Feast of St. Philomena (August 11)

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Blessed feast of St. Philomena, the Wonderworker (August 11), a 3rd century martyr (possibly earlier) whose relics were rediscovered in the Roman catacombs in the early 1800s. Her feast is not currently on the calendar and in fact when it was, it was only a local feast day, not universal. Still, she remains a popular saint today, and was a powerful intercessor for St. John Vianney (whose feast day was eight days prior to today). Many others had devotion to her including Pope St. Pius X, and many miracles occurred with the translation of her relics from Rome to Mugnano (Italy) in 1803. What the Church knows about her comes from her appearance to a Dominican Nun in 1833:

St. Philomena Resources

Local St. Philomena Devotions

  • St. Mark Parish in Huntersville features a stained glass window on the west transept of St. John Vianney who is holding an image of St. Philomena
  • St. Elizabeth in Boone has just installed a custom made statue of the saint in the side chapel
  • The CLMC features a small statue of St. Philomena on our welcome table in the St. Ann narthex on Sundays

There is also a Latin Mass this evening at 7pm at St. Thomas Aquinas parish. Although not offered for her feast day, one could offer intentions that she be restored to the liturgical calendar (and universally!)

St. Philomena, pray for us!


St. Laurence the Martyr

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Today Tuesday August 9 is the vigil of St. Laurence (or Lawrence) the Martyr, a day of penance and preparation for tomorrow’s feast day honoring the deacon who was martyred on the gridiron. St. Laurence’s martyrdom was also preceded six days prior by the martyrdom of Pope Sixtus II, making St. Laurence the highest ranking clergy in Rome at that time. Incidentally, this vigil day also commemorates St. Romanus, a soldier that St. Laurence converted shortly before his martyrdom.

Tomorrow’s feast day retains its importance in the Church as it is one of the few feast days that still retains its own vigil the day prior, similar to the vigil of the Assumption (August 14), Vigil of the Nativity (December 24), etc. This is not to be confused in the Novus Ordo with the concept of anticipatory Masses, which are offered the evening before a feast or Sunday. As Greg DiPippo in the New Liturgical Movement notes, a vigil retains its own liturgical day with its own set of reading and prospers, and has violet vestments:

Latin Mass – Feast of St. Laurence:

Tomorrow Wednesday August 10 there will be the regular 6pm Latin Mass at St. Ann parish, which has a statue of the deacon-martyr in the main church.

Importance of the Feast of St. Laurence

Some may ask – why is the Church giving extra attention to one of the many important martyrs who died in Rome? As Dom Prosper Gueranger explains, it was St. Laurence’s heroic martyrdom which brought about the end of paganism in Rome, allowing its eventually conversion to the Catholic faith:

Just as Peter and Paul are the riches, not of Rome alone, but of the whole world, so Laurence is called the honor of the world, for he, as it were, personified the courage of martyrdom. At the beginning of this month, we saw Stephen himself come to blend his dignity of Protomartyr with the glory of Sixtus II’s deacon, by sharing his tomb. In Laurence, it seemed that both the struggle and the victory of martyrdom reached their highest point; persecution, it is true, was renewed during the next half century, and made many victims, yet his triumph was considered as the death-blow to paganism.

“The devil,” says Prudentius, “struggled fiercely with God’s witness, but he was himself wounded and prostrated forever. The death of Christ’s martyr gave the death-blow to the worship of idols, and from that day Vesta was powerless to prevent her temple from being deserted. All these Roman citizens, brought up in the superstitions taught by Numa, hasten, O Christ, to thy courts, singing hymns to thy martyr. Illustrious senators, flamens and priests of Lupercus venerate the tombs of Apostles and Saints. We see patricians and matrons of the noblest families vowing to God the children in whom their hopes are centered. The Pontiff of the idols, whose brow but yesterday was bound with sacred fillet, now signs himself with the cross, and the Vestal Virgin Claudia visits thy sanctuary, O Laurence.”

Traditions for the feast of St. Laurence

There are some customs and traditions that accompany the feast of St. Laurence and are described in these articles:

In closing, we share the words of the poet Prudentius, who is quoted by Dom Gueranger in The Liturgical Year, for August 10:

“Once the mother of false gods, but now the bride of Christ, O Rome, it is through Laurence thou art victorious! Thou hadst conquered haughty monarchs and subjected nations to thine empire; but though thou hadst overcome barbarism, thy glory was incomplete till thou hadst vanquished the unclean idols. This was Laurence’s victory, a combat bloody yet not tumultuous like those of Camillus or of Cesar; it was the contest of faith, wherein self is immolated, and death is overcome by death. What words, what praises suffice to celebrate such a death? How can I worthily sing so great a martyrdom.”

St. Laurence, pray for us, pray for Rome!

Ninth Sunday After Pentecost (The Fall of Jerusalem)

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Sunday is the 9th Sunday after Pentecost, in which the church also subtly marks the fall of Jerusalem in 70AD. We provide several references and commentaries in the section below.

Masses today: Sunday August 7 is also is 1st Sunday, and there will be a 4pm Latin Mass at Sacred Heart parish in Salisbury. There will of course be the regular 12:30pm Latin Mass at St. Ann parish as well.

Diocesan Latin Masses This Week

  • Wednesday August 10 – Feast of St. Lawrence, St. Ann 6pm
  • Thursday August 11 – Feria, St. Thomas Aquinas, 7pm (prior to 1960, it was the feast of St. Philomena in some localities)
  • Friday August 12 – St. Clare, St. Ann, 7am, St. Mark 12:30pm

The Tears of St. Lawrence Meteor Shower: St. Lawrence’s feast day is an important feast day and there is a special meteor shower that occurs around his feast day and bears his name. To learn more and how to view it visit: https://www.fisheaters.com/stlawrence.html  (Another meteor shower also is tied to St. Lucy’s feast day of December 13)

Other feasts this week: August the 11th is the feast of St. Philomena, the Wonderworker and Martyr. Sadly her feast day was removed in 1960, but since many in our community has a devotion to her, there is nothing preventing us from attending a Latin Mass this day and praying for her feast day to be restored. To learn more please visit her shrine and gift shop at: http://philomena.us/

Feast of the Assumption Latin Masses (Monday August 15)

  • 7am, St. Ann parish
  • 6pm, Our Lady of Grace parish, Greensboro, NC (2 hours north of Charlotte)
  • 6:30pm (followed by a Marian procession) , Our Lady of the Lake, Chapin, SC, 195 Amicks Ferry Rd, Chapin, SC (2 hours south of Charlotte)
  • 7pm, Solemn High Mass, Prince of Peace parish, Taylors, SC 1209 Brushy Creek Road, Taylors, SC (2 hours southwest of Charlotte

The feast of the Assumption is not a holy day of obligation this year in the US due to it falling on a Monday (per the USCCB), but why not make it a personal holy day of obligation and attend Latin Mass and honor Our Lady?

Dr. Peter Kwasniewski Returns to Charlotte – September 2nd, 7pm

The CLMC is pleased to announce that Dr. Peter Kwasniewski will return to Charlotte next month to offer a special lecture for the CLMC, entitled:

The Primacy of Tradition and Obedience to the Truth

Friday September 2

Aquinas Hall (St. Thomas Aquinas Parish), 1400 Suther Road, Charlotte

5:30pm Cocktails/Meet & Greet

7pm Lecture

7:45pm Panel Discussion & Q&A

9pm Book Signing

This lecture will be a sequel to his talk to us last November, and build upon his new book, True Obedience in the Church. Moreover, the event will also feature a special panel discussion which includes Dr. Kwasniewski and two other noted liturgical writers including Greg DiPippo from the New Liturgical Movement, and Christopher Owens of the Veterum Sapientia Institute (The Latin Institute co-founded by Fr. Barone). The panel will answer your questions about the future of the Latin Mass. It will be moderated by the CLMC’s own Brian Williams.  Please invite your friends and spread the word.

The Fall of Jerusalem

This fateful event, prophesized by Our Lord (Luke 19:41-48) and commemorated this Sunday, was one of the more horrific sieges in history.  Dom Prosper Gueranger noted that the Temple of Jerusalem flowed with blood, most of its inhabitants killed, not just by Roman soldiers from without, but by the lawless, unspeakable violence of Jewish Zealots (upon their own people) from within inside the city walls. Further north, the sea of Galilee turned red as bodies piled up along the shoreline after that Jewish revolt was crushed by the Romans. Jewish historian Josephus had reported that years prior to the siege, residents of Jerusalem would see signs in the sky including a flaming meteorite/sword and chariots foretelling the pending doom (Luke 21:11). The Catholics, seeing the signs, were spared the terror as they remembered Christ’s prophecy (Luke 21:21, Matthew 11:21-24), and escaped to safe harbor.

As Dr. Mike Foley notes in his article below: “The destruction of the Temple is a stern reminder of divine chastisement and the need for our repentance and conversion. As St Paul teaches in the day’s Epistle (1 Cor. 10, 6-13), we must never think we stand on our own, lest we fall.”. For a fuller account of the siege please see these articles:

We close this section with Gueranger’s sober warning of the fall of Jerusalem and its meaning for the Church today:

Terrible lesson, all this! The Church learned it, and never forgot it:—the lesson that no blessing, no past holiness, is, of itself, a guarantee that the place thus favored will not afterwards draw down on itself desecration and destruction!

Holy Face Devotions & New Book

Tired of the attacks on the Latin Mass and its devotees? Why not push back by praying the powerful Holy Face devotion of reparation? As background, in 1843, Sr. Mary of St. Peter, a Carmelite nun in the monastery in Tours, France, received a series of revelations from Jesus telling her that reparation for certain sins were an imperative, and that it was to be done through devotion to the Holy Face.  The primary purpose of this apostolate is to, by praying certain prayers, make reparation for the sins committed against the first three Commandments of the Lord: The denial of God by atheism (communism), blasphemy, and the profanation of Sundays and Holy Days. Devotion to the Holy Face has been referred to as the devotion for Jesus Crucified.  It should be noted that Communists hate the Latin Mass. The schedule is as follows:

  • St. Mark – Mondays 2-3pm
  • St. Thomas Aquinas – Tuesdays 6am in the main church
  • St. Ann – Tuesdays 7:30am in the chapel after the Novus Ordo Mass (uses the booklet which takes 15-20 minutes)

New Book on the Holy Face Devotion: TAN Books has just announce a new book on the Holy Face devotion by Fr. Lawrence Carney, a Latin Mass priest in Missouri who is chaplain to the Benedictines of Mary. The book is entitled The Secret of the Holy Face: The Devotion Destined to Save Society. If you want to learn more about this powerful devotion, please visit: https://tanbooks.com/products/books/tan-books/pre-order/the-secret-of-the-holy-face/

Supporting Sensus Fidelium: Last week we featured the new Catholic alternative to YouTube, SCTV (Sensus Fidelium TV), developed in part by Sensus Fidelium, the online Catholic apostolate. The great work of this apostolate doesn’t come free and as such, for those whose lives have been touched by the work of Sensus Fidelium, we encourage those whose lives have been touched by the work of Sensus Fidelium, to consider supporting it financially, if you choose: https://sensusfidelium.com/

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • How Goodwill Was Squandered: Occasionally one may stumble upon the fabled “unicorn” of all liturgies – the completely reverent Novus Ordo Mass (chant, ad orientum, Communion on the tongue only, etc.). At this encounter, there is a temptation to think that if these rare (unicorn) Novus Ordo Masses were offered in every parish, there would be no need for the Traditional Latin Mass. This is untrue, but this article in Rorate Caeli does note that there would be a lot more goodwill between traditionalists and Church hierarchy if they actually did care about curbing abuses in the Novus Ordo Mass (instead of suppressing the Latin Mass): https://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2022/08/how-goodwill-was-squandered.html#more
  • The Welcome Demise of Enforced Optimism: As sobriety sets into the post-conciliar Church, where many conservatives have finally realized that the Church has not reached the springtime, Dr. Kwasniewski welcomes the demise of the faux-optimist that followed the Vatican II Council: https://onepeterfive.com/welcome-demise-enforced-optimism/
  • Fighting the Church may lead you right out of the Church: Catholic World Report has a sobering article of the few high profile Catholics who left the Catholic faith after being frustrated with the Church’s in action on various moral and liturgical issues. https://www.catholicworldreport.com/2022/08/03/fighting-the-church-may-lead-you-right-out-of-the-church/

    CLMC comment: Will the recent restrictions on the Latin Mass cause some Latin Mass faithful, weak in their faith, to abandon Catholicism? What can faithful bishops, clergy and dioceses do to help prevent this and save the souls of their faithful?

Bishops and the Traditional Latin Mass – Cutting Through the Fear

There has been much angst over the restrictions announced in Arlington, Washington DC, Savannah, and supposedly in Chicago.  So much that one may believe that all bishops are caving and imposing draconian restrictions due alleged pressure from Rome. Yet is that really true? Let’s take a look:

  • San Francisco – On July 1, Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone offered a beautiful Pontifical Solemn High  Mass to commemorate California’s own St. Junipero Serra, the founder of many of the Franciscan mission churches in the 18th century. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zoUM-gKBeiQ&t=2478s
  • Newark (NJ) – On July 16, Bishop Emeritus of Paterson (NJ), Arthur Serratelli offered a Pontifical Latin Mass in his home parish in the Archdiocese of Newark for the feast of Our Lady of Mount Carmel: https://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2022/08/recent-celebrations-of-our-lady-of-mt.html#.Yu9U2RzMKHt
  • Dallas – On July 26, Bishop Edward Burns of Dallas paid a visit to the Latin Mass parish and participated in solemn vespers: https://materdeiparish.com/bishop-burns-visit/
  • Atlanta –  On Saturday June 4, at the very hour that Archbishop Hartmayer visited our diocese to confer diaconate ordinations, in Bishop Jugis’ absence, his Auxiliary Bishop Bernard Shlesinger was offering a Pontifical Mass and Traditional Confirmations at the Latin Mass parish in Atlanta – the metropolitan see of Charlotte (e.g. our archdiocese).

These are but recent examples, but a look back further shows that the Auxiliary Bishop of Chicago Joseph Perry offered a Pontifical Mass for the feast of the Assumption 2021, and even more, Bishop Peter Libasci of Manchester, NH erected a Latin Mass only – personal parish, both weeks following Traditiones Custodes. Some may wonder if its time to head for the hills, lay low, or run for cover. Yet these bishops aren’t running. Why should we?

Why are you fearful, O ye of little faith? (Matthew 8:26)

What Mass are you attending Sunday?

SAVE THE DATE: Dr. Peter Kwasniewski Returns to Charlotte – Friday September 2, 7pm

Laudetur Iesus Christus! There has been much concerning news about the Latin Mass in recent weeks, however, today we are pleased to announce that our friend, Dr. Peter Kwasniewski will return to Charlotte next month to offer a special lecture for the CLMC, entitled:

The Primacy of Tradition and Obedience to the Truth

Friday September 2

Aquinas Hall (St. Thomas Aquinas Parish), 1400 Suther Road, Charlotte

5:30pm Cocktails/Meet & Greet

7pm Lecture

7:45pm Panel Discussion with Q&A

9pm Book Signing

This lecture will be a sequel to his talk to us last November, and build upon his new book, True Obedience in the Church. Moreover, the event will also feature a special panel discussion which includes Dr. Kwasniewski, and two other noted liturgical writers, Greg DiPippo from the New Liturgical Movement, and Christopher Owens of the Veterum Sapientia Institute (Fr. Barone’s Latin Institute). The panel will be there to answer your questions about the future of the Latin Mass. It will be moderated by the CLMC’s own Brian Williams.

The event is free and all are invited to the meet & greet reception prior.  We attach a flyer for the event.

Portiuncula Plenary Indulgence Tomorrow August 2nd

Laudetur Iesus Christus and blessed feast of the Holy Maccabees (see article here)! As noted in our weekend update, tomorrow Tuesday August 2nd, is the feast of St. Alphonsus Liguori, the great doctor of moral theology. It is also a day when the Church offers a special plenary indulgence called the Portiuncula Indulgence, which commemorates the little chapel where St. Francis of Assisi discovered his vocation.

Portiuncula Indulgence

The indulgence was originally only available to those who visited the chapel in Italy, but now extends to the universal church.  The indulgence can be made any time after Vespers this evening Monday August 1st and before sundown on Tuesday August 2nd.  A plenary indulgence is available under the usual conditions:

1. Receive sacramental confession (8 days before of after)

2. Receive the Holy Eucharist at Holy Mass on August 2nd

3. Enter a parish church and, with a contrite heart, pray the Our Father, Apostles Creed, and a pray of his/her own choosing for the intentions of the Pope

Please see this link for more details: https://sensusfidelium.com/2019/07/29/portiuncula-indulgence-from-vespers-august-1st-to-sundown-on-august-2nd/

First Sunday Latin Mass in Salisbury: Sunday August 7 will also see the monthly 4pm First Sunday Latin Mass offered at Sacred Heart parish in Salisbury. Fr. Michael Carlson (St. Mark parish) will offer the Mass. Attendees are invited to join the a pot luck social following Mass in Brincefield Hall, which is in the building to your right as you exit the church.  Bring a favorite dish, hors d’oeuvres or dessert to share. For questions or to signup for the Salisbury Latin Mass Community’s e-mail list visit: www.salisburylmc.org

Supporting Sensus Fidelium

Lastly, in our weekend update, we shared the amazing new Catholic TV platform Sensus Fidelium TV (SFTV) created by Sensus Fidelium, the online traditional Catholic apostolate founded by Steve Cunningham who along with his family lives and attends the Latin Mass here in Charlotte. This apostolate has helped keep the flame of tradition and the Latin Mass burning strong in the souls of so many (including converts) thanks to the great Latin Mass sermons and catechesis hosted on its many platforms.  Sensus Fidlium is a great Catholic response to the “cancel culture” and the new TV platform takes it to a new level. This won’t be canceled by Big Tech or Rome anytime soon.

However, from its website to the new SFTV platform, running these programs naturally incur some costs. The CLMC doesn’t make pitches for donations often, but if you’ve benefited from Sensus Fidelium’s work and programs over the years (like Fr. Ripperger’s talks), this may be worthy of your support (it is for us). The contact info is below:  

Sensus Fidelium

PO Box 189

McAdenville, North Carolina 28101

Online donation page: https://sensusfidelium.tv/ (see “Donate” link on right corner or click here)

BTW, have you viewed exorcist Fr. Chad Ripperger’s latest conference yet? If not, you can begin to watch Part I on SFTV here: https://sensusfidelium.tv/watch/duties-of-the-church-2022-conference-1-of-3-fr-ripperger_7nj1FCQOyay2iVq.html (more videos in Sunday’s update)

Eight Sunday After Pentecost

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Sunday is the eight Sunday after Pentecost, and the readings, and particularly the Divine Office this week focuses on Solomon’s building of the Temple (whose destruction will be told next Sunday).  As custom we provide commentary on the Collect for Sunday’s Mass: https://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2020/07/what-the-eighth-sunday-after-pentecost.html    

Diocesan Latin Masses This Week

Community News

  • No 1st Saturday Latin Mass in Charlotte Diocese on Saturday August 6:  The Diocese of Charlotte has directed all parishes to cancel Masses on Saturday August 6 – including the three diocesan 1st Saturday Latin Masses* – so people can attend the Eucharistic Congress. Sadly, despite the CLMC’s hand-delivered letter to Bishop Jugis at the Synod requesting a Latin Mass at the Eucharistic Congress, the laity’s needs have again been neglected by the Chancery (who were entrusted with our letter).  It’s been said that people can make their 1st Saturday Mass/devotion at the Novus Ordo Mass offered at the conclusion of the Congress (e.g. the anticipatory Mass). Sadly, this insensitive policy, perhaps done by accident, not only excludes Latin Mass faithful who have concerns about Eucharistic sacrilege at such mega-liturgies, but also discriminates against the poor faithful who may not be able to afford the fuel costs to travel from remote parts of the diocese to attend the Congress, and for the frail or those uncomfortable driving into the congested labyrinth of streets and parking garages of Uptown Charlotte. Most of all however, it denies the honor and reparation due to Our Lady which would have been offered by the many who now will be unable to receive Holy Communion and fulfill the first Saturday devotions under this arrangement. This is an unfortunate spiritual situation that could have been (and still could be) averted with some simple pastoral solicitude within the diocese. In years past, the Congress has been a beautiful source of unity, but in more difficult times has sowed some division and perpetuates the perception that the Chancery ignores or filters the needs of the laity. Please pray to Our Lady of Fatima for a last minute miracle.

*The CLMC did inquire about an earlier 1st Saturday Latin Mass at St. Thomas Aquinas, but it was not feasible. There will not be 1st Saturday Latin Masses in Boone or Tryon either.

  • Holy Face Devotions: Tired of the attacks on the Latin Mass? Why not push back by praying the powerful Holy Face devotion of reparation? As background, in 1843, Sr. Mary of St. Peter, a Carmelite nun in the monastery in Tours, France, received a series of revelations from Jesus telling her that reparation for certain sins were an imperative, and that it was to be done through devotion to the Holy Face.  The primary purpose of this apostolate is to, by praying certain prayers, make reparation for the sins committed against the first three Commandments of the Lord: The denial of God by atheism (communism), blasphemy, and the profanation of Sundays and Holy Days. Devotion to the Holy Face has been referred to as the devotion for Jesus Crucified.  It should be noted that Communists hate the Latin Mass. The schedule is as follows:
  • St. Mark – Mondays 2-3pm
  • St. Thomas Aquinas – Tuesdays 6am in the main church
  • St. Ann – Tuesdays 7:30am in the chapel after the Novus Ordo Mass (uses the booklet which takes 15-20 minutes)
  • Feast of the Assumption – Monday August 15: So far the only announced Latin Masses for the feast of the Assumption are:
    6:30pm Latin Mass followed by a Marian Procession at Our Lady of the Lake Parish, 195 Amicks Ferry Rd, Chapin, SC (2 hours south of Charlotte).
    7:00pm Solemn High Latin MassPrince of Peace Parish, Taylors, SC, 1209 Brushy Creek Road, Taylors, SC, 9am (2 hours southwest of Charlotte).

    If more Latin Masses are announced we will share them.

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • Diocese of Arlington Cancels Many Latin Masses: Last week we noted how St. John the Baptist parish in Front Royal, VA, in the diocese of Arlington, now offers a Traditional Latin Mass daily. While this is good news, the diocese of Arlington – one of the most beloved “conservative” diocese in the U.S., that was “friendly to Latin Mass” has decided to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory by now canceling many other Latin Masses at multiple parishes and consolidating them into just a few locations, such as Front Royal. We provide Rorate Caeli’s post on the matter: https://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2022/07/segregation-is-restored-in-diocese-of.html#more

CLMC comment: This may sound surprising, but traditionalists shouldn’t see this as a persecution as much as an opportunity – specifically, a much needed exodus plan. Ultimately, the Latin Mass and Novus Ordo cannot exist peacefully in the same parish building over the long term as this framework can lead to divisions. Moreover the Latin Mass has a full liturgical calendar along with customs and culture that needs to be unfurled, and is frequently blocked or limited by the natural needs of the Novus Ordo community. Latin Masses deserve their own dedicated chapels and priests. Eastern Rite Communities face a similar situation as they retain their own liturgical calendar, rituals, customs and traditions. Do not they deserve their own church someday? To answer that question, we share a helpful explanation from the website of St. Mary’s Syro-Malabar parish, which was established in 2017 right here in Charlotte:

  • “The desire to have our own place to celebrate mass in Syro-Malabar rite has been growing among the community members for a long time. We need a church facility to congregate, share in friendship & common bonds with others in the community. This will enable us to receive the sacraments in our traditional way, celebrate our traditional activities like annual retreat, perunnal, etc. Which is not imaginable in other churches under diocese of Charlotte. Introducing the next generation to the “Traditional values with which we all grew up” is invaluable by any measures to many community members.”

The CLMC couldn’t have said it better. If it’s acceptable for an Eastern Rite Catholic Community in Charlotte to have its own church building, why not a Traditional Latin Mass Community?

Sensus Fidelium TV launches with New Fr. Ripperger Conference

Sensus Fidelium, the online Catholic apostolate, which features thousands of traditional sermons, spiritual meditations, and Dom Gueranger’s commentaries, and is based here in Charlotte and run by our friend Steve Cunningham, has now launched its most important endeavor to date, a new online TV platform called Sensus Fidelium TV: https://sensusfidelium.tv/

To kick-off the new medium, it has just posted an excellent conference given by traditional theologian and exorcist, Fr. Chad Ripperger, who founded a society of traditional exorcists. To see all four videos (which are excellent), please click on the links:

Early August Feasts & Commemorations

  • Portiuncula Indulgence this Tuesday August 2nd: This Tuesday is the feast of St. Alphonsus Liguori, the great doctor of moral theology. It is also a day when the Church offers a special plenary indulgence called the Portiuncula Indulgence, which commemorates the little chapel where St. Francis of Assisi discovered his vocation. The indulgence was originally only available to those who visited the chapel in Italy, but now extends to the universal church.  The indulgence can be made any time after Vespers on Monday August 1st and before sundown on Tuesday August 2nd.  A plenary indulgence is available under the usual conditions – please see this link for details: https://sensusfidelium.com/2019/07/29/portiuncula-indulgence-from-vespers-august-1st-to-sundown-on-august-2nd/
  • August 6 – the feast of the Transfiguration of Our Lord: This feast marks when Our Lord took Ss. Peter, James and John up to Mt. Tabor where they saw Our Lord glorified, along with Moses and Elijah. To learn more about the traditions of this feast day visit Fisheaters.com: https://www.fisheaters.com/customstimeafterpentecost5.html

Feast of the Holy Maccabees – August 1st

The second commemoration of August 1st is an often overlooked feast day, that of the Holy Maccabees – the only Old Testament saints listed in the universal 1962 calendar (The Carmelites do commemorate another Old Testament great, the Prophet Elijah).  These seven holy Maccabee brothers were martyred defending the rights of God and for His public worship in a pagan culture. Their relics are actually buried in the same church that houses the chains of St. Peter. For more on the liturgical aspects of this feast day visit: http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2018/08/the-feast-of-holy-maccabees.html#.XyOweX57nwc

It’s also a good time to be thankful for the many of the modern day Maccabees in the Church (some who have passed on to their eternal reward) who in the dark/confusing liturgical days of the 1970s and 1980s defended, sacrificed and suffered for the Traditional Mass when most in the Church were opposed to it. Yet their perseverance through the years (1971 Agatha Christie indult, 1984 Quattuor Abhinc Annos indult, and 1988 Ecclesiae Dei Moto Proprio, and 2007 Summorum Pontificum Moto Proprio), has enabled us to benefit from their sacrifices here in Charlotte each Sunday and on select weekdays. 

The Maccabean Saints give us much to reflect on as another persecution of the Traditional Latin Mass is occurring.

Here are some select commentaries on the Maccabees:

Dom Prosper Gueranger writes:

The sacred cause of which they were the champions, their strength of soul under the tortures, their sublime answers to the executioners, were so evidently the type reproduced by the later Martyrs, that the Fathers of the first centuries with one accord claimed for the Christian Church these heroes of the synagogue, who could have gained such courage from no other source than their faith in the Christ to come. For this reason they alone of all the holy persons of the ancient covenant have found a place on the Christian cycle; all the Martyrologies and Calendars of East and West attest the universality of their cultus, while its antiquity is such as to rival that of St. Peter’s chains in that same basilica of Eudoxia where their precious relics lie.

Their faith is also echoed in a sermon given by a New York priest in 2017:

First, we see how important it is to fight against assimilation into a pagan culture. Initially, the Jews of that time were subjected to a “soft” persecution, which offered them rewards for abandoning the traditions of their fathers (for example, circumcision and refusal to eat pork). When that didn’t work, “hard” persecution ensued. Don’t we find the same modus operandi today? How many would-be Catholic politicians have sold their Catholic souls for acceptability in a political party of death, which also promotes a vision of marriage inimical to both the natural law and divine revelation? How many Catholics work in offices and public service in this city yet are completely unknown as Catholics since their lifestyle blends in seamlessly with that of the secular culture (or anti-culture)? In effect, they are content to be crypto-Catholics, even though Our Lord commanded us: “What you hear whispered, proclaim from the housetops” (Mt 10:27).

https://www.catholicworldreport.com/2017/08/01/lessons-from-the-holy-maccabees/

As we are now entering into another period of liturgical persecution, we may consider praying that may God send us more modern day Maccabees – especially among the clergy.

The Maccabees of the 1970s and 1980s helped preserve the Traditional Latin Mass for this generation. What Mass are you attending Sunday?

Seventh Sunday After Pentecost

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Sunday is the seventh Sunday after Pentecost and ancient vigil of St. James the Apostle. We provide the commentary for the Sunday propers: https://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2020/07/fruit-free-will-and-providence-seventh.html#.XxPG3xJ7nwc   

Additionally we share Dom Prosper Gueranger’s commentary for Sunday, courtesy of Sensus Fidelium: https://sensusfidelium.com/the-liturgical-year-dom-prosper-gueranger/the-time-after-pentecost/seventh-sunday-after-pentecost/

Diocesan Latin Masses This Week

  • Wednesday July 27: Commemoration of St. Pantaleon, 6pm Latin Mass, St. Ann parish
  • Thursday July 28: Feast of Ss. Nazarius and Celsus; Pope St. Victor I, and Pope Innocent I, 7pm St. Thomas Aquinas
  • Friday July 29: Feast of St. Martha (“octave day” of St. Mary Magdalene), 7am Latin Mass St. Ann parish, 12:30pm Latin Mass, St. Mark parish

Community News

  • Holy Face Devotions: Tired of some Church leaders disparaging the Latin Mass? Why not push back by praying the powerful Holy Face devotion of reparation? As background, in 1843, Sr. Mary of St. Peter, a Carmelite nun in the monastery in Tours, France, received a series of revelations from Jesus telling her that reparation for certain sins were an imperative, and that it was to be done through devotion to the Holy Face.  The primary purpose of this apostolate is to, by praying certain prayers, make reparation for the sins committed against the first three Commandments of the Lord: The denial of God by atheism (communism), blasphemy, and the profanation of Sundays and Holy Days. Devotion to the Holy Face has been referred to as the devotion for Jesus Crucified.  It should be noted that Communists hate the Latin Mass. The schedule is as follows:
  • St. Mark – Mondays 2-3pm
  • St. Thomas Aquinas – Tuesdays 6am in the main church
  • St. Ann – Tuesdays 7:30am in the chapel after the Novus Ordo Mass (uses the booklet which takes 15-20 minutes)
  • Traditional Vespers Tonight July 24, 7pm, Our Lady of Grace, Greensboro, NC: To conclude the Sacred Music seminar at Our Lady of Grace parish in Greensboro, there will be Traditional Vespers sung at 7pm tonight Sunday July 24. Please note: This will be the 1962 Vespers, which is aligned with the Traditional Latin Mass different from St. Joseph’s College Seminary’s Novus Ordo Vespers offered certain Sundays at St. Ann in Charlotte. This is a rare opportunity to participate in the traditional Divine Office. Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 2203 W. Market St. Greensboro, NC 27403

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • Archdiocese of Washington Suppresses All Parish Latin Masses: As expected, Cardinal Wilton Gregory in Washington has suppressed many of the diocesan Latin Masses and relegated them to Sunday-only Latin Masses at non-diocesan chapels.Also suspended were the Easter Triduum, Easter Sunday, Pentecost, and Christmas (and presumably feasts).https://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2022/07/archdiocese-of-washington-suppresses.html

CLMC note: There are a few questions worth asking: 1) What will the Latin Mass priests of the Archdiocese of Washington do in response to this suppression? Will they defend the Mass Christ loved so much he allowed this august sacrifice to be offered for 1,600 years and counting? Will they risk poverty, loss of reputation, even loss of material comforts to defend the Latin Mass and their flock? 2) What will Latin Mass priests in Charlotte Diocese so if a similar decree is issued here? The moment of truth may be arriving soon. The March 2020 COVID lockout of the Catholic faithful from Mass here by Charlotte priests was not a good sign of things to come. In addition to praying for Cardinal Gregory, and our own Bishop, Peter Jugis, please consider praying for the Latin Mass priests. How they act in this crisis will not just impact the Latin Mass faithful, but will be an important instruction for all the future priests who are also watching (e.g. the seminarians and future vocations).

  • Diocese of Arlington parish expands Latin Mass to EVERY DAY: While one diocese in the DC area has suppressed Latin Masses, another is expanding them. On Friday July 8, the parish of St. John the Baptist in Front Royal, Virginia announced that Arlington Bishop Michael Burbidge has given permission for the parish to offer a Traditional Latin Mass every day. The parish already offered a weekday Latin Mass each Monday, Wednesday, Friday, and Sunday. Now it is daily.

CLMC note: Interestingly, the announcement was made in the presence of two diocese of Charlotte seminarians who happened to be visiting and served the Latin Mass there that morning.  As the Diocese of Charlotte is too a “Latin Mass friendly” diocese, the CLMC is still searching for that lone diocesan parish in Charlotte which offers the Latin Mass daily (and perhaps at least twice Sunday), which is a minimum criteria for a “Latin Mass friendly” diocese. If our readers find such a parish, please contact us.

  • The Legal Positivism of the Pro-Life Movement: OnePeterFive posted an interesting essay on how most Catholics, particularly conservative Catholics, blindly follow legal positivism instead of the traditional teaching of the Church with respect to laws and authority. The author, citing St. Thomas Aquinas, opines that if a proposed law does not meet St. Thomas’ criteria for a law, it is not actually a law at all and should be ignored. This should be applied with abortion, where Catholic public officials should have ignored Roe vs. Wade and banned abortion anyway: https://onepeterfive.com/legal-positivism-pro-life-movement

Latin Mass Feasts of July (and Commentary)

The Soul of the Child – St. John Chrysostom

With the overturning of Roe vs. Wade  one month ago today, Saturday’s monthly Respect Life Mass, and the Mass of the Angels Mass on Thursday, these are all reminders of the importance of defending the sanctity of human life and the innocence of a child, especially in a state of grace. Moreover having the innocence and purity of a child is important and necessary for anyone who seeking to enter the Kingdom of Heaven (as Father Leo Haydock’s Catholic Bible Commentary notes for Mark 10:14). To emphasize this teaching, a reader providentially pointed us to the beautiful words of St. John Chrysostom, on “the soul of the child”, which were fittingly quoted by Dom Gueranger for the feast of St. Jerome Æmilian this past Wednesday July 20:

“‘The soul of the child,’ as the Church tells us to-day by the golden mouth of St. John Chrysostom, ‘is free from all passions. He bears no ill-will towards them that have done him harm, but goes to them as friends, just as if they had done nothing. And though he be often beaten by his mother, yet he always seeks her and loves her more than anyone else. If you show him a queen in her royal crown, he prefers his mother clad in rags, and would rather see her unadorned than the queen in magnificent attire; for he does not appreciate according to riches or poverty, but by love. He seeks not for more than is necessary, and as soon as he has had sufficient milk he quits the breast. He is not oppressed with the same sorrows as we, nor troubled with care for money and the like; neither is he rejoiced by our transitory pleasures, nor affected by corporal beauty. Therefore our Lord said: Of such is the kingdom of heaven, wishing us to do of our own free will what children do by nature.’[1]

Their guardian angels, as our Lord Himself said, gazing into those pure souls, are not distracted from the contemplation of their heavenly Father: for He rests in them as on the wings of Cherubim, since baptism has made them His children. Happy was our saint to have been chosen by God to share the loving cares of the angels here below, before partaking of their bliss in heaven.”

The Latin Mass is often noted for its welcomeness to young children and large families. What Mass are you attending Sunday?

Sixth Sunday After Pentecost

Laudetur Iesus Christus!Sunday is the sixth Sunday after Pentecost and we share commentary Sunday’s orations (prayers) for the Latin Mass: https://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/07/the-palpably-agricultural-and-mildly.html

Diocesan Latin Masses This Week

  • Wednesday July 20, St. Jerome Emiliani (Confessor), 6pm Latin Mass, St. Ann parish
  • Thursday July 21, St. Lawrence of Brindisi (Doctor), 7pm Latin Mass, St. Thomas Aquinas
  • Friday July 22, St. Mary Magdalene (Penitent), 7am Latin Mass, St. Ann, and 12:30pm St. Mark
  • Saturday July 23, St. Apollinaris (Martyr), 8am Respect Life Latin Mass, St. Ann

Community News

  • Holy Face Devotions: Tired of some Church leaders disparaging the Latin Mass? Why not push back by praying the powerful Holy Face devotion of reparation? As background, in 1843, Sr. Mary of St. Peter, a Carmelite nun in the monastery in Tours, France, received a series of revelations from Jesus telling her that reparation for certain sins were an imperative, and that it was to be done through devotion to the Holy Face.  The primary purpose of this apostolate is to, by praying certain prayers, make reparation for the sins committed against the first three Commandments of the Lord: The denial of God by atheism (communism), blasphemy, and the profanation of Sundays and Holy Days. Devotion to the Holy Face has been referred to as the devotion for Jesus Crucified. The schedule is as follows:
  • St. Mark – Mondays 2-3pm
  • St. Thomas Aquinas – Tuesdays 6am in the main church
  • St. Ann – Tuesdays 7:30am in the chapel after the Novus Ordo Mass (uses the booklet which takes 15-20 minutes)

Feast of Our Lady of Mt. Carmel

Saturday was the great Marian feast of Our Lady of Mt. Carmel.  As custom, Fisheaters has a good write up on the brown scapular and the Sabbatine Privilege which accompanies those who wear it faithfully: https://www.fisheaters.com/scapulars.html

Additionally, it’s also a great time to support traditional Carmelites who offer and follow the Traditional Carmelite Rite (similar to the Traditional Latin Mass). We share two congregations, one of hermits, the other of the sisters:

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • How excessive restrictions on the Latin Mass could push away some ordinary Catholics: In the above post, Fr. Z references a surprising article published by America magazine, the official publication of the Jesuits, and hardly the place of fondness for the Latin Mass and tradition. However, they did publish a piece by a conservative Catholic who likes to attend those reverent (and seemingly rare) Novus Ordo Masses which have Latin, chant, and ad orientum worship. The author warns that dioceses – including Chicago – who are being heavy handed with their Latin Mass restrictions, may actually alienate Novus Ordo Catholics who like a little reverence and tradition mingled into the Novus Ordo Mass. https://www.americamagazine.org/faith/2022/07/15/latin-mass-restrictions-pope-francis-242539

Traditiones Custodes: One Year Later

Saturday also marked the one year anniversary of the infamous Traditiones Custodes, Pope Francis’ decree restricting the Latin Mass in many situations. Greg DiPippo has helpful review on it, here: https://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2022/07/one-year-later.html#.YtOX4oTMKHs

The CLMC wishes to re-share what we wrote just days after the Motu Proprio’s release last July and we stand by it today:

July 18, 2021: While many may be anxious over the Pope’s new decree “restricting” the Latin Mass, one should remember that Christ still reigns over His Church, and that Christ loves the Traditional Latin Mass so much that he allowed it to be offered for most of His Church’s history, at least1,600 years and counting. One cannot say that for the Novus Ordo, which is 52 years (and may not make it to 60!). Many of the primary Novus Ordo proponents are aging, dying or dead, and an entirely new generation of priests and laity have discovered the Traditional Latin Mass – born years and decades after Vatican II. The action from Rome last week may be seen perhaps as an act of desperation of a dying regime, whose collapse may occur sooner than expected.  

An excellent secular example of regime collapse actually happened 30 years ago this summer.  In August of 1991 the Cold War was practically over, the Berlin Wall was down, Germany reunified, free elections were being held across Eastern Europe, and former Soviet Union satellite states were angling for independence.  However, for a group of hardline Soviet communists, this turn of events was a disaster and must be reversed. In mid-August 1991, these eight hardliners launched a coup to depose the Soviet Leader Mikhail Gorbachev (also a communist), who they blamed for the implosion. The coup lasted but 3 days, and failed, as pro-independence forces rallied against them. However the end result was an further acceleration of the Soviet Union’s demise. Four months later on Christmas Day 1991 the nation dissolved itself and the Soviet Union ceased to exist.

Although no analogies are perfect, Traditionis Custodes, appears to represent a similar “dying gasp” of the aged Vatican II generation in the Church. While Traditionis Custodes’ imposition may last longer than a 3 day “Soviet coup”, it should be no surprise, as CLMC readers will note over the many months, that the Novus Ordo Mass, and its ambiguous new “doctrine” may be seeing its final days.  The modernists still can’t believe that after 50+ years of propaganda, tyrannical suppression of tradition, and modernist seminary formation, that there could be any Catholics left alive who would still like the Traditional Mass and its perennial teachings. Such modernists apparently have not attended many Latin Masses.

What to do?

  1. Pray for Pope Francis’ conversion: He is only getting older, and like us someday, will soon have to face judgement (which, due to his state in life is much more difficult than any lay person). Pray for his conversion, pray he consecrates Russia to the Immaculate Heart. Archbishop Viganò had a massive conversion after meditating on his own life, and look how much good he has done since then.
  2. Pray for our priests and Bishop Jugis: Pray they will have the strength and fortitude to defend Our Lord Jesus Christ and HIS Traditional Latin Mass.
  3. Pray the Rosary daily and Make/practice the 1st Saturday Devotions: Following Our Lady of Fatima’s request ought to be obligatory for anyone attending the Traditional Latin Mass
  4. Continue to Promote the Traditional Latin Mass: The Latin Mass IS the future.  Continue to invite friends and family to attend the Latin Mass, promote it anyway you can.
  5. Don’t worry: Focus on one’s state in life, receive the sacraments frequently, heed little about what is happening in other dioceses, Rome, or at some faraway place. As we learned with COVID, much of the modernist media rhetoric is designed to cause fear and agitation, not reporting news.

Lastly, we’d like to close with a timely quote by Pope St. John Paul II, who issued an interesting apology to traditionalists in 1980 encyclical for those heavy-handed tactics of the Vatican II proponents (credit: Dr. John Rao at the Roman Forum):

“I would like to ask forgiveness-in my own name and in the name of all of you, venerable and dear brothers in the episcopate-for everything which, for whatever reason, through whatever human weakness, impatience or negligence, and also through the at times partial, one-sided and erroneous application of the directives of the Second Vatican Council, may have caused scandal and disturbance concerning the interpretation of the doctrine and the veneration due to this great sacrament. And I pray the Lord Jesus that in the future we may avoid in our manner of dealing with this sacred mystery anything which could weaken or disorient in any way the sense of reverence and love that exists in our faithful people.” – John Paul II, Dominicae Cenae #12, February 24, 1980

https://www.vatican.va/content/john-paul-ii/en/letters/1980/documents/hf_jp-ii_let_19800224_dominicae-cenae.html

The Latin Mass is the future. Where are you attending Mass today?

Traditional Blessing of Sacramentals this Saturday 12 noon

Laudetur Iesus Christus and blessed feast of St. Bonaventure, the great Seraphic doctor of the Church. To learn more about this great saint please see Dom Prosper Gueranger’s entry for today in The Liturgical Year: https://staging2.sensusfidelium.com/the-liturgical-year-dom-prosper-gueranger/july/july-14-saint-bonaventure-cardinal-doctor-of-the-church/ St. Thomas Aquinas parish will offer a 7pm High Mass this evening.

Traditional Blessing of Sacramentals – Saturday July 16, 12 noon (St. Thomas Aquinas)

This Saturday July 16, is the feast of Our Lady of Mt. Carmel, and although there is no Latin Masses in Charlotte, there will be a blessing of sacramentals (water, oil, salt, candles, and medals) in the traditional rite at 12 noon at St. Thomas Aquinas parish. The blessing is part of a conference entitled hosted by St. Thomas Aquinas parish entitled: Spiritual Warfare: Authority, Vocation, and Spiritual Protection in the Family

It features local author Charles Fraune who wrote Slaying Dragons: What Exorcists See and What We Should Know. The book has received endorsements from Bishops Schneider, Gracida, and Strickland. Mr. Fraune also attends the Traditional Latin Mass at St. Thomas Aquinas. Please note: The Mass mentioned in the flyer is not a Latin Mass, but the blessing will be of the traditional rite.

452nd anniversary of Quo Primum

Lastly today is also the 452nd anniversary of the promulgation of Quo Primum by St. Pius V, which assures that the Tradition Latin Mass is continually permitted and cannot be altered, or revoked – even unto this day. Here is an excerpt:

Furthermore, by these presents [this law], in virtue of Our Apostolic authority, We grant and concede in perpetuity that, for the chanting or reading of the Mass in any church whatsoever, this Missal is hereafter to be followed absolutely, without any scruple of conscience or fear of incurring any penalty, judgment, or censure, and may freely and lawfully be used. Nor are superiors, administrators, canons, chaplains, and other secular priests, or religious, of whatever title designated, obliged to celebrate the Mass otherwise than as enjoined by Us. We likewise declare and ordain that no one whosoever is forced or coerced to alter this Missal, and that this present document cannot be revoked or modified, but remain always valid and retain its full force notwithstanding the previous constitutions and decrees of the Holy See, as well as any general or special constitutions or edicts of provincial or synodal councils, and notwithstanding the practice and custom of the aforesaid churches, established by long and immemorial prescription – except, however, if more than two hundred years’ standing.

https://www.papalencyclicals.net/pius05/p5quopri.htm

It is noteworthy to mention that the Traditional Latin Mass has been offered for more than 200 years as Trent requires. The same cannot be said for other liturgies offered in the Church, or even in this diocese today.

What Mass is can be more aligned with the Council of Trent?