1st Sunday of Advent

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Today is the 1st Sunday of Advent, the roughly 4-week penitential period which prepares us for the birth of Our Lord and Savior at Christmas.  As custom, we provide Dr. Mike Foley’s commentary for this Sunday’s prayers and propers: http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2020/11/the-tempestuous-collect-for-first.html

Latin Mass Cancellation This Wednesday December 1: This Wednesday December 1, there will not be a 6pm Latin Mass at St. Ann.

Advent and Christmas Schedule

To see the Advent and Christmas Mass schedule as currently announced, please visit our webpage: https://charlottelatinmass.org/mass-times/

Rorate Masses in December

As noted in the Advent schedule, many parishes are organizing Rorate Masses, a special Saturday Traditional Latin Mass at dawn by candlelight symbolizing the coming of the Light of the World at the darkest time of the year, all while honoring Our Lady. Here is a listing of Rorate Masses across the diocese. We believe these will all be High or Solemn High Masses.

  • Saturday December 4 – St. Thomas Aquinas, Charlotte – 6:00am*
  • Saturday December 4 – St. John the Baptist, Tryon, NC – 6:00am (2 hours west of Charlotte)
  • Saturday December 11 – St. Mark, Huntersville – 6:00am (Solemn High) (time change – this is now scheduled at 6:00am)
  • Saturday December 11 – St. Ann, Charlotte – 6:30am
  • Saturday December 18 – St. Margaret Mary, Swannanoa – 6:30am (2 hours northwest of Charlotte)

* In lieu of the 6am Rorate Mass on December 4, the normal 10am 1st Saturday Mass at St. Thomas Aquinas is canceled for December 4. Blessing of religious objects will occur at 7:30am.

Feast of the Immaculate Conception – Wednesday December 8 (Holy Day of Obligation)

  • Prince of Peace, Taylors, SC – 12 noon Low Mass (2 hours southwest of Charlotte)
  • St. Ann, Charlotte – 6:00 pm, Solemn High Mass

Annual Blessing of Religious Objects in the Traditional Rite – Sunday December 19

  • St. Ann, Charlotte after the 12:30pm High Mass

December 1 – day of prayer for the end of abortion: The diocese is asking all the faithful to keep December 1 as a special day of prayer as the Supreme Court hears arguments in the Dobbs v. Jackson pro-life case, which **could** overturn Roe vs. Wade. To learn more visit: https://catholicnewsherald.com/88-news/fp/7729-join-the-white-rose-witness-for-life-on-dec-1

December 4 (8am – 3pm): Kolbe Center & Pamela Acker Presentation at St. John the Baptist, Tryon

St. John the Baptist parish in Tryon (2 hours west of Charlotte) will be hosting the Kolbe Center for the Study of Creation, which advocates for the traditional doctrine of creation, presents a Catholic perspective on origins, and examines the problems with the theory of evolution, and why it is incompatible with the teachings of the Church and early Church fathers.  Evolutionism in its current form of modernism has had a terrible effect on the faith, and particularly the liturgy. Hugh Owen and Pamela Acker will be giving presentations. Additionally, as a bonus, Ms. Acker will also be giving a talk on her book Vaccination: A Catholic Perspective and vaccines.  The day begins with an optional 6:00am Rorate Latin Mass (correct time), followed by a breakfast, and presentations from 8am – 3pm. There is no cost, but a freewill offering may be taken. To learn more see this link. (The CLMC co-sponsored the Kolbe Center in 2019)

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • In Honor of St. Cecilia: Memorable Quotes from an Interview with Conductor Marcel Pérès: To commemorate the feast of St. Cecilia last Monday (patron of music), Dr. Kwasniewski has reposted an article with the very talented conductor Marcel Pérès, who over the past few decades has produced some of the finest very early Gregorian Chant compositions and can sound even different from the beautiful chant we hear in our parishes today. If you can find some of his chant albums they are quite unique, ancient, and beautiful. Here is Dr. Kwasniewski’s post: https://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/11/in-honor-of-st-cecilia-memorable-quotes.html#.YaMQ7rpOmHt
  • The Latin Mass as Intangible Cultural Heritage: Writing in OnePeterFive, Dr. Kwasniewski has a crafty and unconventional idea on how to protect the Latin Mass – utilize the secular authorities. In short, he argues Traditionalists may need to look for outside help to protect the Traditional Latin Mass and its customs and culture. He rightly (and sadly) notes that many historical Catholic churches and sites have only been protected from wayward clergy through interventions of the civil authorities (e.g. protecting “historic” buildings or cultural sites). Perhaps this is something to consider, or perhaps not. Yet nonetheless the idea is thought provoking and something even we in Charlotte need to consider for this possibility: https://onepeterfive.com/the-latin-mass-as-intangible-cultural-heritage/
  • Meet the young Catholics restoring wayside crucifixes across France: Speaking of defending and restoring Tradition, we share an article about young French who are restoring the roadside crucifixes that frequently dot the European countryside (France and Ireland).  This article also should give Catholics in the Carolinas something to ponder: If protestants in our area will often plant three crosses along various hilltops, should we Catholics not also erect roadside crucifixes to help evangelize Western NC? https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/249709/meet-the-young-catholics-restoring-wayside-crucifixes-across-france#noredirect

Traditionalism vs. Modernism: The Carmelites Nuns Stand and Fight

We provide an uplifting and invigorating update on the situation of the Traditional Carmelite Nuns in Pennsylvania who are being coerced by Rome to change their 500-year charism. They have made the faithful and courageous decision to reject the Vatican’s 2018 Cor Orans document which essentially centralizes control over religious orders, and imposes all sorts of modernist restrictions that are designed to suppress the traditions of their charism, established by St. Theresa of Avila. Catherine Bauer, the lay director of marketing and development for the nuns explained what they are doing:

“Every monastery has its own idea about how to respond to Cor Orans.  We know of 60 monasteries who are very much against it, but the Fairfield Carmelites are the only ones willing to take a stand.  I think the others believe that if they lay low, things will blow over.  Since the Fairfield nuns received the apostolic visitation, however, it is their head on the chopping block.  Our nuns have chosen to stand up and fight, even if they will be doing so alone.

The Fairfield nuns do not want to be in this position in which they are being forced to choose between their charism and the heart of the Church.  They love the Magisterium, they love the Church and its history.  They have no intention of being schismatic, nor do they want to disobey rules.  They are Carmelites, and they are Catholic.  But this is their Church, too, and they shouldn’t be forced to choose between 500 years of Carmelite history and being in the heart of the Church.

We need the Carmelite nuns.  We need their prayers.  We must not diminish the role of contemplative orders in the Church.  Prayer will save our Church, and it will save our world.  We must protect these nuns at whatever the cost.

CLMC note: Like the faithful Carmelites of Compiègne, the Carmelites of Fairfield are willing to take a stand against the revolutionary ideas and programs now circulating in the upper levels of the Church. At the very least, let us consider not only praying more for these faithful Carmelite nuns, but also begin thinking of practical and local means to keep Tradition alive and protected should similar visitors from overseas come knocking at our local doors.

The Carmelites of Fairfield and the Compiègne Martyrs are devoted to the Traditional Latin Mass. What Mass are you attending Sunday?

Thanksgiving update & Respect Life Mass Saturday 8am

Dear friends of the Charlotte Latin Mass Community (CLMC),

Laudetur Iesus Christus! We have a few updates to share as we head into the Thanksgiving holiday weekend.

Thanksgiving Mass cancellation tomorrow

The Thursday 7pm Latin Mass at St. Thomas Aquinas is canceled tomorrow due to Thanksgiving.

4th Saturday Respect Life Latin Mass

As custom, there will be a Latin Mass at 8am this Saturday at St. Ann for the end of abortion

Advent/Christmas Schedule & Mass Time Correction

  • We share the Advent/Christmas schedule as currently announced: https://charlottelatinmass.org/mass-times/
  • Correction: We incorrectly advertised a Saturday December 4 Rorate Mass at St. John the Baptist in Tryon as beginning at 6:30am. The Mass is actually at 6:00am

Catholic Thanksgiving History

To learn more about the Catholic traditions that influenced the U.S. Thanksgiving, please visit Sunday’s post: https://charlottelatinmass.org/2021/11/21/last-sunday-after-pentecost-advent-christmas-schedule/

Late November Feast Days

This week as the liturgical year winds down, the traditional calendar has some unique feasts in late November. We share a few along with some helpful background both spiritually and historically.

  • Feast of St. Cecilia: This past Monday November 22 was the feast of St. Cecilia, the patron of musicians. Dom Prosper Gueranger had a great reflection on her life and noted she can be an excellent saint to overcome fear. Since many people are anxious or have fear over our country, COVID, vaccine mandates, problems in the Church, etc. – she might be a good saint to have recourse to:
  • …Without doubt, this zeal is not extinct; it still works in some, and its fruits rejoice and console the Church; but why does it slumber so profoundly in so many hearts which God had prepared to be its active centres? The cause is unhappily to be traced to that general coldness, produced by effeminacy, which might be taken by itself alone as the type of the age; but we must add thereto another sentiment, proceeding from the same source, which would suffice, if of long duration, to render the debasement of a nation incurable. This sentiment is fear; and it may be said to extend at present to its utmost limit. Men fear the loss of goods or position, fear the loss of comforts and ease, fear the loss of life. Needless to say, nothing can be more enervating, and consequently more dangerous to the world, than this humiliating pre-occupation but above all, we must confess that it is anything but Christian. Have we forgotten that we are merely pilgrims on this earth? And has the hope of future good died out of our hearts? Caecilia will teach us how to rid ourselves of this sentiment of fear. In her days, life was less secure than now. There certainly was then some reason to fear; and yet Christians were so courageous, that the powerful pagans often trembled at the words of their victims. https://sensusfidelium.us/the-liturgical-year-dom-prosper-gueranger/november/november-22-st-caecilia-virgin-martyr/
  • Feast of Pope St. Clement I: Tuesday November 23, was the feast of St. Clement, the 4th Pope. Dom Gueranger has a fascinating story that confirms Papal Primacy. A controversy broke out in the early Church of Corinth during Clement’s reign when St. John was still alive and nearby in Ephesus, yet the Corinth Church wrote to Pope Clement in Rome for his assistance, demonstrating papal authority:  
  • The Corinthians at last felt the necessity of putting an end to a disorder, which might be prejudicial to the extension of the Christian faith; and for this purpose, it was requisite to seek assistance from outside. The Apostles had all departed this life, except St. John, who was still the light of the Church. It was no great distance from Corinth to Ephesus, where the Apostle resided; yet it was not to Ephesus but to Rome that the Church of Corinth turned.  Clement examined the case referred to his judgment by that Church, and sent to Corinth five commissaries to represent the Apostolic See. https://sensusfidelium.us/the-liturgical-year-dom-prosper-gueranger/november/november-23-st-clement-i-pope-and-martyr/
  • Feast of St. Catherine of Alexandria:  Tomorrow, Thursday November 25 is the feast of St. Catherine of Alexandria who was taken off the calendar in 1969 when the Novus Ordo Mass was introduced but later restored by Pope St. John Paul II in 2002 (it always remained on the Traditional Calendar). She is one of the 14 Holy Helpers, and as this article notes, perhaps a good recourse against Protestant heretics: http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2020/11/st-catherine-of-alexandria-in-counter.html (As a reminder the TLM calendar has several saints who were unjustly removed in 1969 including St. Christopher, St. Philomena – the Novus Ordo’s loss is our gain!)
  • The Miraculous Medal: Saturday November 27 is the optional feast of Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal. To learn more about this feast day visit Fisheaters.com: https://www.fisheaters.com/miraculousmedal.html

God Bless and happy Thanksgiving,

Last Sunday After Pentecost (Advent & Christmas Schedule)

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Today, the last (or 24th) Sunday after Pentecost, is when the Church focuses on the end of the world, as the liturgical year is also symbolic of the history of the Church.  As custom, Dr. Mike Foley has a reflection for this Sunday and notes how this Sunday prepares us for Advent season, which in its own way, prepares us for Christ’s 2nd coming. We should also note, today’s feast day of the Presentation of the Blessed Mother (suppressed when falls on a Sunday) also prepares us for Advent, as it marks the one of the beginnings of the Incarnation history (see our Presentation section below): Dr. Foley’s reflection:  http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2020/11/the-stirring-collect-for-last-sunday.html

  • St. Thomas Aquinas: 11:30am Sunday High Mass
  • St. Ann: 12:30pm Sunday High Mass

Thanksgiving scheduling note: Due to Thanksgiving Holiday, the Thursday Nov. 25 7pm St. Thomas Aquinas Latin Mass is canceled.

Advent and Christmas Schedule

Parishes are now starting to publish the Advent and Christmas schedules and we are pleased to post the announced Latin Masses (or schedule changes) on our website: https://charlottelatinmass.org/mass-times/

Mr. David Carter Receives Minor Orders

It is with great joy that we share that FSSP seminarian Mr. David Carter, formerly a member of our community and St. Ann parish received minor orders yesterday at Our Lady of Guadalupe Seminary in Denton, Nebraska. The seminary is operated by the Fraternity of St. Peter (FSSP), and exclusively follows the Traditional Latin Mass, and as such, Mr. Carter received minor orders in the Traditional Rite. Please keep Mr. Carter in your prayers.

To watch the rich Pontifical ceremony visit here: https://youtu.be/I1AOlwsdKms  (The video concludes about halfway through the Mass/Offertory)

What are Minor and Major Orders? – For those new to the Traditional Latin Mass, there are differences in seminary formation, offices, and ordinations between the Traditional Rite and Novus Ordo. In the Traditional Rite, seminarians can receive “minor” orders such as porter, lector, exorcist, acolyte and subdeacon. Major orders would be deacon, and priesthood. Sadly, these minor orders were abolished or supressed by Pope Paul VI in 1973, and now only available to seminarians attending Traditional Latin Mass seminaries. To learn more visit: https://www.ncregister.com/blog/what-were-the-minor-orders-and-why-do-they-matter

 CCHD – Morally Problematic 2nd Collection

Today in some parishes, there will be a 2nd collection for the Catholic Campaign for Human Development (CCHD), which is administered by the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops and has been found to be given money occasionally to morally problematic organizations that promote abortion or  revolutionary causes. Thankfully the more liturgically traditional parishes are not participating in this collection, but other parishes might. Know before you give. To learn more about the problems you can view at the Carolina Pro-Life Action Network’s website (a Catholic pro-life group here): https://www.prolifecharlotte.org/cchd-2021/

December 4 (8am – 3pm): Kolbe Center & Pamela Acker Presentation at St. John the Baptist, Tryon

We are pleased to share that St. John the Baptist parish in Tryon (2 hours west of Charlotte) will be hosting the Kolbe Center for the Study of Creation, which advocates for the traditional doctrine of creation, presents a Catholic perspective on origins, and examines the problems with the theory of evolution, and why it is incompatible with the teachings of the Church and early Church fathers.  Evolutionism in its current form of modernism has had a terrible effect on the faith, and particularly the liturgy. Hugh Owen and Pamela Acker will be giving presentations. Additionally, as a bonus, Ms. Acker will also be giving a talk on her book Vaccination: A Catholic Perspective, which will take a close look at the COVID-19 vaccines and why they are problematic.  The day begins with an optional 6:00am Rorate Mass, followed by a breakfast, and presentations from 8am – 3pm. There is no cost, but a freewill offering may be taken. To learn more see the attached flyer. (CLMC co-sponsored the Kolbe Center in 2019)

All Souls Novena November 1 – 30 (now extended until November 30th!):The faithful can obtain a plenary indulgence for a poor soul in purgatory each day from November 1- 30 by visiting a cemetery, praying for the dead, attending Mass, and receiving Holy Communion.  The Vatican has now extended this all the way through November 30. See details on our website: https://charlottelatinmass.org/events/all-souls-novena/

Bishop Jugis Decision on Traditionis Custodes: From the pulpit last week, Fr. Reid announced that Bishop Jugis has given him and Fr. Jones authorization to continue offering the Latin Mass as is, along with major feast days and solemnities, weddings, funerals. However, no new regular Latin Masses may be added to the schedule. We presume this framework also applies to other parishes in the diocese. A letter to the faithful may be coming in the future. The CLMC will continue to monitor this situation. One thing is certain – regardless of what happens, the Latin Mass is the future. 

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • The Mythical Thanksgiving Indult by Pope Pius XII: As we approach the Thanksgiving Day holiday, we share with you a magnificent piece penned last year by Sharon Kabel, who examined the mysterious legend of the Friday-After-Thanksgiving Indult, supposedly granted by Pope Pius XII to allow American Catholics to eat meat on the day after Thanksgiving. It should be stated this is a moot point now since the 1983 Code of Canon Law and the US Bishops Conference has sadly allowed a “substitution” for Friday abstinence.  Anyhow, for traditionalists, this is an occasionally debated topic each Thanksgiving and Sharon does good research to find out the truth: http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2020/11/on-mythical-pius-xii-thanksgiving.html
  • The Feasts of Christendom: History, Theology, and Customs of the Principal Feasts of the Catholic Church: As the CLMC has noted over the years, much of the traditions, customs, and culture found in the Catholic faith and Christendom were rooted in the Latin Mass’ well-ordered liturgical feast days and seasons. Learning them and practicing them prayer life, with family, or more publicly with parish community, is a first step towards restoring Catholic culture. Therefore we are pleased then to share a book review by our friend Dr. Peter Kwasniewski who discovered a new book on the feasts of Christendom by Dr. Phillip Campbell. To read more visit: https://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/11/new-book-feasts-of-christendom-history.html#.YZnKULpOmHt
  • Reflections on the Church and America’s New Religions: Recently, an Archbishop addressed a group in Spain in which he warned about the dangers posed by corporations, government, media, etc. in establishing a “global civilization”. One may be tempted to think this is a new letter by Archbishop Viganò. However, it is not so. The Archbishop who authored this address may be surprising – it is none other than Archbishop Jose Gomez of Los Angeles, and the head of the U.S Conference of Catholic Bishops. Granted his talk is mixed with some modern references to social justice and controversial topics from Rome, but nonetheless, it shows that a few more bishops may be slowly (ever slowly) beginning to understand that something sinister is going on with COVID, the cancel culture, and the Great Reset’s “new normal”.  As an aside, to his credit, a few years ago, His Excellency did invite the Fraternity of St. Peter to establish a full Latin Mass parish in the archdiocese. Here is an excerpt from his November 4 address:

“An elite leadership class has risen in our countries that has little interest in religion and no real attachments to the nations they live in or to local traditions or cultures. This group, which is in charge in corporations, governments, universities, the media, and in the cultural and professional establishments, wants to establish what we might call a global civilization, built on a consumer economy and guided by science, technology, humanitarian values, and technocratic ideas about organizing society.”

https://archbishopgomez.org/blog/reflections-on-the-church-and-americas-new-religions

CLMC note: It is a good reminder to consider keep praying for our bishops – especially in light of their abandoning the fight over the Eucharist last week.

Thanksgiving: Catholic Origins

On the feast of Martinmas (November 11), we shared a few articles which discussed the European-Catholic origins of the American Thanksgiving, which was modeled after the feast of St. Martin (Martinmas) and was sort of an end of the harvest commemoration. That is likely where the pilgrims developed the idea of an American thanksgiving. With the American Thanksgiving upon us this week, we wanted to provide some Catholic background on the topic, both liturgically and historically. We re-share the Martinmas articles and some additional ones:

While, as we note above, the American Thanksgiving holiday was organized by protestants, the first true Thanksgiving was actually Catholic in origin, and held 50 years earlier in newly discovered San Augustine, Florida in 1565 by Spanish explorers. Their priest offered Mass (TLM of course) – the first on American soil, and then held a feast. Here are a few articles that explain the origins:

Feast of the Presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mary – November 21

The Presentation of the Blessed Mother (November 21), is often an overlooked Marian feast day. It was, as Dom Prosper Gueranger noted, instituted later in the Latin Church’s history (locally the 14th century and universally in the 16th century). With Mary’s “sojourn” beginning in the Old Testament times, this feast helps us in a sense helps us to prepare for end of the Old Covenant, and prepares us, via Advent next weekend, for the Incarnation, which was at that point in history was only a few years away. Dom Gueranger’s reflection: https://sensusfidelium.us/the-liturgical-year-dom-prosper-gueranger/november/november-21-the-presentation-of-the-blessed-virgin-mary/

The first Thanksgiving Mass celebrated in America was a Traditional Latin Mass. What Mass are you attending on Sunday?

November 14: 6th Resumed Sunday After Epiphany

Laudetur Iesus Christus! As we wind down the liturgical year, Sunday is the 6th Sunday after Epiphany (resumed), which, as we noted last week, is one of the unused or preempted Sundays from last winter that is placed at the end of the liturgical year. For this week’s commentary, we share Fr. John Zhulsdorf’s reflection in OnePeterFive: https://onepeterfive.com/tribulation-be-of-good-cheer/    

This week should be a normal schedule for the Latin Mass:  

  • Sunday: 11:30am (St. Thomas), 12:30pm (St. Ann)
  • Weekday: 6pm Wednesday (St. Ann); 7pm Thursday (St. Thomas Aquinas); 7am Friday (St. Ann) and 12:30pm (St. Mark)

Dr. Kwasniewski Presentation Video

In case you missed it, we are pleased to share with our readers a video and talk of Dr. Peter Kwasniewski’s presentation last Saturday.

REMINDER – Vaccine Mandates Petition:

If you haven’t seen the petition encouraging Bishop Jugis to speak out against vaccine mandates, you can view/sign it here: https://www.ipetitions.com/petition/bishop-jugis-condemn-forced-vaccinations

Religious Exemptions for Vaccines:

As a reminder, the Carolina Family Coalition (CFC), a non-profit founded by Catholic pro-life leaders in Charlotte to defend the family against the secular culture, has published some helpful information on how to obtain a religious exemption (see link below). They can also help refer people to an attorney if need be. Link: https://www.prolifecharlotte.org/obtaining-a-religious-exemption/

All Souls Novena November 1 – 30 (now extended until November 30th!):Monday November 1 (All Saints day) begins the annual All Souls novena where you can obtain a plenary indulgence for a poor soul in purgatory each day from November 1- 30 by visiting a cemetery, praying for the dead, attending Mass, and receiving Holy Communion.  The Vatican has now extended this all the way through November 30. You can also obtain a separate plenary indulgence on All Souls Day November 2nd by offering prayers in a Church (Our Father & Creed).  See details on our website: https://charlottelatinmass.org/events/all-souls-novena/

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • Bread – A Mirrored Curse: Fr. William Rock, FSSP, who offers the Latin Mass exclusively at the FSSP parish in Houston, Texas, writes a helpful article providing the traditional understanding of bread which became punishment for original sin (through the labor it required), became part of his sanctification in the Eucharist: https://fssp.com/bread-a-mirrored-curse/
  • Agatha Christie Latin Mass Indult Turns 50: A few years after Vatican II, when the transitional and/or Novus Ordo Mass was being mandated, several requests were sent to the Vatican asking for an indult or permission to continue offering the Traditional Latin Mass. It’s been reported by pious custom (though perhaps not formally confirmed) that both St. Padre Pio and St. Josemaría Escrivá (the founder of Opus Dei), requested permission from Rome to continue offering the Traditional Latin Mass for the rest of their priesthood. These requests were not limited to priests however. Around this same time, a group of layman in the United Kingdom organized a petition to the Pope defending the Latin Mass’ importance and asking permission that it continue to be offered in the UK. Among the signers of this petition were a few non-Catholic signers, most notably, author Agatha Christie, from which this indult receives its name.  The petition was approved by Rome in November 1971, and led to more petitions for allowing the Traditional Latin Mass usage later paved the way for two Papal Motu Proprios (Ecclesia Dei in 1988 and Summorum Pontificum in 2007) which granted the laity greater access to the Traditional Latin Mass. We mention this as this month celebrates the 50th anniversary of the Agatha Christie Indult. To learn more visit: https://onepeterfive.com/non-catholics-petition-pope-latin-mass/

Archbishop Viganò’s Landmark Address to the Swiss People

Lastly, in these times of “brazen impiety”, it often easy for faithful Catholics to be tempted to fall into a depression (hopefully not despair!) over the actions of Church leaders who often speak, take positions or act contrary to the traditional deposit of faith. Yet juxtaposed such clergy is someone like Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò, whose courageous words should fill Catholics with hope that not all is lost and Christ still reigns over His Church. Earlier this month, Archbishop Viganò, (the former Papal Nuncio to the U.S.) wrote a letter to Swiss citizens protesting against their country’s COVID-19 measures which include vaccine mandates. Most of these people, it can be presumed, are non-Catholics or non-practicing Catholics, and are likely just modern pagans.  Yet, the Archbishop recognizes the goodwill found in their cry for freedom against the “health dictatorship”; and like a tender father beautifully calls them to fight for the highest and true freedom found in virtue, the natural law and in following the teachings of Jesus Christ and His Church. Simply put, Archbishop Viganò cares about the souls of these people and is calling them back to God. Furthermore, he invites them to recognize that the culture of death and the COVID-19 health dictatorship are one in the same. 

At a time when many Church leaders are letting their dioceses bleed parishioners through bad liturgies, watered down homilies, tolerance of pro-abortion politicians or adulterers receiving Holy Communion, sodomy promotion, and by pursuing strange issues such as climate change, Archbishop Viganò, like St. Paul speaking at the Areopagus (Acts 17:18-34), is actively trying to convert lost souls to Christ and grow the Catholic Church. Here are a few excerpts:

“Have you decided to protest because the freedom to not be subjected to health control is the same freedom in whose name you believe you have the right to kill children in the mother’s womb, the elderly, and those who are sick in their hospital beds? Is this the same freedom that would legitimize homosexual unions and gender theory? Is this the freedom to which you appeal? The freedom to offend the Law of God, to blaspheme His Name, to violate the natural law that he has written on the heart of every human being?

Because if what you want is only to be free to do what you want, your demonstration makes no sense. It is precisely those who speak to you about gender equality, the right to “reproductive health,” to euthanasia, to surrogate motherhood and sexual liberty who today hold you all in their grip, deciding what is right for you in the name of “your good,” public health, or the protection of the planet. It is they who before too long will unite the green pass with your digital ID, with your bank account, with your tax, salary, social security and health status, and in doing so — for “your good” — they will be able to decide if you can work, travel, go to a restaurant, and buy a steak or rather some insects.

…I am talking about the freedom to say no to those who, by envisaging progress in the world of work and enthusiastically showing you the free time, you will be able to enjoy with reduced work hours, are reducing your salary, eliminating your union protections, depriving you of the means of subsistence for supporting a family, forcing you to live in ever-smaller and more anonymous apartments that are always further in the outskirts of town. To say no to those who first deprive you of the autonomy of a job by creating unemployment and eliminating professional specializations, and then offer you the citizenship income by which to make you slaves, blackmailed by a State that decides on what conditions you can work.”

We also note that as a faithful traditionalist, in the spirit of Leo XIII, the good Archbishop also speaks out against the degradation of worker rights by the hands of the corporate culture of death and “servile state” and alternatively presents the traditional social doctrines of the Church – something nearly forgotten in this age. We may indeed be watching Church history unfold in a magnificent way in these words of His Excellency Carlo Viganò. Let us consider praying for the clergy of the Church that more will follow Archbishop Viganò’s lead (and for the conversion of the Swiss back to the faith).

Archbishop Viganò, who is heroically trying to bring lost souls back to God, also offers the Traditional Latin Mass regularly. What Mass are you attending on Sunday?

Martinmas and Dr. Kwasniewski Presentation (Video)

Laudetur Iesus Christus and blessed Martinmas Day! This day, in which the Church honors the great bishop, St. Martin of Tours, was also the thanksgiving and harvest celebration throughout Catholic Europe in centuries past. Families would attend Mass, and spent the day in celebration, and feasting on cooked goose. It has been supposed that the U.S. Thanksgiving holiday. instituted by protestants, was to some degree based on this ancient Catholic custom in Europe (more on that in two weeks).  St. Thomas Aquinas parish will offer a 7pm High Mass this evening.

This feast day also served as the beginning of the ancient St. Martin’s Lent (beginning the next day), a 40 day period of fasting an prayer leading up to Christmas. To learn more about this feast day and the mini-Lent that accompanied it, we share these excellent articles posted on OnePeterFive and Fisheaters:

Dr. Kwasniewski Presentation Video

We are pleased to share with our readers a video and talk of Dr. Peter Kwasniewski’s presentation last Saturday.

Resources mentioned in the presentation:

How Often Should We Attend the Traditional Latin Mass?

During his lecture, Dr. Kwasniewski raised several interesting points, the first two, inspired by the rule of St. Benedict:

  • The Traditional Latin Mass is a superior home or environment in which to settle down spiritually (stability of heart and place)
  • It could be harmful to be nomads who do not have a settled liturgical home
  • When one attends the Traditional Latin Mass consistently, one can receive the full benefits and graces this liturgy offers throughout the year

If these points are indeed true (which are self-evident), how can one regularly attend the Traditional Latin Mass in Charlotte, build a spiritual home, and partake in the full benefits of this timeless liturgy, when it is offered so infrequently and irregularly during the week? It’s an excellent question to ask in a diocese that appears to be quite supportive of the Latin Mass – a question many CLMC readers noted over the years.

While on Sundays, there are two diocesan Latin Masses an hour apart, there are gaps in the schedule including early-mid Sunday mornings which are easier for younger families.  During the week, Latin Masses are not offered Mondays or Tuesdays, and scattered Latin Masses are offered from Wednesday – Saturday across three Charlotte-area parishes (formerly four) – leaving the faithful to spend much time behind the wheel, instead of in front of the Blessed Sacrament.  By comparison, Novus Ordo Masses are offered in each neighborhood parish daily, often at multiple times and hours.

Setting aside the supposed restrictions placed on the Latin Mass by the new Motu Proprio, how can the faithful grow in holiness on a daily basis – and save their souls – according to the Traditional Latin Mass and its spiritual and sacramental life, when it is voluntarily offered on a mere limited basis? These are questions that the diocese of Charlotte will need to address if it indeed considers the Traditional Latin Mass to be part of its liturgical vision and future.  Let us continue to pray for the priests and our bishop of this diocese. St. Martin of Tours, pray for us!

November 7: Fifth Sunday After Epiphany

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Sunday is actually the 5th Sunday After Epiphany (resumed), as the Church reschedules certain “unused” Sundays of Epiphany, preempted by the pre-Lent season of Septuagesima, at the end of the liturgical year in November. It can be a little confusing at first, but fortunately, Dr. Mike Foley has a great write-up explaining why this is so in his commentary on this weekend’s propers: https://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/11/holy-leftovers-twenty-fourth-sunday.html#.YYW3cbopCHs

Dr. Kwasniewski follow up: We thank everyone for joining us for yesterday evening’s talk and presentation by Dr. Kwasniewski. We also especially want to thank Fr. Codd and the St. Thomas Aquinas parish staff, and volunteers for their hospitality in helping this event become fruition. There was much positive feedback from the event and judging by the packed house, his message was already resonating among many.  We hope to post a recording of the talk in the weeks ahead and will notify everyone when this occurs.

Sunday Announcements

Here are a few notes regarding today Sunday November 7:

  • Daylight Savings Time Ends – November 7: Please note the clocks move back 1 hour early Sunday morning as we return to standard time.
  • 1st Sunday Latin Mass in Salisbury (TIME CHANGE 4PM): There will Latin Mass on Sunday at Sacred Heart parish in Salisbury at a special time of 4PM EST (for this month only).  No social afterwards but Confessions might be available prior to Mass. F

REMINDER – Vaccine Mandates Petition

If you haven’t seen the petition encouraging Bishop Jugis to speak out against vaccine mandates, you can view/sign it here: https://www.ipetitions.com/petition/bishop-jugis-condemn-forced-vaccinations

Religious Exemptions for Vaccines

As a reminder, the Carolina Family Coalition (CFC), a non-profit founded by Catholic pro-life leaders in Charlotte to defend the family against the secular culture, has published some helpful information on how to obtain a religious exemption (see link below). They can also help refer people to an attorney if need be. Link: https://www.prolifecharlotte.org/obtaining-a-religious-exemption/

All Souls Novena November 1 – 30 (now extended until November 30th!)

Monday November 1 (All Saints day) begins the annual All Souls novena where you can obtain a plenary indulgence for a poor soul in purgatory each day from November 1- 30 by visiting a cemetery, praying for the dead, attending Mass, and receiving Holy Communion.  The Vatican has now extended this all the way through November 30. You can also obtain a separate plenary indulgence on All Souls Day November 2nd by offering prayers in a Church (Our Father & Creed).  See details on our website: https://charlottelatinmass.org/events/all-souls-novena/

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • ‘The Council and the Eclipse of God’ – Part XVIII – by Don Pietro Leone –Religious Liberty – Christ the King (b): Silence in the Liturgy: In another installment on the workings and statements contained in the Vatican II Council, specifically on the problematic teachings on religious liberty, Dom Petro Leone, notes how the original theology highlighted the right of Christ and His teaching in society and government (which was commemorated in last week’s feast of Christ the King), was removed in many aspects from the Novus Ordo Mass and the new Divine Office and as a result led to an increase in secularism, abortion, contraception, divorce and sodomy in formerly Catholic nations.: https://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2021/10/on-feast-of-christ-king-council-and.html
  • A response to the Letters between Westminster and the CDW: A few weeks ago we shared a sermon by exorcist and theologian, Fr. Chad Ripperger, on the future of the Latin Mass, and the motives of those in Rome. Among Fr. Ripperger’s advice is for clergy to not write to Rome and ask for clarification on uncertain matters related to the new Motu Proprio, Traditionis Custodes (in short, Rome may write back with more Latin Mass restrictions). Unfortunately, English Cardinal Vincent Nichols learned the hard way when he received a Vatican reply to His Eminence’s July letter to the Congregation of Divine Worship, which replied by further constraining the Latin Mass and those who promote it. In politics, there a saying “Never give a bureaucrat a chance to say no.” or as Fr. Ripperger noted, one should not ask Rome a question for which one does not already know the answer. Something to consider in all things Rome today. Here is the link to the letters, and Dr. Joseph Shaw, chairman of the Latin Mass Society of the UK with his comments: https://onepeterfive.com/a-letter-from-the-vatican-on-traditionis-custodes/

What Mass are you attending on Sunday?

Dr. Peter Kwasniewski lecture this Saturday November 6, 7pm

This Saturday November 6 at 7pm is our special CLMC lecture series event at St. Thomas Aquinas parish with Dr. Peter Kwasniewski, author, composer, and scholar.   We invite the entire CLMC family to join us and to invite any family member or friend who is still “on the fence” about whether to attend the Traditional Latin Mass. Dr. Kwasniewski will hold a book signing and meet & greet from 6-7pm.

“Given a Choice, Why Should I Consistently Attend the Traditional Latin Mass?”

by

Dr. Peter Kwasniewski

Saturday November 6th, 7pm

6-7pm: Book signing and meet & greet

St. Thomas Aquinas parish (Aquinas Hall)

1400 Suther Road, Charlotte

(Co-sponsored by St. Thomas Aquinas parish and the Charlotte Latin Mass Community)

**Please note UNC Charlotte, which is across the street from St. Thomas Aquinas, has a homecoming game that evening. Please allow extra travel time. **

For more details visit: https://charlottelatinmass.org/dr-peter-kwasniewski-lecture-nov-6/

Christ the King 2021 (All Saints/All Souls)

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Today is the solemn feast of Christ the King, an important day for the Church and the CLMC, that celebrates not only Christ’s Kingship in heaven, but also His reign over all the nations and societies on earth today.  There is also a tradition to organize a Eucharistic Procession to process the King of Kings through the streets, and both parishes in Charlotte will do so today. The feast occurs on the last Sunday in October in the Traditional Rite and is fitting to fall the day prior to All Saints, as the feast day also symbolizes the Church Militant, while All Saints and All Souls focus on the Church Triumphant in Heaven, and the Church Suffering in Purgatory, respectively. As custom, Dr. Mike Foley provides commentary on the prayers Sunday’s Mass: http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2020/10/the-orations-of-feast-of-christ-king.html

Sunday October 31– Feast of Christ the King

  • 11:30am High Mass, St. Thomas Aquinas: High Mass followed by a Eucharistic Procession
  • 12:30pm High Mass, St. Ann and Special Eucharistic Procession to Holy Trinity Middle School: St. Ann will offer a Latin Mass followed by a special Eucharistic Procession. God willing, Father will process the Blessed Sacrament all the way up to Holy Trinity Middle School and back to St. Ann. The procession will take 40-45 minutes and conclude with the indulgence prayers (see below).

History of the Feast of Christ the King

The feast day was established by Pope Pius XI in his 1925 encyclical Quas Primas, which was written to address the growing revolutions against the Church – particularly in Mexico, and is the celebration of an important Catholic doctrine which emphasizes Christ’s kingship over each nation, and how each nation (and city) must explicitly acknowledge Christ’s kingship and His teachings.  Bishop Athanasius Schneider visited us 4 years ago and gave a talk on this doctrine. Below are some additional links of the feast day:

All Saints & All Souls Schedule (November 1 & 2)

Feast of All Saints – Monday November 1

  • 7:00am (Low) – St. Ann parish, Charlotte (this is the only diocesan Latin Mass in Charlotte)
  • 12 noon (Low) – Prince of Peace, Taylors, SC (2 hours SW of Charlotte)
  • 6:00pm (Low) – St. Elizabeth of the Hill Country, Boone, NC (2 hours NW of Charlotte)
  • 6:30pm (Low or High) – St. John the Baptist, Tryon, NC (2 hours west of Charlotte)

Feast of All Souls – Tuesday November 2

  • 8:00am (Low) – St. Jude, Sapphire, NC (Fr. Barone’s parish, 3 hours west of Charlotte)
  • 8:30am (Low) – St. John the Baptist, Tryon, NC (2 hours west of Charlotte)
  • 10:00am (Low) AND 11:00am (Low) – St. Elizabeth of the Hill Country, Boone, NC (2 hours NW of Charlotte). The 2 Masses are back to back.
  • 12 noon (Low) – Prince of Peace, Taylors, SC (2 hours SW of Charlotte)
  • 6:00pm (High) – St. Ann Parish, Charlotte (this is the only diocesan Latin Mass in Charlotte)
  • 7:00pm (High)  – Prince of Peace, Taylors, SC (2 hours SW of Charlotte)
  • 7:00pm (Low or High) – Our Lady of Grace, Greensboro, NC (90 minutes NE of Charlotte)

All Souls Novena November 1 – 30 (now extended until November 30th!):Monday November 1 (All Saints day) begins the annual All Souls novena where you can obtain a plenary indulgence for a poor soul in purgatory each day from November 1- 30 by visiting a cemetery, praying for the dead, attending Mass, and receiving Holy Communion.  The Vatican has now extended this all the way through November 30. You can also obtain a separate plenary indulgence on All Souls Day November 2nd by offering prayers in a Church (Our Father & Creed).  See details on our website: https://charlottelatinmass.org/events/all-souls-novena/

REMINDER: Dr. Peter Kwasniewski Presentation, Saturday November 6, 7pm (6pm book signing):  The CLMC and St. Thomas Aquinas parish will be hosting Dr. Peter Kwasniewski for a special lecture on Saturday evening November 6 at 7pm in Aquinas Hall (1400 Suther Road, Charlotte).  Dr. Kwasniewski is noted author, lecturer, and composer, who will be speaking on the topic, “Given a Choice, Why Should I Consistently Attend the Traditional Latin Mass?” A meet & greet/book signing will take place from 6-7pm (there will be no dinner). An RSVP is appreciated for headcount purposes. To RSVP you can reply to this e-mail or e-mail us at: info(at)charlottelatinmass.org A flyer is attached.

REMINDER – Vaccine Mandates Petition: If you haven’t seen the petition encouraging Bishop Jugis to speak out against vaccine mandates, you can view/sign it here: https://www.ipetitions.com/petition/bishop-jugis-condemn-forced-vaccinations

Juventutem Event for Young Adults –  Saturday November 6, 11am:  Juventutem, the young adults group (18-35) centered around the Traditional Latin Mass is sponsoring a tour of St. Joseph College Seminary next Saturday November 6th at 11am. The address is 22 Arctus Ave, Mt. Holly, NC. Please park along the driveway. Open to young adults, single or married.  For questions see their Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/JuventutemCLT/

Fr. Jones to lead prayers at Belmont Abbey Cemetery – Sunday November 7, 3pm: On Sunday November 7 at 3pm, the CLMC and St. Ann Home School Ministry is co-sponsoring the annual prayers at Belmont Abbey Cemetery after the Sunday Latin Mass.  Fr. Jones will lead us in prayers at 3pm as part of the annual novena. Additionally, after the prayers, we will have “soul cakes” (doughnuts). Attendees are invited to bring their own soul cakes or treats as well.  Water, coffee, and napkins will be provided.

Latin Mass and Traditional News

  • 2022 Latin Mass Calendars Are Here: The Fraternity of St. Peter (FSSP) is now selling the 2022 Latin Mass calendar. If you’re new to Latin Mass and want to follow the feast days of the year (which differ from the English/Novus Ordo calendar), this calendar is a great help: https://fraternitypublications.com/product/2022-liturgical-calendar/
  • Inaugural Catholic Homesteading Conference at St. Joseph’s Farm, Saturday November 13, 8am (all day): St. Joseph’s Farm, operated by Jason Craig, a Latin Mass parishioner at St. John the Baptist in Tryon (and CLMC friend) is co-organizing the inaugural Catholic Homesteading Conference where attendees will learn the basics of cows, slaughtering and butchering, gardening, beekeeping, candle making, etc. Space is limited. The cost for attending the all-day conference/workshop is $150 for the first family member, $50 for additional members of the household. To register click here: https://www.cognitoforms.com/Fraternus/StJosephsFarmCatholicHomesteadingConference?v2 (As noted many times before there deep connection between the land, seasons, agriculture, and the Traditional Latin Mass)
  • Abp. Viganò warns US bishops about COVID jab: The Great Reset wants ‘billions of chronically ill people’: We are pleased to report that His Excellency Archbishop Viganò has written a letter to the head of the US Conference of Catholic Bishops, and all U.S. bishops, including Bishop Jugis, warning them that current scientific data examining the abortion-linked COVID-19 “vaccines” does not justify the “moral permissibility” opinion given by Church leaders last December, who used certain scientific assumptions to reach this opinion. In short, taking the COVID-19 inoculation, as the CLMC and others have long noted based on traditional theology, is morally problematic for various reasons as the Archbishop notes: https://www.lifesitenews.com/opinion/abp-vigano-the-catholic-church-has-a-duty-to-resist-deadly-covid-jab-agenda-of-the-globalist-elite/
  • Should Laity Pray the Breviary or the Rosary?: As a warm up to Saturday’s talk, we share another great piece by Dr. Kwasniewski on which is more important to pray, the Divine Office (traditional one) or the Rosary. For our new readers, the Traditional Latin Mass has its own breviary or Divine Office, that is connected to this Mass. It has little connection to the modern “Liturgy of the Hours” which was invented in the 1960s and does not deserve commentary here. https://onepeterfive.com/should-laity-pray-the-breviary-or-the-rosary/

Cardinal Burke Speaks – Canon 915

After a near death experience with COVID, Cardinal Raymond Burke, in a miraculous way, has returned from death’s door and penned perhaps one of the most important writings of his priesthood and of the Church in America in modern times. He writes eloquently about the need to withhold Holy Communion to those public officials who support abortion, and his experience in defending this teaching.  Of note, he shares a powerful and tragic example of the damage these pro-abortion Catholics have done:

First, in the Spring of 2004, while I was in Washington, D.C., for pro-life activities, I met privately for forty-five minutes with one of the highest-placed officials in the federal government, a non-Catholic Christian who manifested great respect for the Catholic Church. In the course of our conversation, he asked me whether, in view of the serious health difficulties of Pope Saint John Paul II, the election of a new Pope could mean a change in the Church’s teaching regarding procured abortion. I expressed some surprise at his question, explaining that the Church can never change its teaching on the intrinsic evil of procured abortion because it is a precept of the natural law, the law written by God on every human heart. He responded that he asked the question because he had concluded that the Church’s teaching in the matter could not be that firm, since he could name for me 80 or more Catholics in the Senate and House of Representatives, who regularly support pro-abortion legislation.

The conversation in question was an eloquent testimonial to the grave scandal caused by such Catholic politicians. They have, in fact, contributed in a significant way to the consolidation of a culture of death in the United States, in which procured abortion is simply a fact of daily life. The Catholic Church’s witness to the beauty and goodness of human life, from its first moment of existence, and the truth of its inviolability has been grievously compromised to the point that non-Catholics believe that the Church has changed or will change what is, in fact, an unchangeable teaching.

Catholic Politicians and Non-Admittance to Holy Communion: https://www.cardinalburke.com/presentations/catholic-politicians

CLMC note: What if this “highest-placed” official, which His Eminence refers to, was none other than President George W. Bush, who despite his troubled presidency, publicly admired Catholics and the Church? What if he was discouraged from converting or at least privately practicing Catholic teachings during his presidency by all the lapsed Catholics in Congress? How different would his presidency been if he was Catholic, and accountable to a confessor? Perhaps it wasn’t President Bush but someone else of importance to our nation.  Sadly that alternative course of events never happened and instead America was led through many years of harmful neoconservative-liberal policies, many of which continue to this day under successive leaders, that harm families, lives, and souls.

However, returning to these pro-abortion Catholic politicians, a simple question to ask is: Where did these most of these pro-abortion Catholics learn to be “pro-abortion”? If their only weekly connection to the Catholic faith was Sunday Mass, could they have actually learned this heterodoxy at Mass? A Mass that permits communion on the hand, reduces the priest to an effeminate “presider” over a “meal”, a Mass, that is “man-centric” instead of “God-centered”, a Mass that features guitars, tambourines, pop music, liturgical dancing, omits important morally difficult scripture readings, and fails to preach on moral teachings?  While sinners and reprobates have existed at all times in the Church, including the High Middle Ages, how much has today’s manufactured liturgy of our times contributed to this problem of heterodoxy?

We note this only because today there is a popular movement/theory among conservative priests called “Reform of the Reform”. It’s goal is to clean up the liturgical excesses of the Novus Ordo Mass mentioned above, to make it reverent and restore sacredness by adding a little Latin to the vernacular Mass, introducing chant or reverent hymns, installing communion rails, and so forth. While this is a laudable theory, how effective and stable will this project actually be in practice, long term, since it is inherently subjective to the priest offering it and requires ideal external conditions (favorable bishop, long-time pastor, parish resources)? Will this actually result in the conversion of those 70% of Catholics who deny the real presence of the Eucharist (and many other teachings including abortion)? What is the final goal with the Reform of the Reform? A Latin Novus Ordo Mass, facing the tabernacle (ad orientem), with Gregorian Chant, at every Novus Ordo Mass in each parish? Is this realistically achievable?

The CLMC proposes another solution: Rather than expend precious and limited resources restoring parishes, dioceses or even seminaries on a mere novel liturgical experiment or theory, why not just go for the true and tried and begin carefully replacing Novus Ordo Masses with the Traditional Latin Mass? The Traditional Latin Mass attendees, as studies have shown, have a nearly 99% belief in the basic tents of the faith – including teachings against abortion. This is no accident. The Traditional Mass is practically unchangeable, has a 1,600+ year old track record of converting nations and peoples, and is not dependent on the priest’s preferences or external conditions for its reverence nor the subtle catechesis that flows from it. Even in the new Traditionis Custodes environment (which will be short-lived), there are ways to achieve this, as Christ still reigns over His Church.  While liturgy alone may not convert each individual, doing so across a parish or diocese does has the potential to reduce the overall number of pro-abortion, lapsed Catholics dramatically, and lead to the conversion of many more. Even if it had just a small chance to end abortion in our country, save souls, and restore the Social Reign of Christ the King, wouldn’t it be worth a try?

Today is the feast of Christ the King. What Mass are you attending today?

Feast of Christ the King and All Saints/Souls Schedule

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Just a reminder that this Sunday October 31 is the solemn feast of Christ the King, established in 1925 by Pope Pius XI to remind the world that Christ Himself has rights and His teachings and Church need to be recognized by all societies and governments – including Charlotte. There is also a tradition to organize a Eucharistic Procession to process the King of Kings through the streets and both parishes in Charlotte will do so this Sunday. The feast occurs on the last Sunday in October in the Traditional Rite.

Sunday October 31– Feast of Christ the King

  • 11:30am High Mass, St. Thomas Aquinas: High Mass followed by a Eucharistic Procession
  • 12:30pm High Mass, St. Ann and Special Eucharistic Procession in the Charlotte Streets: St. Ann will offer a Latin Mass followed by a special Eucharistic Procession. God willing, Father will process the Blessed Sacrament all the way up to Holy Trinity Middle School and back to St. Ann. The path will go up Willow Oak Road, left onto to Princeton Road, and cross over Park Road to Holy Trinity Middle School (where there will be Benediction) afterwards the procession will return to St. Ann via the same route.  Please pray for fair weather.

    The procession will conclude inside St. Ann parish. This expansion may make the procession long, about 40-45 minutes total (20 minutes one way), and makes a glorious way to fulfill Pope Pius XI’s vision to bring Christ back into the public square and into the streets, as called for in his 1925 encyclical Quas Primas. Last year many residents came out of their homes to see Our Lord processing by their house – it was a remarkable moment that we hope can occur again this year. As custom, we will have flags, banners, etc. of our favorite royal saints and blessed (kings, queens, dukes, etc. who all honored Christ the King during their reign).  We link to an extensive list of royal saints and invite the faithful to bring and process with any images, statues, flags, standards, of saintly or blessed Catholic monarchs or rulers (St. Louis IX, St. Ferdinand, St. Isabel of Portugal, Blessed Karl, etc.): https://charlottelatinmass.files.wordpress.com/2019/10/list-of-royal-saintspdf

As custom, St. Ann will offer the indulgence prayers at some point during the festivities.

All Saints & All Souls Schedule

We have quite a few Latin Masses around the diocese and region to mention. 

Feast of All Saints – Monday November 1

  • 7:00am (Low) – St. Ann parish, Charlotte (this is the only diocesan Latin Mass in Charlotte)
  • 12 noon (Low) – Prince of Peace, Taylors, SC (2 hours SW of Charlotte)
  • 6:00pm (Low) – St. Elizabeth of the Hill Country, Boone, NC (2 hours NW of Charlotte)
  • 6:30pm (Low or High) – St. John the Baptist, Tryon, NC (2 hours west of Charlotte)

Feast of All Souls – Tuesday November 2

  • 8:00am (Low) – St. Jude, Sapphire, NC (Fr. Barone’s parish, 3 hours west of Charlotte)
  • 8:30am (Low) – St. John the Baptist, Tryon, NC (2 hours west of Charlotte)
  • 10:00am (Low) AND 11:00am (Low) – St. Elizabeth of the Hill Country, Boone, NC (2 hours NW of Charlotte). The 2 Masses are back to back.
  • 12 noon (Low) – Prince of Peace, Taylors, SC (2 hours SW of Charlotte)
  • 6:00pm (High) – St. Ann Parish, Charlotte (this is the only diocesan Latin Mass in Charlotte)
  • 7:00pm (High)  – Prince of Peace, Taylors, SC (2 hours SW of Charlotte)
  • 7:00pm (Low or High) – Our Lady of Grace, Greensboro, NC (90 minutes NE of Charlotte)

All Souls Novena November 1 – 8

Monday November 1 (All Saints day) begins the annual All Souls novena where you can obtain a plenary indulgence for a poor soul in purgatory each day from November 1- 8 by visiting a cemetery, praying for the dead, attending Mass, and receiving Holy Communion.  You can also obtain a separate plenary indulgence on All Souls Day November 2nd by offering prayers in a Church (Our Father & Creed).  See details on our website: https://charlottelatinmass.org/events/all-souls-novena/

REMINDER: Dr. Peter Kwasniewski Presentation, Saturday November 6, 7pm (6pm book signing):  The CLMC and St. Thomas Aquinas parish will be hosting Dr. Peter Kwasniewski for a special lecture on Saturday evening November 6 at 7pm in Aquinas Hall (1400 Suther Road, Charlotte).  Dr. Kwasniewski is noted author, lecturer, and composer, who will be speaking on the topic, “Given a Choice, Why Should I Consistently Attend the Traditional Latin Mass?” A meet & greet/book signing will take place from 6-7pm (there will be no dinner). An RSVP is appreciated for headcount purposes. To RSVP e-mail us at: info(at)charlottelatinmass.org A flyer is attached.

22nd Sunday After Pentecost

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Sunday is the 22nd Sunday after Pentecost and the commemoration of the feast of St. Raphael the Archangel. For this week we include Dr. Mike Foley’s commentary on Sunday’s Collect, which continues the theme of preparing for the second judgement, as the Church traditionally focuses toward the end of the liturgical year: https://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/10/thinking-out-loud-collect-of-twenty.html#.YXTNb98pCHs

Feast of Christ the King and Eucharistic Procession – Next Sunday October 31

Next Sunday October 31, the last Sunday of October, is the feast of Christ the King in the traditional calendar. St. Ann and St. Thomas will both be offering Eucharistic processions after their respective Latin Masses to process the King of Kings through the streets of Charlotte.  For the St. Ann procession, as in prior years, we invite the faithful to bring and process with any images, statues, flags, standards, of saintly or blessed Catholic monarchs or rulers (St. Louis IX, St. Ferdinand, St. Isabel of Portugal, Blessed Karl, etc.). The procession is scheduled to march up to Holy Trinity High School and back.

List of Catholic saintly or blessed royals: https://charlottelatinmass.files.wordpress.com/2019/10/list-of-royal-saints.pdf

This feast was established by Pius XI in his 1925 encyclical Quas Primas, to remind the world that Christ Himself has rights and His teachings and Church need to recognized by all societies and governments – including Charlotte (which sadly ignored it again when it passed a resolution this summer affirming special rights for sexual orientation and “gender identity”). These processions are in a small way offering reparation to Our Lord for such acts that offend Him. To help prepare for this most solemn feast, Sensus Fidelium is running about 50 Christ the King sermons/talks by traditional priests over the years that you can listen to: https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLnftOVqh-jlavu1oQmdYcqbfqVPUO6jC8 (the Christ the King sermons start around #100 – be sure to scroll down)

TWO WEEKS AWAY: Dr. Peter Kwasniewski Coming to Charlotte – Saturday November 6

The CLMC and St. Thomas Aquinas parish will be hosting Dr. Peter Kwasniewski for a special lecture on Saturday evening November 6 at 7pm in Aquinas Hall (1400 Suther Road, Charlotte).  Dr. Kwasniewski is noted author, lecturer, and composer, who will be speaking on the topic, “Given a Choice, Why Should I Consistently Attend the Traditional Latin Mass?” A meet & greet/book signing will take place from 6-7pm (there will be no dinner). An RSVP is appreciated for headcount purposes. To RSVP you can reply to this e-mail or e-mail us at: info(at)charlottelatinmass.org A flyer is attached.

Saturday November 6 – St. Thomas Aquinas Parish

  • 6-7pm: Meet & greet/book signing
  • 7pm: Lecture

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • The Sacraments and Emergency Services: Dr. Joseph Shaw, of the Latin Mass Society of the UK, is speaking out against a growing problem in our post-Catholic world, namely, the denying of priests the right to give last Rites – particularly in the case of crime scene. This stems from the tragic death of a pro-life and Catholic MP in England last week, David Amess, who was stabbed by a man of “Somali heritage”. Sadly, local police denied a priest entry to give last rites, saying it was a crime scene, something that was not the case just a generation or two ago: https://voiceofthefamily.com/the-sacraments-and-the-emergency-services/
  • Home Altars Update: More on the New Liturgical Movement’s series on home altars we’ve been sharing over the past few weeks. As uncertainty grows about the future public availability of the Traditional Latin Mass (judging by the state of affairs of the world and Church), more people are building home altars for the Latin Mass. Here is an article featuring elegant woodcarving altars for the private home chapel: https://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/10/home-altars-etc-by-mam-woodworking.html#.YXTLjd8pCHs 

Traditional Catholicism vs. Modernism: Religious Liberty and the False Right to Propagate Error

As we approach the feast of Christ the King, which was established as a call to governments to respect the rights of Christ, and His Teaching, and His Church in society, it seems timely to share another piece of Dom Pietro Leone who examines some problematic statements contained in the Vatican II document Dignitatis Humanae.  The document contains certain statements about “religious liberty” which differs from the long standing and traditional teaching of the Church. The issue is over which religions has rights to worship in the public sphere: the Catholic Church alone, or all religions (Protestantism, Islam, etc.).  Traditionally, the Church has reserved those public rights of worship to Herself alone because to allow false religions the same public rights is essentially tolerating error and heresy which can lead to the loss of souls.  Specifically, according to Dom Leone:

“Religious liberty, the belief that the State must accord equal freedom to truth and error, has been condemned frequently and forcefully by the Popes [2], for the Church teaches that the State should indeed repress falsehood and evil: In the words of Pope Leo XIII: ‘Men have a right freely and prudently to propagate throughout the State what things soever are true and honorable… but lying opinions, than which no mental plague is greater, and vices which corrupt the heart and moral life, should be diligently repressed by public authority, lest they insidiously work the ruin of the State’ [3]. It is true that the State may tolerate falsehood and evil for motives of the common good, but only to the minimal degree necessary: ‘To judge aright’, declares the Pope in the same encyclical, ‘we must acknowledge that the more a State is driven to tolerate evil, the further it is from perfection; and that the tolerance of evil which is dictated by political prudence should be strictly confined to the limits which its justifying cause, the public welfare, demands.’”

The essay goes on to identity how Dignitatis Humanae attempts to reconcile itself with not always with the traditional teachings of the Church, but with two secular documents, the U.S. Constitution, and the Declaration of the Rights of Man, the latter was approved by the anti-Catholic and Masonic French Revolutionary assembly:

“Father Denis Fahey points out that the Constituent Assembly of the French Revolution responsible for the Declaration, of which more than 300 members were Masons, and given ‘the naturalism of Freemasonry, the Declaration… is simply a formal renunciation of allegiance to Christ the King, of supernatural life, and membership of His Mystical Body’ [10]”

It further traces the Masonic and secularist/naturalistic principles found in the French Revolution to philosopher Jean-Jacques Rosseau, who according to both Fr. Fahey and Leone, believed power rests in the people who use it to determine their own ends. Yet this breaks with Catholic teaching which:

“According to the Catholic vision of government, by contrast, power comes from above, which the government uses to further the objective common good of the people.”

The article concludes by showing how this traditional teaching was abandoned by the Church during and after the Council, through actions of Pope Paul VI.

While much of the debate over Vatican II stems over the liturgy and the changes made afterwards, the problematic statements contained in Dignitatis Humanae is an equally important issue as it relates to how a society is to be evangelized (or not) by the Church and state. Much of the lack of progress in the Catholic evangelization of the United States is a result of the effects of such problematic beliefs such as the modern understanding of religious liberty.  Archbishop Vigano and Bishop Schneider have both noted problems with this document as well:

What Mass are you attending on Sunday?