Immaculate Conception Novena – November 30 – December 8

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Today Fr. Reid and St. Ann parish are starting a novena to the Immaculate Heart of Mary beginning today November 30 – December 8. The novena will conclude on the feast of the Immaculate Conception (December 8) with a consecration of St. Ann to the Immaculate Heart of Mary at the 6pm Latin Mass on December 8.

We want to encourage everyone to participate in this novena beginning today. We also ask to please include our Latin Mass community in your novena intentions.

Here is the message from Fr. Reid sent out today along with the prayers:

I invite all of you to join me in a special novena to Our Lady, beginning today, November 30, and continuing until December 8.  As we’ve done for many years, I am going to consecrate our parish to the Immaculate Heart of Mary on the Feast of the Immaculate Conception at the 6 p.m. Mass on December 8.  In preparation for this, I ask you to consider fasting from something you enjoy (as you would during Lent) and praying the following Novena Prayer to the Immaculate Heart of Mary each day from November 30 – December 8:

O Most Blessed Mother, heart of love, heart of mercy, ever listening, caring, consoling, hear our prayer. As your children, we implore your intercession with Jesus your Son. Receive with understanding and compassion the petitions we place before you today, especially that our parish may be consecrated to your Immaculate Heart.  We are comforted in knowing your heart is ever open to those who ask for your prayer. We trust to your gentle care and intercession, those whom we love and who are sick or lonely or hurting. Help all of us, Holy Mother, to bear our burdens in this life until we may share eternal life and peace with God forever. Amen.

We have attached novena as well in case one wishes to print it out.

Lastly, as a reminder this Sunday is 1st Sunday and the Salisbury Latin Mass Community will be having its 1st Sunday Latin Mass December 4 at 4pm. Fr. Noah Carter will offer the Mass (no confessions however). Immediately after Mass there will be a potluck in Brincefield Hall, please bring something to share. For questions visit: www.salisburylmc.org

First Sunday of Advent

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Sunday, the first Sunday of Advent begins the new liturgical year, and a new season – the time of penitential and joyful preparation for the coming of Christ at Christmas. As custom we share a reflection for Sunday’s Collect: http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2020/11/the-tempestuous-collect-for-first.html

Latin Masses This Week

  • Wednesday November 30, 6pm – St. Ann, feast of St. Andrew
  • Thursday December 1, 7pm – St. Thomas Aquinas, Feria (no feast day)
  • Friday December 2, 7am (St. Ann) and 12:30pm (St. Mark), St. Bibiana, Virgin and Martyr
  • Saturday December 3, 6am Rorate Mass, St. Thomas Aquinas, St. Francis Xavier, Confessor (& First Saturday of Our Lady) (NO 10am Latin Mass)

Advent Schedule of Latin Masses

Rorate Latin Masses (Latin Mass by Candlelight at Dawn on a Saturday in Advent)

  • Saturday December 3, 6am – St. Thomas Aquinas parish (no 10am Mass today) – after Mass blessing of religious objects
  • Saturday December 3, 6:30am – Prince of Peace, Taylors, SC (2 hours southwest of Charlotte)
  • Saturday December 10, 6:30am – St. Ann parish
  • Saturday December 10, 6am – Holy Cross parish in Kernersville (1.5 hours north of Charlotte)
  • Saturday December 10, 6:30am – St. Elizabeth of the Hill Country, Boone (2 hours northwest of Charlotte)
  • Saturday December 10, 6:30am – Prince of Peace, Taylors, SC (2 hours southwest of Charlotte)
  • Saturday December 10, 6:30am – St. Margaret Mary, Swannanoa (2 hours northwest of Charlotte)
  • Saturday December 17, 6am – Our Lady of Grace, Greensboro (1.5 hours north of Charlotte)
  • Saturday December 17, 6:30am – Prince of Peace, Taylors, SC (2 hours southwest of Charlotte)

Feast of the Immaculate Conception – Thursday December 8

December 13 – 15 Advent Mission with Fraternity of St. Peter (FSSP) Priests (St. Thomas Aquinas parish): https://charlottelatinmass.org/2022/11/22/advent-mission-with-fssp-priests-st-thomas-aquinas-parish-december-13-15/

Sunday December 18, 12:30pm – St. Ann parish & the CLMC’s annual blessing of religious objects after the 12:30pm Latin Mass

Advent-Christmas Schedule: Please see our webpage for the most recent announced Latin Masses during Advent and Christmas: https://charlottelatinmass.org/mass-times/

Community News

  • Second Fr. Ripperger Talk Added For Friday March 10: Due to the overwhelming interest in hearing exorcist and traditional theologian, Fr. Chad Ripperger, St. Thomas Aquinas parish is now hosting a second, identical talk, by Fr. Ripperger on Friday March 10. Please see the parish’s note:

    Due to the Saturday, March 11, 2023 event filling up so quickly, Fr. Codd asked Fr. Ripperger if he would be willing to come on Friday, March 10, 2023, to do an additional identical conference, in order to allow for more parishioners and folks from the diocese to attend.  Fr. Ripperger graciously agreed, and so we will now have him speak both on Friday and Saturday.  Note, these will be the same talk on both days.  Saturday is already full.  If you are signed up already to attend Saturday, please do not register for Friday as well, or we will delete your registration.  Please register as soon as possible in order to help us with planning.  As well, if you are able to help support us bringing Fr. Ripperger in for an additional talk, please use the registration form to do so, or use this link.  Thank you! https://www.osvhub.com/st-thomas-aquinas-rc-church/forms/frripperger-friday
  • Holy Face Devotions (new updates)
  • St. Mark – Mondays 2-2:45pm
  • St. Thomas Aquinas – Tuesdays 6am in the main church
  • St. Ann – Tuesdays 7:30am in the chapel after the Novus Ordo Mass (uses the booklet/chaplet which takes 15-20 minutes)
  • St. Michael the Archangel, Gastonia – Tuesdays, 6:30-7pm, Holy Family Room
  • Holy Spirit, Denver – Tuesdays 10-11am after the Novus Ordo Mass
  • Don’t see your parish? Why not organize one? (e-mail us at info@charlottelatinmass.org)

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • Fraternity of St. Peter Statistics November 2022: The FSSP, a society of Latin Mass priests (which as noted above include two St. Ann parishioners), released their annual figures, showing the growth in this order: https://www.fssp.org/en/presentation-2/figures/

CLMC note: Many are worried about the future of the Latin Mass, yet these nuns aren’t worried, why should we?

  • Papal Responses to the Emergence of the TLM Movement: Over the past few months, three liturgical scholars coauthored a five part series on the recent history of the Mass (post Vatican II), which included the history of Papal interventions on the Latin Mass since 1965. Sadly, this article is no friend of the Latin Mass or traditionalists as it argues that the permissions by Popes John Paul II and Benedict XVI to offer the Latin Mass were only meant to be temporary (e.g. the Latin Mass will need to go away). Despite this position, it is nevertheless an instructive read for all traditionalists, as it gives an idea of what the “opposition” is thinking (and heading), theologically and liturgically. The original article (Part IV) is below but after that link we share two helpful rebuttals on the fifth part by traditionalists Drs. Joseph Shaw and Peter Kwasniewski: https://churchlifejournal.nd.edu/articles/papal-responses-to-the-emergence-of-the-tlm-movement/

CLMC note: We are grateful for the charity of Abp. Vigano to defend the laity and priests when their bishop suppressed the Latin Mass – especially the reminder for a bishop to consider the four Last Things and his eternal destiny before making such decisions.

Advent Reflections by Dom Prosper Gueranger, OSB

Lastly, as we begin Advent, we close with a few reflections by the great Benedictine liturgist, Dom Prosper Gueranger in his book, The Liturgical Year, for this coming week to better place ourselves in the context of Advent and preparing for Christ’s coming at Christmas. The first entry addresses the question of whether Advent was penitential in origin or not (click on the link below for the full history). Additionally, we especially draw your attention to the fourth entry, the December 3rd reflection which eerily parallels our times:

  • History of Advent: We must look upon Advent in two different lights: first, as a time of preparation, properly so called, for the birth of our Saviour, by works of penance: and secondly, as a series of ecclesiastical Offices drawn up for the same purpose…The oldest document in which we find the length and exercises of Advent mentioned with anything like clearness, is a passage in the second book of the History of the Franks by St. Gregory of Tours, where he says that St. Perpetuus, one of his predecessors, who held that see about the year 480, had decreed a fast three times a week, from the feast of St. Martin until Christmas.  
  • December 1: Four thousand years of expectation preceded that coming, and they are expressed by the four weeks of Advent, which we must spend before we come to the glorious festivity of our Lord’s Nativity. Let us reflect upon the holy impatience of the saints of the old Testament, and how they handed down, from age to age, the grand hope, which was to be but hope to them, since they were not to see it realized.
  • December 2 (Feast of St. Bibiana): We will today consider the state of nature at this season of the year. The earth is stripped of her wonted verdure, the flowers are gone, the fruits are fallen, the leaves are torn from the trees and scattered by the wind, and every living thing stiffens with the cold. It seems as though the hand of death had touched creation. We see the sun rise after the long night of his absence; and scarcely have we felt his warmth at noon, than he sets again, and leaves us in the chilly darkness. Each day he shortens his visit. Is the world to become sunless, and are men to live out the rest of life in gloom? The old pagans, who witnessed this struggle between light and darkness, and feared the sun was going to leave them, dedicated the twenty-fifth day of December, the winter solstice, to the worship of the sun. After this day their hopes revived on seeing the glorious luminary again mounting up in the sky, and gradually regaining his triumphant position.

    We Christians can have no such feelings as these; our light is the true faith, which tells us that there is a Sun to be sought for which never sets, and is never eclipsed. Having Him, we care little for the absence of any other brightness; nay, all other light, without Him, can only lead us astray.
  • December 3 (Feast of St. Francis Xavier): Let us consider the wretched condition of the human race, at the time of Christ’s coming into the world. The diminution of truths[3] is emphatically expressed by the little light which the earth enjoys at this season of the year. The ancient traditions are gradually becoming extinct; the Creator is not acknowledged, even in the very work of His hands; everything has been made God, except the God who made all things. This frightful pantheism produces the vilest immorality, both in society at large, and in individuals. There are no rights acknowledged, save that of might. Lust, avarice, and theft, are honoured by men in the gods of their altars. There is no such thing as family, for divorce and infanticide are legalized; mankind is degraded by a general system of slavery; nations are being exterminated by endless wars. The human race is in the last extreme of misery; and unless the hand that created it reform it, it must needs sink a prey to crime and bloodshed.

    There are indeed some few just men still left upon the earth, and they struggle against the torrent of universal degradation; but they cannot save the world; the world despises them, and God will not accept their merits as a palliation of the hideous leprosy which covers the earth. All flesh has corrupted its way, and is more guilty than even in the days of the deluge: and yet, a second destruction of the universe would but manifest anew the justice of God; it is time that a deluge of His divine mercy should flood the universe, and that He who made man, should come down and heal him. Come then, O eternal Son of God! give life again to this dead body; heal all its wounds; purify it; let grace superabound, where sin before abounded; and having converted the world to Thy holy law, Thou wilt have proved to all ages that Thou, who camest, wast in very truth the Word of the Father; for as none but a God could create the world, so none but the same omnipotent God could save it from satan and sin, and restore it to justice and holiness.

December is the darkest time of the year and yet the time of year when the Light of the World comes at Christmas. In December 2022, the Church finds herself in one of the darkest times of her history, restrictions on the Latin Mass loom, yet at the same time the Latin Mass remains because it is the Mass of Ages, past, present and future. What Mass are you attending on Sunday?

Thanksgiving Schedule Update

Laudetur Iesus Christus! We just wanted to send a quick reminder of the revised schedule over the next few days due to the Thanksgiving holiday.

Latin Masses This Week (Note Cancellations)

  • Thursday November 24NO LATIN MASS at St. Thomas Aquinas, Canceled due to Thanksgiving holiday
  • Friday November 25, 12:30pm St. Mark (NO 7AM LATIN MASS at St. Ann), feast of St. Catherine of Alexandria
  • Saturday November 26, – NO 4th SATURDAY 8AM LATIN Mass at St. Ann, canceled due to Thanksgiving holiday weekend

Advent-Christmas Schedule:

If you are planning ahead, please see our webpage for the most recent announced Latin Masses during Advent and Christmas: https://charlottelatinmass.org/mass-times/

Thanksgiving: Catholic Origins

Since tomorrow is the secular holiday of Thanksgiving, we wanted to reshare our annual post regarding the Catholic origins of Thanksgiving.

Around the feast of Martinmas (November 11), we shared a few articles examining the European-Catholic origins of the American Thanksgiving, which was modeled after the feast of St. Martin (Martinmas) and was sort of an end of the harvest commemoration. That is likely where the pilgrims developed the idea of an American thanksgiving. With the American Thanksgiving upon us tomorrow, we wanted to provide some Catholic background on the topic, both liturgically and historically. We reshare the Martinmas articles and some additional ones:

While, as we note above, the American Thanksgiving holiday was organized by protestants, the first true Thanksgiving on this land was actually Catholic in origin, and held 50 years earlier in newly discovered San Augustine, Florida in 1565 by Spanish explorers. Their priest offered Mass (Latin Mass of course) – the first on American soil, and then held a feast. Here are a few articles that explain the origins:

The Mythical Thanksgiving Indult by Pope Pius XII: As we approach the Thanksgiving Day holiday, we share with you a magnificent piece penned by Sharon Kabel, who examined the mysterious legend of the Friday-After-Thanksgiving Indult, supposedly granted by Pope Pius XII to allow American Catholics to eat meat on the day after Thanksgiving. It should be stated this is a moot point now since the 1983 Code of Canon Law and the US Bishops Conference has sadly allowed a “substitution” for Friday abstinence.  Anyhow, for traditionalists, this is an occasionally debated topic each Thanksgiving and Sharon does good research to find out the truth: http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2020/11/on-mythical-pius-xii-thanksgiving.html

Happy Thanksgiving and God Bless

Advent Mission with FSSP Priests – St. Thomas Aquinas Parish (December 13 – 15)

Laudetur Iesus Christus!

We are pleased to share that St. Thomas Aquinas parish has graciously invited two Fraternity of St. Peter (FSSP) priests to give a special Advent parish mission from Tuesday December 13 – Thursday December 15. The schedule will feature a mission talk as well as confessions. Additionally as a bonus, each night before the mission, the priests will give a customized talk on separate nights for men, youth, and women. We can’t express enough the blessing of having these priests – who offer the Latin Mass exclusively – to give a mission and a few talks. We encourage everyone to take advantage of this wonderful event.

The mission priests are Fr. Joseph Portzer, FSSP, and Fr. Martin Adams, FSSP.

The schedule is as follows:

Tuesday December 13

6pm – Men’s Talk

7pm – Mission (open to all)

Wednesday December 14

6pm – Youth Talk (suited for high school age youth – parents discretion)

7pm – Mission (open to all)

Thursday December 15

6pm – Women’s Talk

7pm – Latin Mass (open to all)

8pm – Mission (open to all)

For those new to the Latin Mass, the Fraternity of St. Peter is a congregation of priests who offer the Latin Mass exclusively and staff chapels and parishes throughout North America and the world. Two members of our community and St. Ann parish are enrolled in the FSSP seminary in Nebraska. In prior years, the CLMC has hosted FSSP priests to give talks and most recently asked Bishop Jugis to consider inviting the FSSP into the diocese full time as part of our Synod request.  We are grateful St. Thomas Aquinas parish for offering this timely mission and also a wonderful opportunity to better acquaint us with the charism of the FSSP priests, many who maintain close ties and friendships with our diocesan priests.

Twenty Fourth Sunday After Pentecost

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Sunday is the 24th and last Sunday after Pentecost and according to the St. Andrew Daily Missal, the traditional breviary lessons are from the prophet Micheas who foretells of the destruction of Jerusalem which is symbolic of the world at the end of time (Micheas 1:5-7), which is what is commemorated today. Yet Micheas also gives hope and also foretells of the coming liturgical season of Advent and Christmas with the birth of Christ in Bethlehem (Micheas 5:2). For today’s Latin Mass, we share a reflection on Sunday’s Collect for the Mass which ties all these topics together: https://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2020/11/the-stirring-collect-for-last-sunday.html#.Y3m2eH3MKHs

Latin Masses This Week (Note Cancellations)

  • Wednesday November 23, 6pm – St. Ann, feast of Pope St. Clement I
  • Thursday November 24NO LATIN MASS at St. Thomas Aquinas, Canceled due to Thanksgiving holiday
  • Friday November 25, 12:30pm St. Mark (NO 7AM LATIN MASS at St. Ann), feast of St. Catherine of Alexandria
  • Saturday November 26, – NO 4th SATURDAY 8AM LATIN Mass at St. Ann, canceled due to Thanksgiving holiday weekend

Advent-Christmas Schedule: Please see our webpage for the most recent announced Latin Masses during Advent and Christmas: https://charlottelatinmass.org/mass-times/

CCHD – Morally Problematic 2nd Collection

Today in some parishes, there will be a 2nd collection for the Catholic Campaign for Human Development (CCHD), which is administered by the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops and has been found to be given money occasionally to morally problematic organizations that promote abortion or  revolutionary causes. Thankfully St. Ann’s, St. Thomas Aquinas, and St. Mark parishes, and other parishes are not participating in this collection, but other parishes might. Know before you give. To learn more about the problems you can view at the Carolina Pro-Life Action Network’s website (a Catholic pro-life group here): https://www.prolifecharlotte.org/cchd-2021/

Community News

  • St. Ann Parishioners Receive Minor Orders at FSSP Seminary: Two St. Ann parishioners who are attending the Fraternity of St. Peter’s Our Lady of Guadalupe Seminary in Nebraska received minor orders yesterday. Mr. David Carter was conferred the minor orders of Exorcist and Acolyte, while Mr. Brendan d’Amato received the minor orders of Porter and Lector. The Traditional Rite has both minor (Tonsure, Porter, Lector, Exorcist, Acolyte, and Subdeacon) and major orders (deacon and priest) as part of a seminarian’s path to the priesthood. The minor orders were abolished in 1972 and are only conferred to those seminarians studying at traditional seminaries (generally not diocesan). Please pray for both men as they continue their studies and discernment. To see a brief write up and prayer cards visit the FSSP seminary: http://www.fsspolgs.org/minor-orders-november-19-2022/

  • Second Fr. Ripperger Talk Added For Friday March 10: Due to the overwhelming interest in hearing exorcist and traditional theologian, Fr. Chad Ripperger, St. Thomas Aquinas parish is now hosting a second, identical talk, by Fr. Ripperger on Friday March 10. Please see the parish’s note:

    Due to the Saturday, March 11, 2023 event filling up so quickly, Fr. Codd asked Fr. Ripperger if he would be willing to come on Friday, March 10, 2023, to do an additional identical conference, in order to allow for more parishioners and folks from the diocese to attend.  Fr. Ripperger graciously agreed, and so we will now have him speak both on Friday and Saturday.  Note, these will be the same talk on both days.  Saturday is already full.  If you are signed up already to attend Saturday, please do not register for Friday as well, or we will delete your registration.  Please register as soon as possible in order to help us with planning.  As well, if you are able to help support us bringing Fr. Ripperger in for an additional talk, please use the registration form to do so, or use this link.  Thank you! https://www.osvhub.com/st-thomas-aquinas-rc-church/forms/frripperger-friday
  • Holy Face Devotions (new updates)
  • St. Mark – Mondays 2-2:45pm
  • St. Thomas Aquinas – Tuesdays 6am in the main church
  • St. Ann – Tuesdays 7:30am in the chapel after the Novus Ordo Mass (uses the booklet/chaplet which takes 15-20 minutes)
  • **St. Michael the Archangel, Gastonia ** – Tuesdays, 6:30-7pm, Holy Family Room (NEW)
  • **Holy Spirit, Denver ** – Tuesdays 10-11am after the Novus Ordo Mass
  • Don’t see your parish? Why not organize one?

Catholic Thanksgiving History

To learn more about the Catholic traditions that influenced the U.S. Thanksgiving, please visit our 2021 post: https://charlottelatinmass.org/2021/11/21/last-sunday-after-pentecost-advent-christmas-schedule/

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • Floriani Men’s Schola: As Tuesday is the feast of St. Cecilia, patroness of musicians, a reader has shared that there is a wonderful men’s schola operating in the Archdiocese of Phoenix that is helping to revive Gregorian Chant. The group, Floriani, chants at various Latin Masses in the Phoenix area, but also has a chant-school podcast where they offer classes to help people learn Gregorian chant. To learn more visit: https://www.floriani.org
  • Archbishop Viganò Revisits Ratzinger: Recently, Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò has written an essay examining the role Joseph Ratzinger (Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI) had in influencing the documents of Vatican II. The piece raises some uncomfortable issues about His Holiness’ early writings as a younger priest, which the Archbishop calls “Hegelian” and follows the philosophical framework of “thesis-antithesis-synthesis”. In simplistic layman’s terms, this modernist framework appears to merge two opposing, irreconcilable, views into one blended solution. Viganò notes, that at Vatican II these opposing views were focused on one area in particular:  

“[B]etween the Catholic thesis of the Mystical Body [of Christ] and the progressivist antithesis of the ‘people of God’…

Vatican II […]supposedly ended by accepting the exact synthesis that Ratzinger had theorized in his 1954 dissertation…A bold thesis, on closer inspection, that risks confusing the substantial difference between the Body of Christ truly present in His entirety in the Eucharistic species and the Body of Christ realized mystically by the union of the living members of the Church with her divine Head.

This confusion would have then permitted not a few progressive or completely heretical theologians to wink at Protestants thanks to the imprecise formulation of “Body of Christ.”

What Viganò appears to be asserting is Ratzinger’s synthesis allowed modernists in the Church to minimize belief in the Eucharist with potentially ambiguous language in order to please protestants (or be like them!). Yet the concerns Viganò raises about Fr. Ratzinger’s younger progressive views are not new, and were actually covered extensively in this excellent book view by Maike Hickson of a 2017 Ratzinger biography and posted at Rorate Caeli: New biography describes great influence of Fr. Joseph Ratzinger in Vatican II: https://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2020/12/rorate-exclusivenew-biography-describes.html

Abp. Viganò: Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI is wrong to praise the diabolical revolution of Vatican II: https://www.lifesitenews.com/opinion/abp-vigano-pope-emeritus-benedict-xvi-is-wrong-to-praise-the-diabolical-revolution-of-vatican-ii/

CLMC comment: As we know, Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI did much good to bring back the Traditional Latin Mass and was doctrinally orthodox when he served as the head of doctrine for Pope St. John Paul II. So how could he also be author of some problematic ideas and actions from the 1950s and at Vatican II? It’s a complex story but one that needs to be discussed more. Why? Because this approach may affect the current and future of the Latin Mass. One of the liturgical renewal “approaches” that came from Pope Benedict’s Summorum Pontificum could be called “Hegelian”. In essence, Pope Benedict XVI seemed to float the idea that the Traditional Latin Mass (thesis?) and Novus Ordo (antithesis?) could mutually enrich one another, giving the impression that eventually the two forms would merge someday into one united Mass (synthesis?). Yet as we’ve learned from Dr. Peter Kwasniewski and others, the two Masses are practically two different rites and appear to be irreconcilable.  The CLMC continues to be grateful for Pope Benedict liberating the Latin Mass and will let more competent minds answer this question and issues. We do however invite readers to read the Rorate Caeli article above as it is illuminating. (Ed. note – we are most willing to be corrected in our meager attempt to summarize this difficult, complex, and yet important topic)

  • The Reverent Novus Ordo in Peril: The above article on Ratzinger might serve as a primer for this interesting and brief podcast about the future of the “reverent” Novus Ordo. In sum, the author posits that the heavy intellectual support for making the Novus Ordo reverent is drying up (John Paul II & Pope Benedict XVI), and as we see in Rome today, there is little interest in continuing this effort, leaving the Latin Mass the more stable and sure option for a reverent liturgy. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C_ayEcZh_Z0 (Click here for transcript)
  • Archbishop Chaput Remarks on the Latin Mass Restrictions: To close this third news article about the post-conciliar liturgical framework, we share a concerning interview with Archbishop Charles Chaput, a conservative bishop who recently retired as Archbishop of Philadelphia. Sadly, His Excellency, in responding to a question about the 2021 motu proprio restricting the Latin Mass, appears to accept some of the decades old modernist scarecrow arguments that Latin Mass attendees do not actively participate in the Mass, and that the Novus Ordo Mass corrects that problem. You can watch the video here (at 8:15): https://youtu.be/PGjuBnqxCRw?t=493 or visit the article: https://www.lifesitenews.com/blogs/abp-chaput-adds-insult-to-injury-for-arlington-catholics-who-love-the-latin-mass/  

CLMC note: We share this, not in any disrespect for His Excellency (who has defended the faith in other matters), but as a reminder that the liturgical viewpoint of even conservatives is quite far from those of traditionalists (those attending the Latin Mass) and much closer to the modernists. For a good counterpoint to His Excellency’s views on active participation we share a recent article by Phil Lawler with some helpful analogies: https://www.catholicculture.org/commentary/what-active-participation-really-means/

Late November Feast Days

This week as the liturgical year winds down, the traditional calendar has some unique feasts in late November. We share a few along with some helpful background both spiritually and historically.

  • Feast of St. Cecilia: This Tuesday November 22 is the feast of St. Cecilia, the patroness of musicians. Dom Prosper Gueranger had a great reflection on her life and noted she can be an excellent saint to overcome fear. Since many people are anxious or have fear over our country, problems in the Church, etc. – she might be a good saint to have recourse to:

    Without doubt, this zeal is not extinct; it still works in some, and its fruits rejoice and console the Church; but why does it slumber so profoundly in so many hearts which God had prepared to be its active centres? The cause is unhappily to be traced to that general coldness, produced by effeminacy, which might be taken by itself alone as the type of the age; but we must add thereto another sentiment, proceeding from the same source, which would suffice, if of long duration, to render the debasement of a nation incurable. This sentiment is fear; and it may be said to extend at present to its utmost limit. Men fear the loss of goods or position, fear the loss of comforts and ease, fear the loss of life. Needless to say, nothing can be more enervating, and consequently more dangerous to the world, than this humiliating pre-occupation but above all, we must confess that it is anything but Christian. Have we forgotten that we are merely pilgrims on this earth? And has the hope of future good died out of our hearts? Caecilia will teach us how to rid ourselves of this sentiment of fear. In her days, life was less secure than now. There certainly was then some reason to fear; and yet Christians were so courageous, that the powerful pagans often trembled at the words of their victims. https://fsspatl.com/liturgical-year/438-sanctoral-cycle/november-end-of-the-year/3366-november-22-st-caecelia-virgin-and-martyr
  • Feast of Pope St. Clement I: Wednesday November 23, is the feast of St. Clement, the 4th Pope. Dom Gueranger has a fascinating story that confirms Papal Primacy. A controversy broke out in the early Church of Corinth during Clement’s reign when St. John was still alive and nearby in Ephesus, yet the Corinth Church wrote to Pope Clement in Rome for his assistance, demonstrating papal authority:  

    The Corinthians at last felt the necessity of putting an end to a disorder, which might be prejudicial to the extension of the Christian faith; and for this purpose, it was requisite to seek assistance from outside. The Apostles had all departed this life, except St. John, who was still the light of the Church. It was no great distance from Corinth to Ephesus, where the Apostle resided; yet it was not to Ephesus but to Rome that the Church of Corinth turned. Clement examined the case referred to his judgment by that Church, and sent to Corinth five commissaries to represent the Apostolic See.. https://fsspatl.com/liturgical-year/438-sanctoral-cycle/november-end-of-the-year/3367-november-23-st-clement-i-pope-and-martyr
  • Feast of St. Catherine of Alexandria:  Friday November 25 is the feast of St. Catherine of Alexandria who was taken off the calendar in 1969 when the Novus Ordo Mass was introduced but later restored by Pope St. John Paul II in 2002 (it always remained on the Traditional Calendar). She is one of the 14 Holy Helpers, and as this article notes, perhaps a good recourse against Protestant heretics: http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2020/11/st-catherine-of-alexandria-in-counter.html (As a reminder the TLM calendar has several saints who were unjustly removed in 1969 including St. Christopher, St. Philomena – the Novus Ordo’s loss remains our gain!)


  • The Miraculous Medal: Saturday November 27 is the optional feast of Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal. To learn more about this feast day visit Fisheaters.com: https://www.fisheaterscom/miraculousmedal.html

Sunday Commemorates the end of the world. What Mass will you be attending Sunday, and at the end of time?

Major Exhibition of Relics: St. Vincent de Paul Catholic Church

Laudetur Iesus Christus!

This coming Friday, November 18, 2022, there will be a major exhibition of Holy Relics being presented at St. Vincent de Paul Catholic Parish (Charlotte) in the Holy Family Chapel from 6:00pm to 9:00pm.

There will be more than 150 Relics on exhibit, including (partial listing):

I. Our Lord Jesus Christ:
     a) Divine Infancy Relics: Manger, Cradle, Swaddling Bands;
     b) Instruments of the Passion: True Cross, Thorn, Purple Cloak, Pillar of Scourging, Veronica’s Veil, Title of the Cross, Scala Sancta Stairs . . .
II.   Relics of Our Lady: Veil, Slipper, Tunic, Holy House of Loreto . . .
III.  St. Joseph, Foster Father of Christ: Staff & Cloak.
IV.  Sts. Joachim & Ann, Our Lady’s Parents: Bone
V.   Twelve Apostles, Four Evangelists: Bone; Cross of Apostles Peter & Andrew, Cincture & Tunic of St. John Evangelist;
VI.  St. John the Baptist: Bone & Flesh;
VII. St. Mary Magdalene: Bone & Hair-Shirt;
VIII. New Testament Saints: Sts. Elizabeth & Zachary, Martha & Lazarus, Simeon Prophet, Three Magi, Holy Innocents 
IX.  Carmelite Saints: Teresa of Avila, John of the Cross, Therese the Little Flower X. Our Patron: St. Philomena, Virgin-Martyr
XI. Saints of the Canon: Agnes, Cecilia, Agatha, Lucy, Stephen, Lawrence, Cosmas & Damian 
XII Clergy-Martyrs: Ignatius of Antioch, Blaise, Polycarp, Erasmus, Januarius . . .
XIII. Soldier-Martyrs: George, Demetrius, Sebastian, Theodore, Maurice . . .
XIV. Other Saints: Pius V & Pius X, Anthony of Padua, John Vianney, Maria Goretti, Dominic, Thomas Aquinas, Francis of Assisi .

“God did extraordinary miracles through Paul, so that when the handkerchiefs or aprons that had touched his skin were brought to the sick, their diseases left them, and the evil spirits came out of them.”
– Acts 19:11-12

Relics are a means to put us in direct contact with the Saints who have gone before us. Veneration of relics not only allows us to ask intercession of Saints but also make concrete the real possibility of holiness in our own lives because the Saints were simply normal people living lives of extraordinary holiness. There will be first (bone, blood, or body parts), second (a possession or article of clothing), and third (anything that has touched a first or second) class relics from various Saints available for veneration. The custodian of these relics, Mark Grillo, will be providing information about some of the individual relics as well as instructing on proper methods of veneration for relics. Information will be provided in both Spanish and English.

Food will be available for sale in the parking lot in front of the Activity Center to enjoy before or after you see the relics. Seating will be available inside the Activity Center for people to enjoy food and company with their fellow parishioners, friends, and family before or after visiting the relics.

Food vendor:  Magdalena’s Taco Truck and Ice Cream starting at 5:30pm
Cash & Card accepted

Sponsored by the Parish Catechesis Department of St. Vincent de Paul and Regina Caeli Academy.

There will be a donation basket available to make a good will offering at the door.

Please direct questions to Mrs. Riley V. Provost, Director of Parish Catechesis St. Vincent de Paul Parish – Charlotte, NC Office Tel: (704)644-4651

Memorial Tribute for Fr. Christopher Riehl (+)

Laudetur Iesus Christus!  After posting the news of Father Riehl’s passing, we received the following memorial tribute from Mr. Nathaniel Slattery who was both a close friend and the editor of Fr. Riehl’s recently published book on the Blessed Mother entitled, “Listen to Our Lady”

We share this memorial tribute with Mr. Slattery’s permission:

Rev. Christopher Michael Riehl

Father Christopher Michael Riehl told me and my wife that we came into the Church at the twelfth hour of Her passion. We also came into his life in the twelfth hour, and so as I write this, I know that I will say very little about him.

Father Riehl was a good and holy priest, recognized by many as suited for leadership in the Church. He possessed the virtues of courage, wisdom, and magnanimity in the correct proportions, at least from my humble lay point of view, in order to revivify and renew a diocese. Likely, in a just and ordered society, he would have been a bishop shortly, and this is exactly what he would have been doing. He would have extracted his body, mind, heart, and soul of all of its energy and capacity, jogged from one end of the diocese to the other, and removed every semblance and hair of error from every corner such that the faithful could have looked and seen nearly the spotless Bride of Christ within his diocese, or until he collapsed. But this would have necessarily involved ruffling many feathers, not lay so much as clerical, and no doubt very, very many people would be removed by the gravity of their errors. That is why he was not a bishop, and very likely we will never see a bishop like him before Our Lady triumphs. He was exactly the type of person that intimidates the type of priest with which most people live.

Maybe I didn’t know him well enough, maybe I was transported with joy at finding more than a single holy priest (my own parish has a holy priest who knew that his job was to provide the Sacraments these last couple of years), maybe I am a dirty flatterer (pray God no), but this is what I see. We live in such a time, bathed by oceans of infant blood, steeped in the darkness once reserved for homosexual relations before they were allowed to speak up near the altar on Father’s Day in a Catholic Church in Chicago, and under the boot of our Nominalist overlords, that we don’t deserve priests and bishops and popes that remove error and dispel confusion. We have ancestors that for hundreds of years have likely prayed that their progeny would not convert to Catholicism. We have the pride to judge God Himself, and we blaspheme the Holy Ghost to pass the time in our boredom. We live under curses, justly earned, and so we live under poor shepherds.

But God still creates these men in the womb and suckles them in the Sacraments, because His Glory and Holiness are too intoxicating to allow it not to happen. So they exist, and what He seems to do is this: prevent them from having any authority, hide them away from the world that hates Him, and let them do other things than help save people who don’t deserve it.

That is what Father Riehl was. He was a good and holy man, who with all of the capacity and virtue of a saintly bishop in the chrysalis, instead wrote a humble book, and now we can read it. He may not have been suited for writing, which is good, because it is tiresome to read pretty words that say nothing, and those types of books and documents are easy enough to find within the Church. He was suited for salvation and sanctification.

I knew him only a year, and in that year, he perfected my devotional life, consecrated me completely to Mater Dolorosa, and enflamed my desire for sanctity. I firmly believe he was in the rich odor of his own sanctity. His last work was his book, Listen to Our Lady (Or Go To Hell), and you all should read it, because Our Lady took him right after he put down his pen.

—Nathaniel Slattery, Editor

Twenty-Third Sunday After Pentecost (Salisbury Latin Mass 4pm)

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Sunday is the 23rd Sunday after Pentecost. As the Church approaches the end of the liturgical year (next Sunday), it focuses on the end of the world and last judgement. We share a reflection on the orations (prayers) for Sunday’s Latin Mass: https://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2020/11/divine-participation-and-human-dangers.html#.Y3B7QuTMKHs

All Souls Thank You: The CLMC wishes to thank everyone to came out to the annual All Souls prayers at Belmont Abbey last week (co-sponsored with St. Ann Homeschool). Please also offer a few Hail Mary’s for Fr. Reid for taking the time to lead the prayers for the poor souls.

Salisbury Latin Mass Today Sunday November 13 4pm

There is a Latin Mass today 4pm at Sacred Heart parish in Salisbury (rescheduled from last week).  Fr. Joseph Wasswa will offer the Mass. There will not be a social afterwards due to a schedule conflict with the parish hall. For more information visit: http://salisburylmc.org/

Latin Masses This Week

  • Wednesday November 16, 6pm – St. Ann, feast of St. Gertrude, Virgin
  • Thursday November 17, 7pm – St. Thomas Aquinas, feast of St. Gregory Thaumaturgus, Bishop
  • Friday November 18, 7am (St. Ann) & 12:30pm (St. Mark) – Dedication of the Basilicas of Ss. Peter & Paul

Advent-Christmas Liturgies (as announced to date)

We are still 2 weeks away from Advent, and six weeks away from Christmas. However to assist families in planning, there are a few Latin Masses and events to announce below. As more parishes announce their Advent/Christmas schedule, we will share them in future updates.

  • Rorate Latin Masses (Latin Mass by Candlelight at Dawn on a Saturday in Advent)
    • Saturday December 3, 6am – St. Thomas Aquinas parish (no 10am Mass this day)
    • Saturday December 10, 6am – Holy Cross parish in Kernersville (1.5 hours north of Charlotte)
  • Sunday December 18, 12:30pm – St. Ann parish & the CLMC’s annual blessing of religious objects after the 12:30pm Latin Mass
  • Feast of the Natvity Christmas Day Sunday December 25:
    • Midnight Latin Masses: St. Thomas Aquinas, St. Ann, Our Lady of the Angels in Marion (1.75 hours northwest of Charlotte)
    • 11:30am Latin Mass: St. Thomas Aquinas (Note: There will not be a 12:30pm Latin Mass at St. Ann on Christmas Day)

Community News

  • Second Fr. Ripperger Talk Added For Friday March 10: Due to the overwhelming interest in hearing exorcist and traditional theologian, Fr. Chad Ripperger, St. Thomas Aquinas parish is now hosting a second, identical talk, by Fr. Ripperger on Friday March 10. Please see the parish’s note:

    Due to the Saturday, March 11, 2023 event filling up so quickly, Fr. Codd asked Fr. Ripperger if he would be willing to come on Friday, March 10, 2023, to do an additional identical conference, in order to allow for more parishioners and folks from the diocese to attend.  Fr. Ripperger graciously agreed, and so we will now have him speak both on Friday and Saturday.  Note, these will be the same talk on both days.  Saturday is already full.  If you are signed up already to attend Saturday, please do not register for Friday as well, or we will delete your registration.  Please register as soon as possible in order to help us with planning.  As well, if you are able to help support us bringing Fr. Ripperger in for an additional talk, please use the registration form to do so, or use this link.  Thank you! https://www.osvhub.com/st-thomas-aquinas-rc-church/forms/frripperger-friday
  • Prayers for Fraternity of St. Peter Seminarians to Receive Minor Orders: Next Saturday November 19, David Carter, a former St. Ann parishioner, and now seminarian with the Fraternity of St. Peter (FSSP), a society of Latin Mass priests, is scheduled to receive a second set of Minor Orders. Please consider keep Mr. Carter and all FSSP seminarians that day in your prayers.
  • Holy Face Devotions (new updates)
  • St. Mark – Mondays 2-2:45pm
  • St. Thomas Aquinas – Tuesdays 6am in the main church
  • St. Ann – Tuesdays 7:30am in the chapel after the Novus Ordo Mass (uses the booklet/chaplet which takes 15-20 minutes)
  • **St. Michael the Archangel, Gastonia ** – Tuesdays, 6:30-7pm, Holy Family Room (NEW)
  • **Holy Spirit, Denver ** – Tuesdays 10-11am after the Novus Ordo Mass (NEW: BEGINS TUESDAY NOVEMBER 15)

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • Post-Election: the Law of Politics is the Salvation of Souls: As Americans digest the election results and its impact pro-life and pro-family matters, OnePeterFive posted a helpful reminder that Catholics should not place their trust institutions to win the culture war, rather it lies with the Church and her faithful to spread the traditional faith: https://onepeterfive.com/post-election-law-politics-salvation-souls

CLMC note: Interestingly, the St. Andrew Missal notes that Sunday’s gospel about the women being healed after touching Christ’s garment is also tied to Sunday’s theme of the end times. The St. Andrew Missal explains that as Christ went to heal the daughter of Jairus (ruler of the synagogue) a women with a blood disorder approaches Christ, touches the hem of His garment and is healed. The women who was healed first represents the Gentiles as she receives the Gospel (Christ) first, but then the daughter of the synagogue ruler (symbolizing the Jews), is also healed and restored to life, symbolizing the conversion of the Jews, who receive the Gospel second, at the end times.

  • New Anglican Catholic community finds welcome in Hendersonville: The Catholic News Herald published an intriguing article on the new Anglican Ordinariate community, St. Edmund Campion Catholic Church, currently meeting at Immaculate Conception parish in Hendersonville (2 hours west of Charlotte). For those unaware, the Anglican Ordinariate is sort of like a special global diocese established by Pope Benedict XVI in 2009 as a pastoral response to help bring Anglicans and others back into the Catholic Church. Its liturgy is considered a form of the Roman Rite and the American Ordinariate Bishop is based out of Houston, Texas. The Herald’s article, shares the story of how the St. Edmund Campion community formed near Asheville: https://catholicnewsherald.com/88-news/fp/8709-new-anglican-catholic-community-finds-welcome-in-hendersonville

CLMC note: In Hendersonville there is a faithful community that follows a different form of the Roman Rite, with its own distinct liturgy, with its own chaplain, on its way to becoming its own parish someday  – all embraced and supported by the Diocese of Charlotte. The CLMC can only presume, with much goodwill, that this article and arrangement marks a new policy for diocese in that they are now recognizing that a Roman Rite community, with its own form of the Roman Rite Mass, should have its spiritual needs met by a dedicated chaplain and, eventually, its own building. We are pleased the diocese is supporting this new change in policy by embracing the Anglican Ordinariate and look forward to the diocese extending the same hospitality and equity toward the Latin Mass community in the not so distant future.

The CLMC continues to invite the Latin Mass faithful to pray for the establishment of a Latin Mass chapel in the Charlotte area, and staffed by the priests of the Fraternity of St. Peter, who can minister to the faithful without restrictions.

Thriving in a Post-Christian World: An American’s First Encounter with Catholic Ireland

We close this update with an inspiring article about the Catholic faith and Latin Mass in Ireland. Once a gem of a Catholic country, and now only a place where vocations are nearly dormant, as well as the Catholic faith. However, Rachel Shrader, reports otherwise. She recently visited the Emerald Isle and wrote about how a Latin Mass chaplain in Dublin is doing his small part to turn the Irish faith around by starting up an Oratory of St. Philip Neri at a parish in Dublin (something St. John Henry Newman tried to do). This Oratory is a congregation, originally founded by St. Philip Neri in the 16th century and priests now staff parishes they are assigned at, with a charism to “revitalize the faith of the people”. We provide a few excerpts which relates to the Latin Mass at this Dublin parish (St. Kevin) where the Oratory is housed; however the entire article is worth a read:

Oratorians just…do what they do. They celebrate Mass, they welcome people into their church, they hear Confessions—day in and day out. They don’t relocate, they don’t hurry—and they don’t give up. I like to call it the “Oratorian pace.”

Miraculously, the results seem to follow.

Since COVID times, the Oratorians of St. Kevin’s noticed an increase in attendance at their parish, and a decrease in the average age.

This youthful crowd is particularly drawn to the Latin Mass, which is celebrated twice on Sunday mornings. Between those two Masses, St. Kevin’s welcomes 500-600 (and increasingly more) faithful each week, coming from as far away as 50 miles…

Fr. Deighan also noted that the priests are “swamped” with confessions, which is always a great sign of sincere and ardent faith. St. Kevin’s being the only parish in the city that offers confessions on Sundays—the most convenient time for out-of-towners—two priests hear confessions on Sunday morning. (During Mass, if necessary!)

With the decline of authentic Catholicism in Ireland, Fr. Deighan explained that people of faith are simply going to have to unite and build up strong communities of faith again.

He says that this is what is happening at St. Kevin’s, with the traditional Mass as the rallying point. He then went on to explain why the young congregation of St. Kevin’s—and he himself—find it so attractive.

“[The Latin Mass] just is such a wonderful vehicle for evangelization,” [Fr. Deighan] said, “spreading the Faith, while not appearing to do so at all, but it just draws people like a magnet, young people, and they’re fascinated by it. And it’s genuine, it’s not a superficial thing, they keep coming back. They’ll spend an hour and half at Mass and they’ll go to Confession. This would not be happening if it wasn’t the traditional Mass.”

“Obviously Mass is always Mass, but with the old Mass you go out with a joy, that you’re meeting this wonderful bride, again, for the first time.”

Latin Mass Chaplaincy Dublin: https://www.latinmassdublin.ie/

What Mass is revitalizing Dublin and countless other communities today? What Mass are you attending Sunday?

RIP Fr. Christopher Riehl (+)

Laudetur Iesus Christus! It is with sadness that we share the news that Fr. Christopher Riehl, a Latin Mass priest formerly with our diocese, has passed away yesterday. 

For those who may remember, Fr. Riehl came from the Diocese of Knoxville (TN) and was assigned to St. Thomas Aquinas parish around 2014 and offered the Latin Mass frequently. He was later assigned to St. John the Evangelist in Waynesville before returning to his home diocese in Knoxville. Father Riehl was invited to briefly return to Charlotte in April 2020 to offer the St. Ann Latin Triduum at Charlotte Catholic High School, but sadly those plans did not take shape. This is the second loss for St. Thomas Aquinas parishioners in recent weeks. Please pray for the repose of his soul, and for consolation of his family (his father is a deacon at St. John the Baptist in Tryon).

We share the announcement made by the Basilica of Ss. Peter & Paul in Chattanooga and His Excellency Richard Stika (bishop of Knoxville), where Fr. Riehl was serving.

Fr. Christopher Riehl passed away last night. Fr. Riehl was a priest in residence at the Basilica in 2018. He celebrated his 45th birthday on Monday, November 7. Bishop Stika sent the following announcement to the Diocese of Knoxville early this morning. Funeral arrangements will be forthcoming.

Brothers and Sisters,

I wish to inform you of the death of Fr. Chris Riehl from complications of diabetes.  Fr. Chris died shortly before midnight. He had been making progress in his recovery, but this segment of his life ended at Tennova last night.

Please remember Fr. Chris and his family in your moments of prayer.

+RS

Bishop Richard StikaMay Fr. Christopher Riehl rest in peace.

We will keep everyone posted if any arrangements are announced.

Requiem Mass Tonight & No 7am Latin Mass Friday

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Today Thursday November 10 is the feast of St. Andrew Avellino, the 16th century confessor and member of the Theatines religious order. We have a few updates to share today.

  • No 7am Latin Mass Tomorrow Friday November 11 at St. Ann: There will not be a 7am Latin Mass tomorrow Friday November 11 at St. Ann parish. There will be a 12:30pm Latin Mass at St. Mark parish on Friday.
  • Sunday Latin Mass 4pm in Salisbury: This Sunday at 4pm there will be a Latin Mass at Sacred Heart parish in Salisbury. The Mass, normally held first Sunday, was rescheduled for this Sunday November 13 at 4pm. Fr. Joseph Wasswa, parochial vicar at Our Lady of Grace parish will offer the Mass. A social and pot-luck in Brincefield Hall immediately following Holy Mass.  Feel free to bring an hors d’oeuvres or favorite dessert.  For more information please visit the Salisbury Latin Mass Community at: www.salisburylmc.org

Martinmas (feast of St. Martin) Friday November 11

This Friday the Church honors the great bishop, St. Martin of Tours and his feast day became the thanksgiving and harvest celebration throughout Catholic Europe in centuries past. Families would attend Mass, and spent the day in celebration, and feasting on cooked goose. It has been noted that the U.S. Thanksgiving holiday, instituted by protestants, was to some degree based on this ancient Catholic feast day (more on that in a few weeks).To learn more about this feast day and a mini-Lent that accompanied it, we share these excellent articles posted on OnePeterFive and Fisheaters: