Third Sunday After Pentecost

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Sunday is the third Sunday after Pentecost and as custom we share a commentary on Sunday’s Mass: https://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2022/06/the-merciful-orations-of-third-sunday.html#.YrfYhezMKHt

Sunday is also traditionally the 3rd day within the ancient octave of St. John the Baptist (whose feast was also called “Summer Christmas”) which fittingly is placed just days away from the great feasts of Ss. Peter and Paul (Wednesday), and this symbolism linking these two feasts was not missed by Dom Prosper Gueranger, who notes:

John the Baptist, placed on the confines of the two Testaments, closes the prophetic age, the reign of Hope, and opens the era of Faith which possesses the long expected God, though as yet without beholding him in his Divinity. Thus even before the Octave is ended, wherein we pay our homage to the son of Zachary, the apostolic confession comes grafting itself on the testimony rendered by the Precursor to the Word, the Light.

Upcoming Feast Days & Masses

There is much symbolism interwoven in the upcoming feast days, many were placed there in connection to the octaves which occurred on the liturgical calendar prior to 1955 (e.g. octaves of St. John the Baptist and Ss. Peter & Paul)

  • Tuesday June 28 – Vigil of Ss. Peter and Paul: Major feast days in the traditional calendar are often proceeded by a preparatory vigil ahead of the great feast, and often penitential in nature. As such, the feast of Ss. Peter and Paul is commemorated with a vigil on Tuesday. There are no Latin Masses scheduled in Charlotte this day, regrettably.
  • Wednesday June 29 – Feast of Ss. Peter & Paul, 6pm Latin Mass, St. Ann: Commemorates the day of their of martyrdom by Nero, June 29 67 A.D.
  • Thursday June 30 – Commemoration of St. Paul, 7pm Latin Mass, St. Thomas Aquinas: The Church, giving St. Peter, the first pontiff, more emphasis in Wednesday’s feast day, now gives St. Paul his own special “feast day” commemorating his martyrdom.
  • Friday July 1 – Feast of the Precious Blood, 7am (St. Ann), 12:30pm (St. Mark): This is a feast that is unique to the Traditional Latin Mass, and was eliminated in the Novus Ordo Mass (or combined with the feast of Corpus Christi). Providentially this year, the Precious Blood feast falls on the ancient octave day of the feast of the Sacred Heart. You can pray the litany to the Precious Blood here: https://www.fisheaters.com/litanypreciousblood.html
  • Saturday July 2 – Feast of the Visitation & first Saturday, 10am (St. Thomas Aquinas): This feast falls on the ancient octave day of St. John the Baptist, finishing off the eight-day celebration of his nativity, the day when he would be circumcised (and given his name John) by focusing on the visitation of the Blessed Mother, and the moment he was cleansed of original sin (Luke 1:41). The feast of the visitation would probably mark the actual time when the Blessed Virgin Mary would have concluded her 3-month visit with St. Elizabeth and Zachary and return to Nazareth.  

Community News

  • Holy Face Devotions: Three parishes in Charlotte now offer the Holy Face devotions – a timely and powerful devotion to combat communism (among which abortion is its “anti-sacrament”). As background, in 1843, Sr. Mary of St. Peter, a Carmelite nun in the monastery in Tours, France, received a series of revelations from Jesus telling her that reparation for certain sins were an imperative, and that it was to be done through devotion to the Holy Face.  The primary purpose of this apostolate is to, by praying certain prayers, make reparation for the sins committed against the first three Commandments of the Lord: The denial of God by atheism (communism), blasphemy, and the profanation of Sundays and Holy Days. Devotion to the Holy Face has been referred to as the devotion for Jesus Crucified.  The schedule is as follows:
  • St. Mark – Mondays 2-3pm
  • St. Thomas Aquinas – Tuesdays 6am in the main church
  • St. Ann – Tuesdays 7:30am in the chapel after the Novus Ordo Mass (uses the booklet which takes 15-20 minutes)

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • Traditional Catholicism – Peter Kwasniewski with Raymond Arroyo: Dr. Peter Kwasniewski, (who visited the CLMC last fall), was interviewed by EWTN’s Raymond Arroyo about recent criticism in Rome about Latin Mass attendees, and how they are “against Vatican II”. In his usual scholarly brilliance, Dr. Kwasniewski turns the tables and shows how those very church leaders who accuse traditionalists, are themselves acting against the text of the Vatican II documents: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sMrWt7hYjVI
  • A Neglected Gem in the Traditional Roman Missal: The Eucharistic Heart of Jesus: Separately, Dr. Kwasniewski also penned a great article on the rediscovery of a beautiful votive Mass which occurs during the Thursday within the Octave of the Sacred Heart of Jesus (this Thursday June 30). This Mass which was in use prior to 1955 is entitled the Eucharistic Heart of Jesus and in a sense links the feast of Corpus Christi with the Sacred Heart of Jesus. https://onepeterfive.com/neglected-gem-eucharistic-heart-jesus/

Commemoration of St. Paul (June 30)

We share Dom Prosper Gueranger’s reflection on St. Paul’s feast day for this Thursday June 30 (which is different from his conversation on January 25)

On the Twenty-ninth of June, in the year 67, while Peter, having crossed the Tiber by the Triumphal bridge, was drawing nigh to the cross prepared for him on the Vatican plain, another martyrdom was being consummated on the left bank of the same river. Paul, as he was led along the Ostian Way, was also followed by a group of the Faithful who mingled with the escort of the condemned. His sentence was that he should be beheaded at the Salvian Waters. A two miles’ march brought the soldiers to a path leading eastwards, by which they led their prisoner to the place fixed upon for the martyrdom of this, the Doctor of the Gentiles. Paul fell on his knees, addressing his last prayer to God; then having bandaged his eyes, he awaited the death-stroke. A soldier brandished his sword, and the Apostle’s head, as it was severed from the trunk, made three bounds along the ground; three fountains immediately sprang up on these several spots. Such is the local tradition; and to this day, three fountains are to be seen on the site of his martyrdom, over each of which an altar is raised.

Martyrdom of St. Peter (June 29)

After reflecting upon St. Paul above, we conclude this update with a commentary by Dom Prosper Gueranger, on the bigger of the two feasts and saints (e.g. St. Peter), and the focus on St. Peter’s confrontation with his nemesis, the anti-Pope, Simon the Magician, who first appeared in Acts 8:9-24, and reappears in Rome around 67 AD. St. Peter confronted and defeated this false vicar of Christ, actions which ultimately led to St. Peter’s glorious martyrdom. Gueranger notes this confrontation is a reminder that “false brethren” have been present in the Church since its earliest days:

But before quitting earth, Peter must triumph over Simon the Magician, his base antagonist. This heresiarch did not content himself with seducing soul by his perverse doctrines; he sought even to mimic Peter in the prodigies operated by him. So he proclaimed that on a certain day, he would fly in the air. The report of this novelty quickly spread through Rome, and the people were full of the prospect of such a marvellous sight. If we are to believe Dion Chrysostom, Nero seems even to have entertained at his court this wonderful personage, who pledged himself to soar aloft in mid-air. More than that, the emperor would even with his own presence honor this rare sight. The imperial lodge was reared upon the Via Sacra, where the scene was to be enacted. But cruel for the impostor did this deception prove. “Scarce had this Icarus begun to poise his flight,” says Suetonius, “than he fell close to Nero’s lodge which was bathed in his blood.” The gravest writers of Christian antiquity are unanimous in attributing to the prayer of Peter this humiliation inflicted on the Samaritan juggler in the very midst of Rome, where he had dared to set himself up as the rival of Christ’s Vicar.

The disgrace, as well as the blood of the heresiarch, had fallen on the emperor himself. Curiosity and ill-will but needed, therefore, to be combined, in order to attract personally upon Peter an attention that might prove disastrous. Moreover, be it remembered, there was yet another danger, and to this Saint Paul alludes, namely, the peril of false brethren. To understand this term and justly to appreciate the situation, we must bear in mind how inevitable are the clashings of certain characters in a society so numerous as was already that of the Christians in Rome; and how discontent is necessarily caused to vulgar minds when existing circumstances sometimes demand higher interests to be exclusively consulted, in the always difficult question of choosing persons to offices of trust, or to special confidence.

The filial devotedness of the Christians of Rome took alarm, and they implored Saint Peter to elude the danger for a while, by instant flight. “Although he would have much preferred to suffer,” says Saint Ambrose, Peter set out along the Appian Way. Just as he reached the Capuan gate, Christ suddenly presented himself, seemingly about to enter the city. “Lord, whither goest thou?” cried out the Apostle. “To Rome,” Christ replied, “to be there crucified again.” The disciple understood his Master; he at once retraced his steps, having now no thought but to await his hour of martyrdom.

Feast of the Sacred Heart Today (St. John the Baptist Saturday)

Laudetur Iesus Christus and blessed feast of the Sacred Heart, which occurs the day after the ancient octave of Corpus Christi (yesterday). Tomorrow June 25 will be the feast of the St. John the Baptist (see below).

Feast of the Sacred Heart – Friday June 24

**Today is a solemnity and as such the normal Friday abstinence from meat is lifted – hence you can eat meat today.**

As Dom Gaspar Levebvre OSB writes in the St. Andrew Missal, St. Gertrude, a 13th century Benedictine nun near Eisleben, Germany, received an apparition from St. John the Evangelist who said “the meaning of the blessed beating of the heart of Jesus which he had heard while his rested on His breast was reserved for the latter times when the world grown old and cold in divine love, would require to have its fervor renewed by means of this mystery of burning love”. 

Dom Prosper Gueranger, in The Liturgical Year, notes the providential nature of the appearance to St. Gertrude near her monastery in Eisleben, as if to offer an antidote to the awful heretic that would be born in the same area just 200 years later and whose heresies continue to ravage the world in these “latter times”:

By thus revealing to Gertrude the admirable mysteries of divine love, included in the doctrine which attaches to the Sacred Heart of Jesus, the Holy Spirit was, so to say, forestalling the workings of hell, which, two centuries later on, were to find their prime mover in that same spot. Luther was born at Eisleben, in the year 1483. He was the apostle, after being the inventor, of theories the very opposite of what the Sacred Heart reveals. Instead of the merciful God, as known and loved in the previous ages, Luther would have the world believe him to be the direct author of sin and damnation, who creates the sinner for crime and eternal torments, and for the mere purpose of showing that he could do anything, even injustice! Calvin followed; he took up the blasphemous doctrines of the German apostate, and rivetted the protestant principles by his own gloomy and merciless logic. By these two men, the tail of the dragon dragged the third part of the stars of heaven [Apocalypse 12:4].

Back in the St. Andrew Missal, Levebvre further notes that 400 years later, Divine Providence chose St. Margaret Mary Alacoque as His instrument to request that the feast of the Sacred Heart be instituted on the Friday following the octave of Corpus Christi. It was finally instituted in 1765 by Pope Clement XIII, and then Blessed Pius IX extended it to the entire Church in 1856.  Another aspect of this apparition was Our Lord’s request to St. Margaret Mary that the King of France consecrate his nation to the Sacred Heart, something he and his successors failed to do, and 100 years to the date, the French Revolution began, a rebellion against God which still continues today in various forms.  

Cardinal Burke has just issued a reflection on this feast day which we share here: https://www.cardinalburke.com/presentations/pure-heart-sacred-heart

Nativity of St. John the Baptist – Saturday June 25*

Saturday is the feast of St. John the Baptist, and normally this feast  falls on June 24; however due to the feast of the Sacred Heart occurring on that day this year, the feast of St. John is transferred to June 25. This is confirmed via the FSSP liturgical calendar.

  • 8am – Respect Life Latin Mass, St Ann (followed by prayers at the Planned Parenthood abortion facility, or a Holy of Reparation inside the church)
  • 8:30am: St. John the Baptist, Tryon (2 hours west of Charlotte)

Summer Solstice and St. John the Baptist: This great feast also falls around the summer solstice as the daylight hours begins its decrease until Christmas, symbolizing the gospel of St. John (3:30), as Fisheaters.com notes:

This Feast, then, follows the Feast of the Annunciation by 3 months and precedes the birth of Christ by six months. It is providential that the Feast of “the Forerunner,” the greatest of all Prophets, should fall at Midsummer, around the Summer Solstice when the days become shorter, because of his words in John 3:30, “He must increase, but I must decrease.” It is the longest day of the year, and from here on out, the days grow shorter and shorter. Conversely, Our Lord, the “Radiant Dawn,” was born at the Winter Solstice, when the days were becoming longer!

https://www.fisheaters.com/customstimeafterpentecost3.html

We close this update with an excellent summary on Saturday’s feast day from the weekly update of our friends with the Latin Mass community in Greensboro:

Midsummer is the traditional mid-point of the agricultural season between planting and harvest. Some of us are a little behind that schedule but no matter. It also coincides with the Nativity of Saint John the Baptist (this year transferred to Thursday or Saturday, depending on your calendar, bumped by the Feast of the Sacred Heart on Friday), six months prior to the Nativity of Our Lord. Saint John’s nativity was considered of particular note because it was the firm belief in the ancient Church that John was freed from original sin at the Visitation; and as he was “filled with the Holy Spirit even from his mother’s womb” (Luke 1:15) he was born without original sin. The Council of Agde in 506 A.D. listed the Nativity of Saint John among the highest feasts of the year, a day on which all the faithful had to attend Mass and abstain from servile work. In European tradition “Saint John’s fires” are lit on the eve of his feast from mountaintops and hilltops, and even from the top of the mainsail yard of fishing vessels; or smaller fires (fogatas in Spain) over which children leap. People gather around the fire, sing their ancient songs, pray to St John for his intercession and that the summer may be blessed in homes, fields, and country, followed by folk dances. These and other traddy tidbits may be found in the Handbook of Christian Feasts and Customs by Fr Franz Weiser, reprinted in three volumes by St Augustine Academy Press.

Synod Meeting Follow-Up

Laudetur Iesus Christus!  I hope you all have enjoyed the pleasant weather this weekend with your families along with the proximate celebrations of the Feast of Corpus Christi, ordinations, and the secular observance of Father’s Day, honoring our fathers, most especially our priests who are our spiritual fathers. 

We have received a few inquiries wanting feedback about the Diocesan Synod meeting last week.  Attached is our full synod response (see below).  In addition, I will do my best to represent the day as fair as I can, but in short, the synod meeting was not good.  While we did not have much hope in the synod process at the Vatican level, our hope was that we would finally get to voice our spiritual needs to Bishop Jugis and some real fruit would emerge.  Unfortunately, this did not happen.

Our Bishop was present at the entire meeting, and he was subjected to a barrage of neo-Marxist and anti-Catholic masonic voices.  Some of the speakers at the event were so unhinged, it seemed as though they were reading from the Unabomber Manifesto.  As an example, our Bishop was accused of somehow being complicit in racism, which obligated him to support reparation payments for slavery and universal healthcare.  Additionally, that Bishop Jugis should allow those engaging in homosexual and transgendered lifestyles to be ordained to the priesthood and to have full decision-making roles in the Church.  It was shameful that the chancery allowed him to be subjected to such abuse.

The format of the Synod meeting was highly managed, giving organizers the ability to amplify certain voices and to suppress others.  It seemed that His Excellency came away from that meeting with a sharply skewed anti-Catholic perspective of the “spiritual needs” of his flock.  The inclusive and affirming language was laid down pretty thick.  I lost count of all the times I heard the words “accompany” and “equity” that we needed to “let ourselves be touched” (eww).  The term “unity” was used in regard to the coexistence of error alongside truth.  It was head spinning.  The language presented to Bishop Jugis that day reminded me of the Annibale Bugnini quote featured in the Second Episode of the Mass of Ages documentary, “… we must tread carefully and discretely.  Proposals must be formulated in such a way that much is said without seeming to say anything.   Let many things be said in embryo, and in this way, let the door remain open to post-conciliar deductions and applications.”

When organizers shared the format of the meeting, the potential for deceptive manipulation was immediately apparent.  At the Synod meeting there were roughly 10 tables, each with about 6 to 8 people.  Each of the people at the tables represented a different group (lay associations, diocesan ministries, and select parishes).  The table seating was strictly assigned, and reminders were given that switching tables was not allowed.  Also, at each table there was one person pre-designated to be a table moderator.  With this format, and these controls in place, organizers had full control of the discussion.

The daylong meeting would address the three synod questions in turn at each table with each representative taking turns to give an answer to each question with the table moderator taking notes.  Once everyone at the table was finished discussing the first question, the table moderators at each table would in turn stand up and “share the fruits of the discussion” with Bishop Jugis who was seated at a table at the front of the room.  After all the table moderators had shared their comments regarding the first question, the discussions would then proceed to the same format for questions two and three, respectively.

The deceptive manipulation of the overall synodal message was subtle but distinct.  Several of the table moderators when they rose to speak, they didn’t speak as if they were relaying varied opinions from the table in a dispassionate way, but rather they stood and gave what seemed to be a prepared speech advocating modernist ideology.  One moderator started by saying that her table had “several differences of opinion”, but then proceeded to give a one-sided hardcore modernist speech without any signs of division at all.  

There were some table moderators that tried to articulate a neo-conservative Catholic point of view, but these moderators felt a false duty to represent all sides, an ethic not shared by their modernist counterparts.  The resulting tug-of-war between modernism and the neo-conservative Catholic viewpoints was void of any discussion of traditional Church teaching.  They had no understanding that error does not have any right in the Church.  If a group feels a spiritual need towards sinful behavior or abandonment of the traditional doctrines of the Church, these are not spiritual needs.  Maybe they are demonic influences, but whatever they are, they do not have any right to be presented alongside the unchangeable doctrines of the Church.  Those poisonous voices should have been expelled from the meeting.

Let us call to mind the prophetic words of Pope Saint Pius X in his Encyclical Pascendi Dominici Gregis:  

“We allude, Venerable Brethren, to many who belong to the Catholic laity, nay, and this is far more lamentable, to the ranks of the priesthood itself, who, feigning a love for the Church, lacking the firm protection of philosophy and theology, nay more, thoroughly imbued with the poisonous doctrines taught by the enemies of the Church, and lost to all sense of modesty, vaunt themselves as reformers of the Church; and, forming more boldly into line of attack, assail all that is most sacred in the work of Christ, not sparing even the person of the Divine Redeemer, whom, with sacrilegious daring, they reduce to a simple, mere man.”

When the moderator at our table stood to summarize our table’s responses, our CLMC answers were watered down to the point of being meaningless.  For example, during one session, I shared directly from our CLMC synod respondents, frustration that we have written roughly a dozen letters to Bishop Jugis without any replies and that during chance meetings with the Bishop it appeared that he hadn’t seen our letters, leaving us with the feeling that someone at the Diocesan level is blocking our communications.   During our table moderator’s presentation to Bishop Jugis, the moderator reduced our frustration to a more benign, “lack of communication” in the diocesan office.

One additional frustration, within our table discussion, our well-meaning table moderator replied to me directly, saying that personal relationships really do matter when communicating with the diocese.  To which I replied that this is exactly the problem.  The feeling is that some in the chancery play favorites.  When it comes to a Community of more than 1,000 families writing to express legitimate spiritual needs, personal relationships should not matter at all.  These families have a duty to express their spiritual needs to their Bishop, and these families have a right to a clear response.

While it was difficult to sit through the entire meeting, there was one glimmer of hope.  During a break, I was able to have a brief conversation with Bishop Jugis.  I shared with His Excellency that while our full CLMC synod response was making its way through the process, there was one synod response that received overwhelming support — and further that it was time sensitive relating to the upcoming Eucharistic Congress.  He asked me to explain further.  I explained that our Community has a significant number of people who follow the First Saturday Devotion and this year the Eucharistic Congress falls on a First Saturday (August 6th).  This will cause our First Saturday Latin Mass to be cancelled at St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic Church in Charlotte.  He was genuinely concerned and to my surprise he added that it would also disrupt the First Saturday Latin Masses at St. Elizabeth in Boone and St. John the Baptist in Tryon (it is amazing that he knew that off the top of his head).  

I implored that our Community is requesting that His Excellency assign one of the many priests at the Congress to provide our Community a Latin Mass on the Saturday of the Eucharistic Congress in one of the empty rooms of the Convention Center at a time of his choosing.  I offered that our Community would be happy to cover any added costs or manage any needed logistics.  I prepared a printed letter which outlined this request and with His Excellency’s permission, I presented this letter to him.  He accepted it and committed that he would forward the matter to Father Arnsparger who manages the Eucharistic Congress.  He did not commit to an answer, however, I do believe he will come to our aid in this matter.  Stay tuned.

Please pray for our Bishop that he will be strengthened in fortitude against the poisonous doctrines taught by the enemies of the Church.

Blessed be His Holy Name,

Chris Lauer
Charlotte Latin Mass Community

Second Sunday After Pentecost

Laudetur Iesus Christus and happy Father’s Day! Sunday is the second Sunday after Pentecost and depending on parish, it may also be the external solemnity of Corpus Christi. As custom we provide a commentary on the propers for this Sunday’s Mass: https://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2022/06/heavenly-life-on-earth-secret-of-second.html#.Yq6VoezMKHt

June Festal Latin Masses

Feast of the Sacred Heart – Friday June 24

Nativity of St. John the Baptist – Saturday June 25*

  • 8am – Respect Life Latin Mass, St Ann
  • 8:30am: St. John the Baptist, Tryon (2 hours west of Charlotte)

* The feast of St. John the Baptist normally falls on June 24; however due to the feast of the Sacred Heart occurring on that day this year, the feast of St. John is transferred to June 25. This is confirmed via the FSSP liturgical calendar.

To learn why the feast of St. John the Baptist is transferred to June 25, please see Greg DiPippo’s article on New Liturgical Movement: https://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2022/06/some-rubrical-notes-for-coming-days.html#.YqwTIOzMKHs

Feast of SS. Peter and Paul – Wednesday June 29

  • 6pm: St. Ann

Latin Mass Community News

  • Holy Face Devotions: Three parishes in Charlotte now offer the Holy Face devotions – a timely and powerful devotion to combat communism (among which abortion is its “anti-sacrament”). As background, in 1843, Sr. Mary of St. Peter, a Carmelite nun in the monastery in Tours, France, received a series of revelations from Jesus telling her that reparation for certain sins were an imperative, and that it was to be done through devotion to the Holy Face.  The primary purpose of this apostolate is to, by praying certain prayers, make reparation for the sins committed against the first three Commandments of the Lord: The denial of God by atheism (communism), blasphemy, and the profanation of Sundays and Holy Days. Devotion to the Holy Face has been referred to as the devotion for Jesus Crucified.  The schedule is as follows:
  • St. Mark – Mondays 2-3pm
  • St. Thomas Aquinas – Tuesdays 6am in the main church
  • St. Ann – Tuesdays 7:30am in the chapel after the Novus Ordo Mass (uses the booklet which takes 15-20 minutes)

Latin Mass & Traditional News

The Problem of ‘Restorationists’

Last week was a busy week in the Vatican regarding the liturgy. On Wednesday, the Holy See published a decree prohibiting a bishop from establishing new religious orders without Rome’s permission – a decision clearly targeting dioceses which may try to establish new Latin Mass religious orders (FYI – inviting in already existing religious orders is still allowed).  This was followed on Thursday by the Holy See’s new head of the Dicastery for Divine Worship, Archbishop Roche, who in a published interview justified the regulation of the Traditional Latin Mass under Traditiones Custodes, because the Vatican II Council was “putting forward a new liturgy”.

However, the most interesting news item from Rome last week was an interview between Pope Francis and editors with several Jesuit journals in Europe. In this exchange, His Holiness expressed the following concerns about “restorationists”:

“It is very difficult to see spiritual renewal using old-fashioned criteria. We need to renew our way of seeing reality, of evaluating it. In the European Church I see more renewal in the spontaneous things that are emerging: movements, groups, new bishops who remember that there is a Council behind them. Because the Council that some pastors remember best is that of Trent. What I’m saying is not nonsense.

Restorationism has come to gag the Council. The number of groups of “restorers” – for example, in the United States there are many – is significant. An Argentine bishop told me that he had been asked to administer a diocese that had fallen into the hands of these “restorers.” They had never accepted the Council. There are ideas, behaviors that arise from a restorationism that basically did not accept the Council. The problem is precisely this: in some contexts the Council has not yet been accepted. It is also true that it takes a century for a Council to take root. We still have forty years to make it take root, then!”

CLMC Comment:

We welcome His Holiness’ comments on a distinct point. Indeed there are many problematic “restorers” in the U.S., who seem to be wedded to the “old fashioned criteria” for “spiritual renewal”.

These groups are called the “1960s restorationists” who cling to the halcyon days of guitars, tambourines, felt banners, polyester vestments, watered down doctrine, dissent, and folk songs in the liturgy – and just can’t let it go. (Moreover, the spiritual children of these “restorers” – some who populate the pews of many Novus Ordo Masses – are actually the ones who deny the validity of the Vatican II Mass – particularly when they deny belief in the Real Presence in the Eucharist offered at Mass, as Phil Lawler noted in an article last December.) These so-called “1960s restorationists” and their often heavy handed behaviors are often a source of strife and division (as seen at the Charlotte Synod last week!). This may in part be why, as early as 1980, Pope John Paul II had to issue an apology for the actions of these “bitter clingers” who even then didn’t realize their retro-party was already ending:

“I would like to ask forgiveness-in my own name and in the name of all of you, venerable and dear brothers in the episcopate-for everything which, for whatever reason, through whatever human weakness, impatience or negligence, and also through the at times partial, one-sided and erroneous application of the directives of the Second Vatican Council, may have caused scandal and disturbance concerning the interpretation of the doctrine and the veneration due to this great sacrament. And I pray the Lord Jesus that in the future we may avoid in our manner of dealing with this sacred mystery anything which could weaken or disorient in any way the sense of reverence and love that exists in our faithful people.” – John Paul II, Dominicae Cenae #12, February 24, 1980

If those in Rome are truly concerned about overcoming opposition to the actual truths (aligned with tradition) contained in the Vatican II Council texts, then the words of Deacon Nick Donnelly (of the U.K.), may be a wakeup call:

“Traditional Catholics uphold the importance Latin and Gregorian Chant to the worship of God (Sacrosanctum Concilium 36 & 116); we teach the truth that there is no salvation outside the Catholic Church (Lumen Gentium 14); we warn that atheism is an evil that must be rejected ‘root and branch’ (Gaudeum et spes 21), we defend the sacrament of marriage from the plague of divorce and cohabitation (Gaudeum et spes 47).”

If Church leaders truly wish to overcome these problematic “1960s restorationists”, they should consider embracing not the Mass of Vatican II, but the Mass at Vatican II – The Traditional Latin Mass, the Mass of Ages. From this Mass are where the emerging movements, groups, and even new bishops are sprouting up all over the Church in tiny but growing pockets.

In closing we share Pope St. Pius X’s comment in Notre Charge Apostolique (1910): Indeed, the true friends of the people are neither revolutionaries, nor innovators: they are traditionalists.

What Mass are you attending Sunday?

Feast of Corpus Christi

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Today, the Thursday after Trinity Sunday, is the traditional day for the feast of Corpus Christi. In earlier decades, the feast took on such importance it retained its own octave which concluded on the feast of the Sacred Heart. For today’s feast, we are fortunate to have a few Latin Masses in the area tonight:

Feast of Corpus Christi – Thursday June 16

  • 6pm (High Mass): St. Ann parish (changed to High Mass)
  • 7pm (High): St. Thomas Aquinas, with Eucharistic Procession to follow
  • 7pm (Solemn High Mass): Prince of Peace parish, Taylors, SC (2 hours southwest of Charlotte). Eucharistic Procession to follow.

Why We Should Restore the Corpus Christi Octave

As we noted above, in earlier ages, the feast of Corpus Christi used to have its own octave, or 8 days of celebration. Dr. Peter Kwasniewski published an article last year arguing that this octave should be restored to the Traditional Latin Mass:

https://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/05/why-we-should-revive-octave-of-corpus.html 

Dom Prosper Gueranger on the Feast of Corpus Christi

We close with an excerpt from Gueranger’s entry from The Liturgical Year:

All the mysteries we have celebrated up to this time were contained in the august Sacrament, which is the memorial and, so to say, the compendium of the wonderful things wrought in our favor by our Redeemer. It was the reality of Christ’s presence under the sacramental species that enabled us to recognize, in the sacred Host, at Christmas, the Child that was born unto us, in Passiontide the Victim who redeemed us and at Easter the glorious conqueror of death. We could not celebrate all those admirable Mysteries without the aid of the perpetual Sacrifice; neither could that sacrifice be offered up, without its renewing and repeating them.

Putting together all the means within our reach for honoring these blessed citizens of the heavenly court, we have chanted the grand Psalms of David, and hymns, and canticles, with all the varied formulas of the Liturgy;—but nothing that we could do towards celebrating their praise could be compared to the holy Sacrifice offered to the divine Majesty. It is in that Sacrifice that we entered into direct communication with them, according to the energetic term used by the Church in the Canon of the Mass (communicantes).

There is a sacred element which gives a meaning to every feast that occurs during the Year, and graces it with the beauty of its own divine splendor;—that sacred element is the most holy Eucharist, and itself had a right to a solemn festival in keeping with the dignity of its divine object.

Trinity Sunday

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Sunday is the ancient octave day of Pentecost, otherwise known as the feast of the Most Holy Trinity, the beginning of the season after Pentecost.  According to Dom Prosper Lefebvre, OSB, in the St. Andrew Daily Missal, the reign of the Holy Ghost begins in this season after Pentecost, giving the faithful roughly six months of sanctoral feasts (e.g. the saints) to help deepen one’s faith and in love of God. The feasts of the Holy Trinity (today), Corpus Christi (this Thursday June 16), the Sacred Heart (June 24), followed by Ss. Peter & Paul (June 29) help to emphasize this aspect of the calendar. As custom, we share commentary on Sunday’s collect: https://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/05/the-confessional-collect-of-trinity.html

Additionally, Dr. Mike Foley provides a rare look into the collect of the first Sunday after Pentecost, which would be today if it were not replaced by the feast of the Holy Trinity centuries ago: https://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2022/06/the-rare-collect-of-first-sunday-after.html#.YqQYnOzMKHs

June Festal Latin Masses (Feast of Corpus Christi this Thursday)

As the Church moves into the season after Pentecost, June has some important feast days to celebrate:

Feast of Corpus Christi – Thursday June 16*

  • 6pm (Solemn High Mass): St. Ann parish
  • 7pm (High): St. Thomas Aquinas, with Eucharistic Procession to follow
  • 7pm (Solemn High Mass): Prince of Peace parish, Taylors, SC (2 hours southwest of Charlotte)

* The traditional calendar commemorates Corpus Christi on the Thursday after Trinity Sunday.

Feast of the Sacred Heart – Friday June 24

Nativity of St. John the Baptist – Saturday June 25*

  • 8am – Respect Life Latin Mass, St Ann
  • 9am – Prince of Peace parish, Taylors, SC (2 hours southwest of Charlotte)

* The feast of St. John the Baptist normally falls on June 24; however due to the feast of the Sacred Heart occurring on that day this year, the Nativity of St. John is transferred to June 25. This is confirmed via the FSSP liturgical calendar.

Feast of SS. Peter and Paul – Wednesday June 29

  • 6pm: St. Ann

June – The Month of Octaves

June can also be thought of as a month of ancient octaves. Prior to Archbishop Bugnini’s liturgical “reforms” of 1955, the Church celebrated many more octaves than today. In fact, June would not only have the octave of Pentecost (if Easter/Ascension occurred late enough), but also commemorated octaves of Corpus Christi, Sacred Heart, and of Ss. Peter and Paul – each for 8 days. Occasionally, this also would mean a saint’s feast day was placed on the calendar only after a certain octave concluded, such as St. Isabel of Portugal who died on July 4 (during the Octave of Ss. Peter & Paul); thus her feast day was fixed to July 8. The same occurred with St. Thomas More, who was martyred on July 6 (octave day of Ss. Peter and Paul), but is celebrated in the Traditional Rite on July 9.  As the Church rediscovers the Traditional Latin Mass, especially the calendar prior to 1955, we can pray for a return to more of these octaves, as some feasts are too glorious to be celebrated for just one day.

Prayers for the Seminarians: Please pray for the two Charlotte deacons set to be ordained this coming week, Deacons Aaron Huber and Darren Balkey.

Community News

  • Temporary Latin Mass Changes in Taylors, SC: Due to clergy summer retreats, sabbaticals, etc., Prince of Peace parish in Taylors, SC (2 hours southwest of Charlotte) will not be offering Latin Mass on weekdays during the summer. It will have 1st Saturdays at 9am and the regular 12 noon Latin Mass each Sunday. The normal schedule should resume by mid-August. Please visit the website before making a visit: https://princeofpeacetaylors.org/

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • Modesty Announcement at St. Ann:  Last year around this time, Fr. Reid issued a gentle reminder about the importance of dressing modesty at St. Ann parish (see bulletin here).  With summer here please note the sign in the narthex denoting the parish’s modesty reminder. We encourage all to read Fr. Reid’s message:

    As our weather begins to warm up, please be attentive to dressing modestly for Mass. Attending Mass is the most important thing we do each week, and the way we dress should reflect this. When we come to Mass, we are coming to visit our Lord, and thus we should be dressed appropriately. Thus, as your pastor I respectfully ask you to refrain from wearing shorts, t-shirts, short skirts, low-cut or revealing clothing at Mass. Moreover, clothing that is revealing or very tightly fitting can be a distraction to your fellow parishioners. So out of respect to our Lord, and in charity to your fellow parishioners, please be modest when selecting your clothes for Mass. I appreciate your attention to this important matter.
  • Restoration, Not Reform, Is The Only Way Forward: Dr. Peter Kwasniewski (who visited the CLMC and St. Thomas Aquinas parish last year) posts a letter he wrote to a priest in which he advocates that clergy should abandon the “Reform of the Reform” (e.g. trying to make the Novus Ordo Mass more traditional) and instead just replace it with the Traditional Latin Mass. Dr. K says succinctly (emphasis ours):

“There is no future for a liturgy that has severed its ties to the past, its bond to the Faith of every generation, unfolding across the ages…[T]he modern lex orandi is defective in its texts, rubrics, and ceremonies; it fails to embody adequately and communicate clearly the full lex credendi of the Catholic Church. This is an objective wound in the Body of Christ and cannot be papered over with charitable intentions or surreptitious improvements…It is worth pointing out that the journal Notitiae, which has provided official guidelines for the Novus Ordo for decades now, stated repeatedly that elements from the old missal were never meant to be incorporated into the new, and that the celebrant should not do so.

https://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2022/06/restoration-not-reform-is-only-way.html#.YqV7lOzMKHt

CLMC comment: Is it not long overdue for conservative priests and seminarians to abandon the sinking Reform of the Reform ship, and fully embrace the Mass of Ages?

  • Are US dioceses ‘in a corner’ over Traditionis custodes?: With the Synod in Charlotte completed, we share an article about how some US Bishops may have boxed themselves into a corner as they desire to follow Pope Francis’ Motu Proprio Traditiones Custodes which restricts the Latin Mass, and yet desire to follow Pope Francis’ call to listen to the laity’s needs during the Synod – including the Latin Mass faithful who are being harmed by the restrictions: https://www.pillarcatholic.com/p/are-us-dioceses-in-a-corner-over?s=w

CLMC comment: We reshare our Synod response here: https://charlottelatinmass.org/about/clmc-synod/

Trinity Sunday Reflection – Dom Prosper Gueranger, OSB

After the Ascension, and Pentecost, the importance of today’s feast day is often overlooked but the great liturgist Dom Prosper Gueranger, in The Liturgical Year, gives some excellent reasons on why the feast of the Most Holy Trinity is quite foundational for the Church and her faithful. We provide an excerpt and a link to read further:

“Every homage paid to God by the Church’s Liturgy has the Holy Trinity as its object. Time, as well as eternity, belongs to the Trinity. The Trinity is the scope of all Religion. Every day, every hour, belongs to It. The Feasts instituted in memory of the mysteries of our Redemption center in It. The Feasts of the Blessed Virgin and the Saints are but so many means for leading us to the praise of the God who is One in essence, and Three in Persons. The Sunday’s Office, in a very special way, gives us, each week, a most explicit expression of adoration and worship of this mystery, which is the foundation of all others and the source of all grace.

On the day of Pentecost, the Holy Apostles received, as we have seen, the grace of the Holy Ghost. In accordance with the injunction of their divine Master, they will soon start on their mission of teaching all nations and baptizing men in the name of the Holy Trinity It was but right, then, that the solemnity which is intended to honor the mystery of One God in Three Persons should immediately follow that of Pentecost, with which it has a mysterious connection. And yet it was not till after many centuries that it was inserted in the Cycle of the Liturgical Year, whose completion is the work of successive ages.

This explains to us how it was that the Church was so long in instituting a special Feast in honor of the Holy Trinity. The ordinary motive for the institution of Feasts did not exist in this instance. A Feast is the memorial of some fact which took place at some certain time, and of which it is well to perpetuate the remembrance and influence. How could this be applied to the mystery of the Trinity? It was from all eternity, it was before any created being existed, that God liveth and reigneth, Father, Son, and Holy Ghost. If a Feast in honor of that Mystery were to be instituted, it could only be by the fixing some one day in the Year whereon the Faithful would assemble for the offering a more than usually solemn tribute of worship to the Mystery of Unity and Trinity in the one same divine Nature.”

Trinity Sunday: https://sensusfidelium.com/the-liturgical-year-dom-prosper-gueranger/the-time-after-pentecost/trinity-sunday/

What Mass are you attending Sunday?

Whit Embertide

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Greetings on this fourth day in the Octave of Pentecost and during the Whit Embertide week. 

As our readers may recall, the Ember Days are the 3 penitential days in the 1962 calendar, occurring at the beginning of each season, that offer thanksgiving for God’s gift of creation, and prayers for holiness in the upcoming season.  Incidentally, the traditional Latin Mass calendar actually has many feasts and customs devoted to the land, agriculture and creation which are worth exploring further sometime.

This week are the Whit Ember Days for the summer season which follows Pentecost and occurs on the following dates below.  Though the below fasting/partial abstinence days are now voluntary, with all the sin occurring in the world (and in the Church), it may be worth participating in the traditional fasts if you have not done so before.

  • Whit Ember Wednesday – Wednesday June 8 (fasting, partial abstinence), St. Ann, 6pm Low Mass
  • Whit Ember Friday – Friday June 10 (fasting and since its Friday, complete abstinence from meat), St. Ann, 7am Low Mass; St. Mark 12:30pm Low Mass
  • Whit Ember Saturday – Saturday June 11 (fasting, partial abstinence), no diocesan Latin Masses in Charlotte scheduled

The “Whit Ember” days are named after Whit Sunday (“white”), which was an ancient name for Pentecost Sunday and the robes worn by catechumens that day. To learn more about the Whit Ember days visit: https://www.fisheaters.com/customseastertide8.html

If you do consider fasting & partial abstinence for the Ember Days, please consider offering it up for our priests, bishop, a restoration of the Latin Mass, and that the diocese will be open to the needs of the Latin Mass faithful this weekend at the final diocesan Synod.

Pentecost Sunday

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Sunday is Pentecost, also known as Whitsunday (for the Easter catechumens who would again wear white at Mass). Liturgist Dom Gasper Lefebvre OSB in the St. Andrew Missal, Pentecost is the second most important feast day in the Church’s liturgical year (next to Easter), was also called “Red Easter” and has its own Octave to commemorate the foundation of the Church.  Lefebrve notes that the descent of the Holy Spirit upon the apostles occurred at nine in the morning, and by Divine Providence, occurred on the same day as the Jewish feast of Pentecost, which, established around 1,600 years prior, commemorated the promulgation of the Law on Mount Sinai. In Jerusalem on this day in 33 A.D., many Jewish pilgrims were in the city to mark the feast day, and witnessed the new Pentecost and the coming of the Holy Ghost. 

There is much that can be shared on this solemn feast day, and we include but a few:

Diocesan Pentecost Masses

In addition to St. Ann parish’s 12:30pm Latin Mass for today (where newly ordained Deacon Peter Rusciolelli will preach), St. Thomas Aquinas offers its 11:30am Latin Mass (with a potluck afterwards to mark Fr. Codd’s 10th anniversary as a priest, and Deacon Chinoso’s ordination to the diaconate yesterday – Deacon Chinoso will also preach). Additionally there will be a First Sunday 4pm Latin Mass at Sacred Heart in Salisbury. http://salisburylmc.org/

Plenary Indulgence for Pentecost

There is a plenary indulgence today, Pentecost Sunday, to all who pray the Veni Creator – ‘Come Holy Spirit’ under the usual conditions. This will normally be prayed during the Sunday Latin Mass.

Whit Ember Days (This Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday)

As our readers may recall, the Ember Days are the 3 penitential days in the 1962 calendar, occurring at the beginning of each season, that offer thanksgiving and prayers for holiness in the upcoming season.  This week is the Whit Ember Days for the summer season and occurs on the following dates below.  Though the below fasting/partial abstinence days are now voluntary, with all the sin occurring in the world (and in the Church), it may be worth participating in the traditional fasts if you have not done so before.

•           Whit Ember Wednesday – Wednesday June 8 (fasting, partial abstinence), St. Ann, 6pm Low Mass

•           Whit Ember Friday – Friday June 10 (fasting and since its Friday, complete abstinence from meat), St. Ann, 7am Low Mass; St. Mark 12:30pm Low Mass

•           Whit Ember Saturday – Saturday June 11 (fasting, partial abstinence), no diocesan Latin Masses in Charlotte scheduled

The “Whit Ember” days are named after Whit Sunday (“white”), which was an ancient name for Pentecost Sunday and the robes worn by catechumens that day. To learn more about the Whit Ember days visit: https://www.fisheaters.com/customseastertide8.html

Community News

  • Temporary Latin Mass Changes in Taylors, SC: Due to clergy retreats, sabbaticals, etc., Prince of Peace parish in Taylors, SC (2 hours southwest of Charlotte) will not be offering Latin Mass on weekdays during the summer. It will have 1st Saturdays at 9am and the regular 12 noon Latin Mass each Sunday. The normal schedule should resume by mid-August. Please visit the website before making a visit: https://princeofpeacetaylors.org/

Latin Mass & Traditional News

Mass of Ages Part II – The Perfect Storm: On Ascension Thursday, the latest Mass of Ages documentary premiered.  This exceptional documentary examines the question “What went wrong after Vatican II?” and looks into the role of Archbishop Annibale Bugnini, and the role of the Concilium, which was the committee that dismantled the Traditional Latin Mass and designed the Novus Ordo.  To watch either episode please visit: https://latinmass.com/watch  (The CLMC also has it posted on our webpage: https://charlottelatinmass.org/mass-of-ages-documentary/)

The Springtime That Never Came & Evangelization w/ Bishop Schneider: Steve Cunningham with Sensus Fidelium interviewed Bishop Athanasius Schneider (who visited St. Ann and the CLMC in 2017) about his new book, The Springtime that Never Came, which discusses the false claim that Vatican II and its Mass ushered in a new “Springtime” in the Church. His Excellency examines how modernist church leaders are denying reality in believing that this springtime has arrived: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3CEbdZYuOxU

Divine Do-Overs: The Secret of Recapitulation in the Traditional Calendar: In this instructive essay, Dr. Mike Foley examines why the Church repeats certain themes, readings, or saints in the Traditional Latin Mass at various times of year. For instance the Kingship of Christ is emphasized on Palm Sunday and later in the year during the feast of Christ the King, likewise the Holy Eucharist is emphasized on Holy Thursday, but also on the feast of Corpus Christi. There are certain themes that are important and are made more explicit in the Church as the liturgical year progresses: https://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2022/06/divine-do-overs-secret-of.html#.YpwYyezMKHs

Pope Francis names Cardinal Cupich a member of Vatican Congregation for Divine Worship: Last week the Holy Father appointed two bishops to the Vatican department which oversees the liturgy. Unsurprisingly he appointed, among others, Cardinal Cupich of Chicago, and Cardinal Kevin Farrell, formerly of Dallas and Washington DC, but now serves as the prefect of the Dicastery for the Laity, the Family, and Life in Rome. Both are, as one may presume, progressive and modernist in their theological and liturgical outlook. https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/251425/cardinal-cupich-among-new-members-of-vatican-congregation-for-divine-worship

CLMC Comment: We share this article, however, to highlight a critical distinction that is often overlooked by some faithful Catholics – including some Latin Mass faithful (e.g. traditonalists) – that conservative bishops are the “good guys”, and liberal bishops are the “bad guys”.  This Americanized perspective on ecclesiastical politics is, however, simplistic and misleading. The truth is more nuanced. For the record, it should be noted that while restrictions and cancellations were placed on Latin Mass faithful in “conservative” dioceses such as Arlington, and other places, the Latin Mass faithful in Chicago were able to attend a Latin Triduum this year and has a dedicated Latin Mass parish, which, for years offers the Latin Mass daily, along with other sacraments.

In Dallas, it was Cardinal Farrell, who as bishop in 2010, established a dedicated Latin Mass parish, which now offers the Latin Mass twice daily, and FIVE times on Sunday. Accounts like these are not isolated instances. That said, the CLMC is under no illusion that members of the Congregation of Divine Worship are Latin Mass supporters, or would agree with traditionalists on any number of topics. We simply advise: Do not place your trust in conservative clergy or bishops. Our Friend (and hope) is simply with Our Lord Jesus Christ, along with His Blessed Mother, and the saints.

Suffering Latin Mass Families Needed: On the topic of dioceses and bishops, Preserve the Latin Mass, founded to help defend the Latin Mass – and promoted from the pulpit and bulletins at St. Ann parish – is putting out a new video series entitled Suffering Faithful Video Series, which according to a recent statement, “will shine a light on all of the suffering being caused by bishops who implement Traditionis Custodes [TC] in their Diocese.  The series will show that the cost of implementing Traditionis Custodes is too great.  The cancelation/restriction of the Latin Mass and accompanying Sacraments causes spiritual pain, loss, distrust, division, and the alienation of the faithful from their bishops. We need the faithful who are suffering under TC to create and send video testimonials  The video testimonials will be professionally edited and prepared for distribution by our video production team.”

The goal is to encourage bishops to reverse their TC implementations. The Suffering Faithful video testimonial submissions should include the following:

  • Please provide 3-10 minutes of clear (video and audio) testimonial from an individual or family
  • Please share how you discovered the Latin Mass and how the Latin Mass has affected your life.
  • Please share the circumstances around the implementation of Traditionis Custodes in your Diocese.  Please name your bishop.
  • Please share how the cancellation/restriction of the Latin Mass and accompanying Sacraments has caused you, your family, and your community to experience suffering.
  • Please consider including a heartful plea for your bishop to restore the Latin Mass and accompanying sacraments.
  • To upload a video visit this website: https://app.videopeel.com/c/xqdbbpgm
  • Questions or to submit a testimonial, contact: info(at)preservethelatinmass.org

CLMC comment: Roll camera?

The Great Vigil of Pentecost (Pre-1955)

While Pentecost is a solemn feast day, the day preceding it also worthy to note – the Vigil of Pentecost. Before 1955, this vigil day featured one of the most beautiful liturgies in the Church. It served as a “bookend” to the Eastertide season and this Mass was much a mirror of the Easter Vigil Mass in many ways. The nearly three-hour Mass began with folded chasubles, penitential vestments, a reading of six Old Testament prophecies (instead of 12 at the Easter Vigil), blessing of the Holy Water font, and baptisms (if there were catechumens). To learn more see our entry from Pentecost 2020: https://charlottelatinmass.org/2020/05/30/vigil-of-pentecost-update-2/

Sadly one of the practical challenges of having Traditional Latin Masses in Novus Ordo parishes (the current framework in the Charlotte diocese) is that certain vigils such as the Vigil of Pentecost, or even the hauntingly sublime Mass of All Hallows Eve (October 31) often cannot be offered in the afternoons or evenings due to the Novus Ordo “anticipatory Mass” that occurs the evening before holydays or Sundays. Another challenge is the limited familiarity and public recitation of the traditional 1962 breviary (Matins, Lauds, Vespers, etc.) that accompanies the Traditional Latin Mass and is different than the Novus Ordo’s Liturgy of the Hours. That is perhaps a topic to cover another time. However, we close this section with Dom Prosper Gueranger’s comments on the Vigil of Pentecost:

The dazzling splendor of tomorrow’s Solemnity forecasts its beauty on this day of its Vigil. The Faithful are preparing themselves by Fasting to celebrate the glorious mystery. But the Mass of the Neophytes, which, formerly, was said during the Night, is now anticipated, as on Easter Eve; so that by today’s Noon, we shall have already begun the praises of the Holy Ghost. The Office of Vespers, in the afternoon, will solemnly open the grand Festival.

Formerly, this vigil was kept like that of Easter. The faithful repaired to the church in the evening, that they might assist at the solemn administration of Baptism. During the night, the Sacrament of regeneration was conferred upon such catechumens as sickness or absence from home had prevented from receiving it on Easter night. Those, also, who had then been thought insufficiently tried or instructed, and had, during the interval, satisfied the conditions required by the Church, now formed part of the group of aspirants to the new birth of the sacred font. Instead of the twelve prophecies, which were read on Easter night while the priests were performing over the catechumens the rites preparatory to Baptism, six only were now read; at least, such was the usual custom, and it would lead us to suppose that the number of those baptized at Pentecost was less than at Easter.

The Paschal Candle was again brought forward during this night of grace, in order to impress the newly baptized with respect and love for the Son of God, who became Man that He might be the light of the world.[14] The rites already described and explained for Holy Saturday were repeated on this occasion, and the Sacrifice of the Mass, at which the neophytes assisted, began before the break of day.

Dom Prosper Gueranger – Vigil of Pentecost: https://sensusfidelium.com/the-liturgical-year-dom-prosper-gueranger/easter/saturday-the-vigil-of-pentecost/

Only the Traditional Latin Mass prepares for the solemn feast of Pentecost with a special vigil day. What Mass are you attending Pentecost Sunday?

Ascension Octave Update

Dear friends of the Charlotte Latin Mass Community (CLMC),

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Today is the octave of the Ascension and we have several updates heading into this weekend.

CLMC on Catholic Radio Today Friday at 5pm: The CLMC’s Chris Lauer will be on the Obligation Show with Jason Murphy to discuss the Synod, the CLMC’s Synod response, and the future of the Latin Mass. It will premier at 5pm on the Carolina Catholic Media network. It will be on 1270AM or online at: https://listen.streamon.fm/wcgcam (we will share the podcast when it is made available).

CANCELLED: Saturday June 4  – First Saturday Latin Mass at St. Thomas Aquinas

Regretfully, the first Saturday Latin Mass at St. Thomas Aquinas parish is canceled for this Saturday only. Father will be attending the diaconate ordinations of one of his parishioners, seminarian Chinonso A. Nnebe-Agumadu, and the backup Latin Mass priest is unavailable. There are other first Saturday diocesan Latin Masses in the region:

1st Sunday Latin Mass at Sacred Heart parish: This Sunday June 5 there will be a 4pm Latin Mass offered by Fr. Noah Carter at Sacred Heart parish in Salisbury this Sunday, followed by a potluck in Brincefield Hall (please bring a dish or snack to share). For questions or to join their e-mail list, please visit: www.salisburylmc.org

Mass of Ages Part II – The Perfect Storm Premiers: Last Thursday, the latest Mass of Ages documentary premiered.  This exceptional documentary examines the question “What went wrong after Vatican II?” and looks into the role of Archbishop Annibale Bugnini, and the role of the Concilium, which was the committee that dismantled the Traditional Latin Mass and designed the Novus Ordo.  To watch it, or Part I, visit: https://latinmass.com/watch

Traditional Days of Fasting During Pentecost Season

Lastly, in the 1962 Missal (or earlier), typically the day before a major feast day (Pentecost, Assumption, Nativity, etc.) was a vigil day to prayerfully prepare for the solemn feast and also a penitential day of fasting and partial abstinence (meat only permitted once per day). Additionally, as our readers may recall, the Ember Days, the three penitential days at the beginning of each season that offer thanksgiving and prayers for holiness, are the other periods of penance. Over the next week the Church commemorates four of these penitential days. Though the fasting/partial abstinence are now voluntary, with all the sin occurring in the world (and in the Church), it may be worth participating in the traditional fasts if you have not done so before.

All days below were traditionally days of fasting and partial abstinence (meat at only 1 meal) unless otherwise noted:

  • Vigil of Pentecost – Saturday June 4
  • Whit Ember Wednesday – Wednesday June 8
  • Whit Ember Friday – Friday June 10 (fasting and complete abstinence from meat)
  • Whit Ember Saturday – Saturday June 11

The “Whit Ember” days are named after Whit Sunday (“white”), which was an ancient name for Pentecost Sunday. Hence the Pentecost Ember Days. To learn more about the Whit Ember days visit: https://www.fisheaters.com/customseastertide8.html

Sunday After Ascension

Christus Resurréxit! Resurréxit Vere! Today is the Sunday after Ascension, and the 4th day within the octave of the Ascension (sadly, suppressed after 1955). We include the commentary on today’s propers: http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/05/the-contextual-orations-of-sunday-after.html 

Here are some updates for this week:

Wednesday June 1 – Day of Prayer and Fasting for End to Abortion (6pm Latin Mass)

With the Supreme Court soon to be issuing its decision on the abortion case Dobbs. vs. Jackson, Bishop Jugis and the Diocese’s Family Life Office is asking people to pray and fast on Wednesday June 1 for an end to abortion, and the overturning of Roe vs. Wade and Planned Parenthood vs. Casey abortion decisions. Faithful are encouraged to participate, attend Mass, and wear white rose pin or sticker to generate awareness about the sanctity of human life.  St. Ann will offer a 6pm Latin Mass as scheduled that evening.  

CANCELLED: Saturday June 4  – First Saturday Latin Mass at St. Thomas Aquinas

Regretfully, barring a miracle, the first Saturday Latin Mass at St. Thomas Aquinas parish is canceled for this Saturday only. Father will be attending the diaconate ordinations of one of his parishioners, seminarian Chinonso A. Nnebe-Agumadu, and the backup Latin Mass priest is unavailable. At this point, we are opening the cause up to the CLMC community to see if they could find a diocesan priest (Charlotte diocese only) who would be willing to offer the Latin Mass at St. Thomas Aquinas parish on June 4. If a priest is available, please have them contact Fr. Codd. There are other first Saturday diocesan Latin Masses in the region:

CLMC comment: Our diocesan Latin Mass priests are doing their heroic best under difficult circumstances to meet the needs of their flock and this should not be taken as criticism toward our priests. Daily Masses are canceled sometimes due to clergy illness, travel, etc., and the faithful are understanding of these situations. However, the potential cancellation of Our Lady’s first Saturday Latin Mass is most unfortunate, particularly in a diocese which subtly markets itself as “Latin Mass friendly”. This situation merely reinforces the view of 97% of the CLMC’s Synod respondents that the current liturgical framework in the diocese is inadequate, and that a dedicated Latin Mass chapel, with at least two dedicated priests, could help ensure the spiritual needs of the Latin Mass faithful.  Please consider praying that the diocese will be open to needs of the Latin Mass faithful at the upcoming final Synod gathering on June 11.  To view the CLMC’s Synod response visit: https://charlottelatinmass.org/about/clmc-synod/

Deacon Peter Rusciolelli to Preach at Latin Mass on Sunday June 5: On Saturday June 4, seminarian Peter Rusciolelli will also be ordained to the diaconate by Bishop Jugis. We are pleased to announce that the next day, Sunday June 5, the future Deacon Rusciolelli will preach at the 12:30pm Sunday Latin Mass at St. Ann parish where he has served the Latin Mass frequently. Please keep him (and the future Deacon Nnebe-Agumadu) in your prayers as they approach their diaconate ordinations.

Traditional Days of Fasting During Pentecost Weeks

As we enter into the change in liturgical seasons, there are customary days of fasting and penance (now optional). In the 1962 Missal (or earlier), typically the day before a major feast day (Pentecost, Assumption, Nativity, etc.) was a vigil day to prayerfully prepare for the solemn feast and also a penitential day of fasting and partial abstinence (meat only permitted once per day). Additionally, as our readers may recall, the Ember Days, the three penitential days at the beginning of each season that offer thanksgiving and prayers for holiness, are the other periods of penance. Over the next two weeks the Church commemorates four of these penitential days. Though the fasting/partial abstinence are now voluntary, with all the sin occurring in the world (and in the Church), it may be worth participating in the traditional fasts if you have not done so before.

All days below were traditionally days of fasting and partial abstinence (meat at only 1 meal) unless otherwise noted:

  • Vigil of Pentecost – Saturday June 4
  • Whit Ember Wednesday – Wednesday June 8
  • Whit Ember Friday – Friday June 10 (fasting and complete abstinence from meat)
  • Whit Ember Saturday – Saturday June 11

The “Whit Ember” days are named after Whit Sunday (“white”), which was an ancient name for Pentecost Sunday. Hence the Pentecost Ember Days. To learn more about the Whit Ember days visit: https://www.fisheaters.com/customseastertide8.html

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • Mass of Ages Part II – The Perfect Storm Premiers: We are pleased to share that the new sacred liturgy documentary Mass of Ages Part II has been released this past week. This one examines the question “What went wrong after Vatican II?”. To watch it, or Part I, visit: https://latinmass.com/watch
  • 2022 Fraternity of St. Peter Ordination: This past Friday, the Fraternity of St. Peter ordained 7 deacons to the priesthood in the Traditional Rite – A Solemn Pontifical Mass was offered by His Excellency Archbishop Thomas Gullickson for the occasion. To watch the Ordination Mass (with commentary) please view this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FjuvRNkaZ4U (while it remains available). CLMC comment: This should give great joy and hope to the Latin Mass faithful that Latin Mass priests are being ordained and are now offering the Mass of Ages.

The Roman Ritual

In closing, we share an article by Dr. Mike Foley, which examines the Roman Ritual which is the traditional book of blessings that accompanies the Traditional Latin Mass. In the article he also notes the connection between blessings and agriculture, as well as the connection between Old Testament customs or rituals, and the Church’s traditional blessings. We share an excerpt:

The Hebrews had a rich rotation of feasts tied to the agricultural cycles of the land, and so too have their Christian counterparts. The 1953 Rituale, with a zest for particular blessings in response to particular situations, contains benedictions for fields or pastures, seed, fruit, oats, young crops and vineyards, first fruits, fowl, cattle and herds (sheep, goats, swine, etc.), horses, lambs, bees, grapes, silkworms, a separate blessing of the harvest, and two different blessings for sick animals. There is also a blessing against floods and a blessing against “mice, locusts, wingless locusts, worms, and other harmful animals.”[3]  But there is one in particular to which I would draw our attention: the blessing of herbs and fruits on the Feast of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary…

…All told, the traditional Rituale does not simply enable priests to impart specific blessings on the faithful or their possessions: it gives texture and greater meaning to one’s daily life and annual routine. A life filled with the blessings and rhythms of the Rituale, especially when shared with one’s family or parish, is a life formed by a culture that is both godly and humane. Thanks in part to the Rituale, the Church, that holy nation of the New Law (I Pet. 2:9) called out from every tribe and tongue and people and nation (Rev. 5:9), is able to say with the Patriarchs and Prophets of old: “What other nation is there so renowned that hath ceremonies and just judgments, and all the law?” (Deut. 4,8).

What Mass are you attending Sunday?