The Kings’” Mass, symbolizing the temporal and bodily nativity of Christ, which He processes to us in a visible and bodily form, having put on the flesh. Thus Mass is offered in full daylight as He is now fully visible to men.  The text of Mass (at least the Introit) focuses on Christ’s humanity.  (N.B. Others like liturgist Dom Gueranger have a different order of the 3 Masses than St. Thomas)

The FSSP Latin Mass parish in Atlanta, also shared this 1920 article of the 3 Masses:
https://www.dominicanajournal.org/wp-content/files/old-journal-archive/vol5/no3/dominicanav5n3threemasseschristmasday.pdf

To learn more about the traditional customs surrounding Christmas please visit: https://www.fisheaters.com/customschristmas1.html and https://www.fisheaters.com/customschristmas2.html

4th Sunday of Advent

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Today Sunday December 20th is the 4th Sunday of Advent, and as custom we provide a reflection on the Collect by Dr. Mike Foley:
http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2020/12/the-indulgent-collect-of-fourth-sunday.html

Annual Blessing of Religious Objects/Gifts – Today Sunday December 20

Sunday December 20, St. Ann parish, after 12:30pm Latin Mass: Just a reminder,  as custom, the Sunday before Christmas, Father will kindly bless any religious objects/gifts immediately after 12:30pm Mass. This includes Rosaries, statues, images, scapulars, icons, chaplets, candles, crucifixes, medals, etc. This will be done in the traditional Latin blessing.

We will have a blessing table in the narthex to place your religious items prior to Mass beginning. We again want to emphasize – please have your items on the table before Mass begins. Please avoid placing any items on the table after Father begins his blessing – we can’t guarantee they are blessed.

Christmas Latin Mass Schedule

The great feast of the Nativity of Our Blessed Lord is this Friday. It’s a solemn 1st class feast so normal Friday penances are dispensed and you can have meat (see our note below about Christmas Eve fasting).

Christmas has 3 distinct Masses for the day, and priests are also allowed to offer 3 Masses to commemorate the birth of Our Savior. The first Mass is midnight, which marks Christ coming into the dark world at Bethlehem on December 25, 1 B.C.; Mass at dawn symbolizes the spiritual birth of Christ in our souls and Mass during the day represents eternal love of Christ for coming to us in the Incarnation.   To learn more about the traditional customs surrounding Christmas please visit: https://www.fisheaters.com/customschristmas1.html and https://www.fisheaters.com/customschristmas2.html

Some parishes are having signup Christmas Masses so check each parish website. We did confirm that no one will be turned away from St. Ann and there will have extra outdoor seating at Midnight Mass.

  • St. Ann, 12 midnight (Solemn High) & 11:00am (Low) Christmas Day (signup Mass – see parish website. There will also be outdoor seating available for those unable to sit inside/prefer not to sign up. All will have opportunity to receive Holy Communion)
  • St. Thomas Aquinas, 12 midnight
  • St. John the Baptist, Tryon, 12 midnight
  • St. Elizabeth of the Hill Country, Boone, NC, 12 midnight
  • Our Lady of Grace, Greensboro, 11:00am High & 1:00pm Low (signup Mass – see parish website)

For the rest of the Christmastide Latin Mass schedule – including Friday January 1 – please see our webpage which is updated frequently: https://charlottelatinmass.org/mass-times/

Dec. 23/24 – Fasting and Abstinence Note

Traditionally, Christmas Eve (the feast of Ss. Adam & Eve) was a day of fasting and abstinence, however that has been eliminated by the current code of canon law. However, for those who want to maintain this practice as a pious devotion, we share that in 1959, St. John XXIII allowed the Christmas Eve fast/abstinence to be transferred to today December 23. Hence if you’d like to follow this old practice, you are welcome to practice it on December 23 instead of the 24th. To learn more visit: https://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2011/12/anticipation-of-christmas-fast-to.html

December 21 – Feast of St. Thomas the Apostle

Monday December 21 is the traditional feast of St. Thomas the Apostle, who often gets overlooked due to the crowded liturgical schedule of Ember Week and Christmas. Yet this saint is not the least by any means, as tradition holds that St. Thomas evangelized not only India, but Persia including baptizing the 3 Magi; and also much of the globe – including the western hemisphere.  As custom each December 21, we share with you a great sermon posted by Sensus Fidelium, on St. Thomas the Apostle: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F1bBepndSGY

Dom Prosper Gueranger also has a reflection for this saint: https://sensusfidelium.us/the-liturgical-year-dom-prosper-gueranger/december/december-21-saint-thomas-apostle/

Epiphany Blessing of Water, Salt and Chalk January 5/6: 

  • Tuesday January 5, 6pm (Blessing only): Fr. Matthew Bean at St. Thomas Aquinas has announced he will be blessing Epiphany Water, salt and chalk on Tuesday January 5 (Vigil of Epiphany) at 6pm. There will not be a Mass that evening.
  • Wednesday January 6, 6pm (Mass & blessing): Reid will offer a 6pm High Mass at St. Ann, followed by the Epiphany Water, salt, and chalk blessing. All are invited to bring their filled water jugs (i.e. fill the water up prior to attending and Father will bless them). There will also be an Epiphany Holy Water font to draw from as well (while quantities last). Please note the blessing takes about 45 minutes.

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • Cardinal Burke’s Our Lady of Guadalupe sermon: His Eminence’s powerful sermon Marxism, the Chinese Communist party, COVID-19 and the Great Reset all that threatens the United States today: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWENECMqRGU

As we first posted last Christmastide, the last two articles examines how the Traditional Latin Mass calendar keeps the celebration of Christmas going all the way to February 2nd. Sadly, many of these Christmas celebrations were made optional, suppressed, or deemphasized after Vatican II. The 2nd article provides a comparison of the two calendars to give you a better idea of the changes and how the Traditional Latin Mass maintains these beautiful traditions

If you’re saddened about how the secular world has taken over Christmas, and want to see this beautiful season restored, you can do no better than to attend the Traditional Latin Mass regularly (especially on Sundays) and keep these beautiful feasts and traditions alive. If you’re not attending the Latin Mass regularly, why not make it your New Year’s resolution? The above schedule gives you many opportunities to do so!

Advent Embertide Update

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Blessed Advent Embertide. As noted in Sunday’s e-mail, this week (Wednesday, Friday and Saturday) are the seasonal ember days – when the traditional Church sets aside 3 days each season for prayer, fasting and partial abstinence (the latter two now voluntary) to thank God for his gifts of creation and to use them in moderation. It’s a good time to also pray for sanctity for the upcoming season. Fisheaters has more commentary here: https://www.fisheaters.com/customsadvent11.html

Ember Week Masses:

  • Ember Friday: St. Ann 7am (Low) & St. Mark, 12:30pm (Low)
  • Ember Saturday: NEW: St. Michael the Archangel, Gastonia 8:30am (Low)

New weekly Saturday Latin Mass at St. Michael

As noted above, we are pleased to report that a new weekly Saturday morning Latin Mass is starting up at St. Michael the Archangel. Fr. Rossi will offer a weekly 8:30am Low Mass on Saturdays. We understand he started doing it last weekend. This is good news and great to see the Latin Mass returning to St. Michael. Please offer prayers of thanksgiving for Fr. Rossi for generously offering this new Latin Mass time. The website is: https://stmccg.org/

Annual Blessing of Religious Objects – This Sunday December 20

This Sunday December 20, St. Ann parish, after 12:30pm Latin Mass: Just a reminder,  as custom, the Sunday before Christmas, Father will kindly bless any objects immediately after 12:30pm Mass. This includes Rosaries, statues, images, scapulars, icons, chaplets, candles, crucifixes, medals, etc. This will be done in the traditional Latin blessing. We should have the table

We will have a blessing table in the narthex to place your religious items prior to Mass beginning. We again want to emphasize – please have your items on the table before Mass begins. Please do not place any items on the table after Father begins his blessing – we can’t guarantee they are blessed.

Prayers for Our Nation

Lastly, speaking of prayer, please continue to pray the Rosary for our nation and let us continue to heed Father Reid’s advice on the day after Election Day: dig in and continue to pray.

Things remain unsettled and now is the time to continue praying. These are ominous times, but as we Catholics know, the Light of the World comes at the darkest time of the year, and God ultimately reigns over this world.