Third Sunday After Epiphany

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Sunday is the third Sunday after Epiphany and it also happens to coincide with the ancient feast of the Espousals of Mary and Joseph.  We provide Dr. Mike Foley’s reflections for today’s Secret oration, and on espousal feast:

Petition: For the Diocese of Charlotte to Re-establish the Feast of the Espousals of Mary and Joseph

On the topic of the feast of the espousals, the St. Ann Home School Ministry has started a petition to encourage the Diocese of Charlotte to re-establish the ancient feast of the Espousals of Mary and Joseph. A diocese (via its bishop) sometimes has the authority to re-establish a feast on the local diocesan calendar, and this petition is trying to generate enough support to encourage the diocese to consider this. To sign the petition click here: https://www.ipetitions.com/petition/institute-the-feast-of-the-holy-spouses

CLMC note: With the diocese’s interest in St. Joseph (declaring it 2020 the year of Joseph), an effort like this would certainly be aligned with the spiritual outlook of the Charlotte Diocese for 2022, as it looks to encourage pious activities for its 50th anniversary year which began earlier this month. And of course, this feast would best be celebrated in the Traditional Latin Mass (we already have the Mass’ propers from older missals ready to go!).

SAVE THE DATE: Candlemas – Wednesday February 2

Candlemas is also known as the feast of the Purification of the Blessed Virgin Mary, and candles were blessed on this day as a symbol of the Blessed Mother presenting the Light of the World to God in the Temple.  As custom, St. Ann will be offering its normal 6pm Latin Mass on Wednesday February 2nd. Immediately prior to Mass, Father will bless the candles in the traditional Latin blessing.  The next day, the feast of St. Blaise (February 3), the candles blessed the day prior are used for the blessing of throats.  

Candles for February 2nd: With Candlemas coming, if one wants to order 100% pure beeswax candles, Lux Candles operated by a Catholic family in South Dakota is a good choice. One has to place orders the old fashioned way – via telephone. http://www.luxcandlecompany.com/

New & Local Catholic Tech Company Offering E-mail Service

As noted last week, we are pleased to share that a new Catholic tech company has formed, founded by a faithful parishioner at St. John the Baptist in Tryon. Fidei.email is a new service which provides private e-mail without the connections to big tech or the surveillance/ marketing industry. It also has plans to offer other tech services. Check them out at: https://fidei.email/

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • Day of the Unborn: Dr. Mike Foley has a good article on why it’s not a good idea to place a civic event such as the Roe vs. Wade anniversary on the official liturgical calendar as the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops have done. It can still be be a day of prayer and penance (as it was yesterday), but it’s another thing to enshrine a secular matter in the sacred calendar: https://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2022/01/day-of-unborn.html#.YezrCvhOmHt
  • Ultramontanism: Its Life and Death: If there is a bad plague afflicting the Church today, it is that of ultramontanism, which is essentially the hyper worship of authority and/or obedience – where anything a Church leader says or does means it is binding and “must” be followed by all.  We saw this play out over the last two years when bizarre and even spiritually harmful COVID protocols were imposed in the name of “obedience to one’s bishop and/or state”. Sadly, may see this playout again should more strange “protocols” on the Latin Mass come from Rome or future “crises” of another kind develop. While one may rightly suspect this problem had its roots at the Vatican Council – it was actually the first Vatican council in the mid-nineteenth century where this problem of ultramontanism began to take shape (technically it may have started with Jesuits back in the sixteenth century but that’s for another day).  Thankfully, Mr. Stuart Chessman of the Society of Hugh Cluny, a Latin Mass group in Connecticut, published a lengthy but excellent history of its history: https://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2022/01/ultramontanism-its-life-and-death.html?m=1#more
  • On “Hearing Mass” – by Dr. Peter Kwasniewski: A helpful reminder of the importance of interior participation at Mass, not necessarily verbal participation as is found in the Novus Ordo Mass. https://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2022/01/on-hearing-mass.html
  • Photos from a Recent Traditional Betrothal Ceremony – Dr. Peter Kwasniewski: If there are any young adult members of our community that is currently courting and have plans to be engaged, one beautiful – and sadly lost – ceremony in the Traditional Rite to consider is the betrothal ceremony. Dr. Peter Kwasniewski has a quick write up on what it is, and some photos: https://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2022/01/photos-from-recent-traditional.html#.YezpMfhOmHt (to request it, please speak with a Latin Mass priest)

January 18 – the Ancient feast of the Chair of St. Peter in Rome

Last Tuesday January 18 was listed as a feria day (no feast day), but in earlier eras, it was actually the feast of the Chair of St. Peter in Rome. This may cause a little confusion to some as February 22 is currently listed as the Chair of St. Peter, but in prior years, this latter feast was to celebrate St. Peter’s first bishopric in Antioch (modern day Turkey). On January 18 however was celebrated the feast of St. Peter’s Chair in Rome – his Pontifical See.

With so much turmoil and problems in Rome today, it may be helpful (and edifying) to learn about Rome’s vocation as envisioned by God, for the Catholic Church, and how God used the infrastructure of Roman Empire to help establish his Church and evangelize the faith – once the mighty pagan empire, the whore of Babylon, was conquered (Apocalypse 18 & 19). Here is Dom Prosper Gueranger’s OSB reflection (in The Liturgical Year), who quotes a speech from St. Leo the Great:

“When Peter enters Rome, therefore, he comes to realize and explain the destinies of this Queen of Cities; he comes to promise her an Empire even greater than the one she possesses. This new Empire is not to be founded by the sword, as was the first. Rome has been hitherto the proud mistress of nations; henceforth she is to be the Mother of the world by Charity; and though all peaceful, yet her Empire shall last to the end of time. Let us listen to St Leo the Great, describing to us in one of the finest of his Sermons, and in his own magnificent style, the humble yet all-eventful entrance of the Fisherman of Genesareth into the Capital of the Pagan world.

‘The good and just and omnipotent God, who never refused his mercy to the human race, and instructed all men in general in the knowledge of himself by his superabundant benefits, took pity, by a more hidden counsel and a deeper love, on the voluntary blindness of them that had gone astray, and on the wickedness which was growing in its proneness to evil; and sent therefore into the world his co-equal and co-eternal Word. The which Word being made Flesh did so unite the divine to the human nature, as that the deep debasement of the one was the highest uplifting of the other.

But that the effect of this unspeakable gift might be diffused throughout the entire world, the providence of God had been preparing the Roman Empire, which had so far extended its limits as to embrace in itself all the nations of the earth. For nothing could be better suited to the divine plan than the confederation of various kingdoms under one and the same Empire; and the preaching of the Gospel to the whole world would the more rapidly be effected by having the several nations united under the government of one common City.

But this City, ignoring the author of this her promotion, whilst mistress of almost every nation under the sun, was the slave of every nation’s errors; and prided herself on having a grand religion, because she had admitted every false doctrine. So that the faster the devil’s hold of her, the more admirable her deliverance by Christ.

For when the twelve Apostles, after receiving by the Holy Ghost the gift of tongues, divided among themselves the world they had to evangelize, the most blessed Peter, the Prince of the Apostolic order, was sent to the Capital of the Roman Empire, in order that the light of truth, which had been revealed for the salvation of all nations, might the more effectively flow from the head itself into the whole body of the world.

The fact was that there were in this City people belonging to every nation, and the rest of the world soon learnt whatever was taught at Rome. Here, therefore, were to be refuted the opinions of philosophy; here the follies of human wisdom to be exploded; here the worship of devils to be convicted of blasphemy; here the impiety of all the sacrifices to be first abolished; for it was here that an official superstition had systematized into one great whole the fragmentary errors of every other portion of the earth.’”

We may consider including in our Latin Mass intentions to pray that Rome is restored to her vocation of spreading the Light of Truth to the whole world.

It’s Sunday – what Mass are you attending today?

Respect Life Latin Mass Tomorrow Saturday 8am

Laudetur Iesus Christus and blessed feast of St. Agnes! Just a reminder, tomorrow Saturday January 22 at 8:00am St. Ann will offer a Low Mass for the end of abortion. 

Afterwards there will be a prayer vigil at Planned Parenthood. For those unable to go to Planned Parenthood, a Holy Hour of Reparation will be led by a deacon in the church.

Saturday is also the 49th anniversary of the tragic Roe vs. Wade decision which legalized abortion across the U.S.  As such, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops have declared Saturday a day of prayer and penance due to its connection to abortion.  In Charlotte, there is much to pray and do penance for as in 2020, (during COVID), there were over 11,000 abortions in Mecklenburg County.

January 22 – Feast of St. Vincent the Martyr

On a hopeful note, Saturday January 22 is also the feast of the martyrs Ss. Vincent and Anastasius. Interestingly, the great liturgist Dom Prosper Gueranger, OSB, notes that the name Vincent means victorious..

January 22: VINCENT, the Victorious, vested in the sacred dalmatic, and holding his palm in his hand, comes, today, to the Crib, and right welcome is he to Stephen, the Crowned, his leader and his brother. Spain is his country. He is a deacon of the glorious Church of Saragossa, and, by the strength and warmth of his faith, he is a type of that land, which is preeminently the Catholic Kingdom. But he does not belong to Spain only: like Stephen, and like Laurence, Vincent is the favourite and hero of the whole Church.

God willing, may the prayers, penances, and petitions be efficacious in obtaining that victorious moment when abortion is outlawed in the United States.  St. Vincent the martyr, pray for us!

Second Sunday After Epiphany

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Sunday is the second Sunday after Epiphany, which commemorates the third manifestation of Christ during Christmastide, which his first public miracle at the wedding at Cana.  As custom we provide commentary on the prayers of the Mass by Dr. Mike Foley: https://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/01/the-orations-of-second-sunday-after.html#.YeNrlvhOmHt

Sunday Mass & Winter Weather:

Due to the potential for winter weather Bishop Jugis has dispensed the faithful from the obligation to attend Mass Sunday due to the weather.  Currently all Sunday Latin Masses in the diocese of Charlotte remain on normal schedule at this time (however you may wish to check parish websites in case something changes). As a reminder, while the obligation to attend Sunday Mass today is dispensed, the faithful are still required one to keep Sunday holy if one is unable to attend Mass.  Here are some suggestions how to do this:

Respect Life Latin Mass – Next Saturday January 22nd at 8am, St. Ann parish:  Saturday marks the 49th anniversary of the tragic Roe vs. Wade decision which legalized abortion. St. Ann will offer 8am Latin Mass, followed by prayers at the abortion facility.  A Holy Hour of Reparation will also be offered immediately after Mass for those unable to travel to the abortion facility. 

Blessing of Candles – February 2nd: With Candlemas coming, if one wants to order 100% pure beeswax candles, Lux Candles operated by a Catholic family in South Dakota is a good choice. You have place orders the old fashioned way – via telephone.  http://www.luxcandlecompany.com/

New & Local Catholic Tech Company Offering E-mail Service: We are pleased to share that a new Catholic tech company has formed, founded by a faithful parishioner at St. John the Baptist in Tryon. Fidei.email is a new service which provides private e-mail without the connections to big tech or the surveillance/ marketing industry. It also has plans to offer other tech services. Check them out at: https://fidei.email/

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • Dr. Alice von Hildebrand (R.I.P.) 1923-2022: The Latin Mass movement has lost one of her brightest candles this past week with the passing of Dr. Alice von Hildebrand at age 98.  A philosopher, theologian, and college professor in the New York area, she was predeceased by her husband the great Dietrich von Hildebrand, who according to sources was called by Pope Pius XII, the “Doctor of the 20th Century”, for his philosophic work. Dietrich wrote the groundbreaking book The Devasted Vineyard, which examined the crisis in the Church after Vatican II.  Dr. (Alice) von Hildebrand continued her husband’s work in her own way and very active in promoting the Traditional Latin Mass, speaking at conferences and giving interviews. Please pray for the repose of her soul. We post a few interviews here:
  • God Created Monarchy: This week will mark the one year anniversary of the inauguration of a head of state, of a government which has over the last few decades promoted abortion on demand, same sex unions, contraception, and most recently promoted coerced vaccinations (linked to abortion). Some of these heads of state claimed to be Christian or now recently even Catholic. While some of these presidents may have been less morally offensive to a degree, they ultimately still presided over a government which is automated to promote policies and programs contrary to Church teachings and to God. Seeing all this, it makes one ask, are representative republics and democracies really the best form of government to advance a society that allows the Church to save many souls? If they could speak, the souls of the 55 million babies who were brutally murdered from legalized abortion in our land, may be in the best position to answer this question. Thankfully though, the Kolbe Center for the Study of Creation (a Catholic apostolate whom the CLMC co-hosted in 2019), has assisted in this effort by posting an excellent essay, using the traditional doctrine of creation, arguing how a monarchy best reflects the government established by God in His kingdom: https://www.kolbecenter.org/god-created-monarchy/ (N.B. For more on the kingship of Christ, please see Fr. Jason Christian’s 2016 talk to the CLMC)
  • Liturgical Arts Journal: Our Lady of Guadalupe FSSP Seminary in Nebraska: Local writer John Paul Sonnen has penned another excellent architectural review in recent weeks, this time on the Fraternity of St. Peter’s (FSSP) Our Lady of Guadalupe Seminary in Denton, Nebraska. This recently constructed edifice (in the last 20 years) has many great qualities to admire in traditional sacred architecture which Mr. Sonnen examines. This would be of interest to CLMC readers not only for the fact that the FSSP priests offer the Traditional Latin Mass exclusively, and operate parishes that do likewise, but also because two St. Ann parishioners and CLMC friends are also seminarians attending this seminary. Take a look: https://www.liturgicalartsjournal.com/2022/01/our-lady-of-guadalupe-fssp-seminary-in.html
  • Vaccine Mandates: What Future Do You Want? Freedom or Tyranny?: Speaking of the FSSP, Fr. Daniel Nolan, FSSP recently gave a second sermon on the morality of vaccine mandates and how the unvaccinated have been deprived of their basic human rights. He furthermore demonstrates why the Catholic Church should be casting judgement on the actions of society and speaking out against the COVID tyranny going on – particularly due to the danger to souls. This excellent sermon is posted by Sensus Fidelium: https://odysee.com/@SensusFidelium:c/vaccine-mandate-what-future-do-you-want:9

Don’t Stop Celebrating: After Christmas Day, Christmas Continues

While the secular world has long forgotten the decorations, “songs”, and feasts of Christmas, and is going through a desolate self-imposed winter fast (until their solemn “feast” of Superbowl Sunday), the Church, through the Traditional Latin Mass, is still in the midst of its Christmas season, which runs from December 25 – February 2nd.  As noted above, today is the second Sunday in Epiphanytide, the extended Christmas season and this article from Dr. Peter Kwasniewski describes Sunday’s commemoration:

“The three great theophanies or divine manifestations honored in this season—namely, the visit of the Magi, the baptism in the Jordan, and the wedding of Cana—are given their full individual due, without haste, without unseemly compression or alternation. Indeed, there is a leisurely feel to this Epiphany season, a sense of time suspended. It is as if Holy Mother Church, like a mother watching her children grow up too fast, cannot quite resign herself to parting from the young Christ.

Epiphanytide is the afterglow of the revelation of Christ to the world, Christ who is the true Enlightenment against which the devil vainly (although at times with considerable temporary success) attempts to establish his substitutes—most especially the rationalist and liberal worldview under which Catholics have been living, and which they have slowly adopted, over the past several centuries, to the near extinction of their liturgical life.”

The Baptism of Our Lord Jesus Christ/Octave Day of Epiphany

This past Thursday January 13, was one of the major feasts of Christmastide – the Baptism Of Our Lord Jesus Christ, traditionally called the Octave Day of Epiphany (Prior to 1955, Epiphany had its own Octave or 8 days of celebration):

Additionally, there appears to be debate among some about whether Christmas season ends on January 13 or February 2. Thankfully, Greg DiPippo helped to clear this up a few years ago (spoiler alert: it ends on February 2nd):

St. Hilary, Confessor and Bishop – January 14

As we move further into Christmastide, the Church introduces more feast days of saints in mid to late January which at first glance may seem to have no connection to Christmas. But as Dom Prosper Gueranger, the great Benedictine liturgist and author of The Liturgical Year, notes in his entry about the fourth century bishop St. Hilary of Poitiers, it has everything to do with Christmas, including his connection to St. Thomas Beckett’s feast (December 29) which occurs in the Christmas Octave:

“AFTER having consecrated the joyous Octave of the Epiphany to the glory of the Emmanuel who was manifested to the earth, the Church—incessantly occupied with the Divine Child and his august Mother, during the whole time from Christmas Day to that whereon Mary will bring Jesus to the Temple, there to be offered to God, as the law prescribes—the Church, we say, has on her Calendar of this portion of the year the names of many glorious Saints, who shine like so many stars on the path which leads us, from the joys of the Nativity of our Lord, to the sacred mystery of our Lady’s Purification.

And firstly there comes before us, on the very morrow of the day consecrated to the Baptism of Jesus, the faithful and courageous Hilary—the pride of the Churches of Gaul, and the worthy associate of Athanasius and Eusebius of Vercelli in the battle fought for the Divinity of our Emmanuel.

…A few days ago we were celebrating the Feast of our holy Martyr, St Thomas of Canterbury; today, we have the Feast of the glorious Confessor, whose example enlightened and encouraged him in the great struggle. Both Hilary and Thomas a Becket were obedient to the teaching left to the Pastors of the Church by the Apostles; who, when they were arraigned the first time before the authorities of this world, uttered this great maxim: We ought to obey God rather than men.[Acts 5:29]

The Apostles and the Saints were strong in the battle against flesh and blood, only because they were detached from earthly goods, and were convinced that the true riches of a Christian and a Bishop consist in the humility and poverty of the Crib, and that the only victorious power is in the imitation of the simplicity and the weakness of the Child that is born unto us. They relished the lessons of the School of Bethlehem; hence no promise of honours, of riches, or even of peace, could make them swerve from the principles of the Gospel.”

Sunday commemorates the wedding at Cana, the third manifestation of Christ during Christmas season. What Mass are you attending Sunday?

Feast of the Holy Family

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Sunday is the traditional feast of the Holy Family, which occurs on the first Sunday after Epiphany. Dr. Mike Foley has an informative article on why the placement of this feast day after Epiphany is the most fitting time to meditate on the Holy Family:

Both in content and in placement, the Feast of the Holy Family in the 1962 calendar captures all of the aforementioned meanings and purposes of the devotion.

In content, the Mass gives us various glimpses into the life of the Holy Family, including their hidden life of “teaching and admonishing one another in psalms, hymns, and spiritual canticles” (Epistle), the Finding in the Temple (Gospel), and the Presentation (Offertory). The Mass’s proper prayers, on the other hand, join with the Office hymns and readings to depict the Holy Family as an exemplum of domestic life and a powerful intercessor for all families.

In placement, by falling on the Sunday after Epiphany the Feast has just the right distance from Christmas. It is far enough away to allow the faithful to take in the early life of the Holy Family: Christ’s birth (December 25), the Flight into Egypt (December 28), the Presentation in the Temple (Sunday after Christmas), the Circumcision (January 1), the Holy Nam[ing] (January 2), and the visit of the Magi (January 6). These foundational events of the Holy Family set the stage for, and enable us to enter into imaginatively, their quiet years together in Nazareth.

On the other hand, the feast is not too far away from Christmas. It takes place before the Commemoration of the Baptism of our Lord (January 13) and the liturgical proclamation of the wedding of Cana (Second Sunday after Epiphany), biblical events that take place after the death of Saint Joseph.

Epiphany Blessing kits: We want to thank everyone for attending the Epiphany related liturgies, and especially Fr. Reid for offering and arranging the Epiphany Masses and blessing last week. Please keep him in your Mass intentions today. We also may still have some Epiphany home blessing kits at the CLMC table this Sunday while quantities last. St. Mark parish in Huntersville may also have them in the Kerin Center lobby. Both parishes have Epiphany Holy Water while quantities last.

Mass Change – Wednesday January 12: In the Friday Five, Fr. Reid announced St. Ann will not be offering a 6pm Latin Mass this Wednesday January 12th due to the diocese’s 50th anniversary Mass (which will be Novus Ordo). However, Father has kindly agreed to offer a special 7am Latin Mass earlier Wednesday morning.

Feast of the Baptism of Our Lord Jesus Christ – Thursday January 13, 7pm (St. Thomas Aquinas parish): The Christmas season continues this Thursday as we celebrate the feast of Our Lord’s Baptism (described in brief in Dr. Foley’s above linked article) with a 7pm High Mass at St. Thomas Aquinas parish. This was also known as the Octave Day of Epiphany.

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • New Intro Latin Online Courses from Veterum Sapientia Institute: The Latin & Greek language institute, Veterum Sapientia Institute, co-founded by Fr. Barone, and Dr. Nancy Llewellyn (Belmont Abbey College/St. Joseph’s Seminary), is pleased to announce its winter quarter online classes which include an introduction to Latin, taught by Dr. Greg DiPippo (of the New Liturgical Movement website which we often reference in our e-mails). Other courses include intermediate levels, and an introduction to Greek. To learn more details and sign up please visit: www.VeterumSapientia.org and see the link here: https://charlottelatinmass.files.wordpress.com/2022/01/2022-winter-flyer-final.pdf
  • Catholic writer Phil Lawler now attends the Traditional Latin Mass: Recently, we featured an insightful article by conservative Catholic writer, Phil Lawler, who observed that it is 70% of the Novus Ordo attendees who deny the validity of the Vatican II Mass (not traditionalists). This week, in an another important article, Mr. Lawler has now announced he is now attending the Traditional Latin Mass regularly. Over the years the CLMC has written about distinctions between the faithful Novus Ordo attendees (e.g. conservatives) and Latin Mass attendees (traditionalists). Now, in this new environment of COVID protocols and Traditionis Custodes, we are seeing conservative Catholics abandon the Novus Ordo and embrace the Traditional Latin Mass. This is helping to break a logjam as modernism can best be fought when the faithful Catholics are on the same battlefront and not scattered in different sectors. We welcome all those faithful Novus Ordo attendees, (or even Protestants) who are making the move the Traditional Latin Mass and pray others will also discover the richness and treasure the Latin Mass offers. Mr. Lawler explains why in this article: https://www.catholicculture.org/commentary/backward-logic-traditionis-custodes/

Don’t Stop Celebrating: After Christmas Day, Christmas continues (Part III)

As the CLMC and others have noted, contrary to the pagan world, the Christmas season only began on December 25 and runs through February 2nd. Here we share a few new articles on the Christmas season, which continues in this Epiphany season:

Sunday is the traditional feast of the Holy Family, appropriately placed after Epiphany. What Mass are you taking your family to Sunday?

Epiphany Update

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Today January 6 is the great feast of Epiphany.  As liturgist Dom Prosper Gueranger notes, this is one of the cardinal feasts of the Church; it retains its own season, and like Easter and Pentecost, it has several Sundays named after it and its own octave. Gueranger also notes there are 3 mysteries of Christ celebrated on this day:

The mystery of the Epiphany brings upon us three magnificent rays of the Sun of Justice, our Saviour. In the calendar of pagan Rome, this Sixth day of January was devoted to the celebration of a triple triumph of Augustus, the founder of the Roman Empire: but when Jesus, our Prince of peace, whose empire knows no limits, had secured victory to his Church by the blood of the Martyrs, then did this his Church decree that a triple triumph of the Immortal King should be substituted, in the Christian Calendar, for those other three triumphs which had been won by the adopted son of Cæsar.

The Sixth of January, therefore, restored the celebration of our Lord’s Birth to the Twenty-Fifth of December; but in return, there were united in the one same Epiphany three manifestations of Jesus’ glory: the mystery of the Magi coming from the East, under the guidance of a star, and adoring the Infant of Bethlehem as the divine King; the mystery of the Baptism of Christ, who, whilst standing in the waters of the Jordan, was proclaimed by the Eternal Father as Son of God; and thirdly, the mystery of the divine power of this same Jesus, when he changed the water into wine at the marriage-feast of Cana.

Epiphany Mass Schedule

Please note a schedule changes  The previously advertised Epiphany Latin Mass at Prince of Peace in Taylors, SC was canceled.   Here are the Masses today:

Thursday January 6 – Feast of the Epiphany

  • St. Ann, Charlotte – 6pm High Mass – followed by the annual Kings’ cake (Rosca de reyes) celebration after Mass
  • St. Thomas Aquinas, Charlotte – 7pm High Mass
  • Our Lady of the Lake, Chapin, SC – 6:30pm Low Mass, followed by blessing of chalk and salt (2 hours south of Charlotte)
  • Prince of Peace, Taylors SC – CANCELLED. There will not be Mass or blessing tonight.

Home blessing kits for Epiphany

It is a custom to have homes blessed during Epiphanytide and to use the items blessed on the vigil of Epiphany (water, chalk, and salt). Below are parishes providing them:

  • The CLMC is hoping to provide Epiphany home blessing kits again this year with chalk, salt, and some instructions. Please check the CLMC table in the St. Ann narthex after Mass this Sunday while quantities last.
  • St. Thomas Aquinas parish is not blessing Epiphany water this year but will be handing out kits of Epiphany water, salt, and chalk in the narthex while quantities last.
  • St. Mark parish has Epiphany Water in the narthex, and also has small home blessing kits of chalk and salt in the Kerin Center (near the front desk).

Holy Name of Jesus

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Sunday is the feast of the Holy Name of Jesus, which falls between the Sunday after the feast of the Circumcision (January 1) and before Epiphany (January 6). We provide a reflection by Dom Prosper Gueranger, who quotes from St. Bernard of Clairvaux:

‘The Name of Jesus is Light, and Food, and Medicine. It is Light, when it is preached to us; it is Food, when we think upon it; it is the Medicine that soothes our pains when we invoke it. Let us say a word on each of these. Tell me, whence came there, into the whole world, so bright and sudden a light, if not from the preaching of the Name of Jesus? Was it not by the light of this Name that God called us unto his admirable Light? Wherewith being enlightened, and in this light, seeing the Light, we take these words of Paul as truly addressed to ourselves: Heretofore, you were darkness; but now, light in the Lord [Eph. v. 8].

1st Sunday Latin Mass in Salisbury – January 2nd, 4pm

There will be a 4pm Latin Mass Sunday at Sacred Heart parish in Salisbury (45 minutes north of Charlotte). Fr. Noah Carter will be the celebrant and will hear confessions from 3:15 – 3:45pm. There will also be a social after Mass in Brincefield Hall – please bring a snack to share. For more information please visit the Salisbury Latin Mass Community at www.salisburylmc.org

Feast of the Epiphany Festivities – January 5-6

Wednesday January 5 – Vigil of Epiphany

  • Prince of Peace, Taylors, SC – 12 noon Latin Mass
  • St. Ann, Charlotte – 6:00pm Low Mass (followed by blessing of Epiphany Holy Water, a 45-minute blessing)  Note: Please only bring EMPTY water bottles/containers. The priest will bless the parish’s large water containers and laity can fill up their empty containers with the blessed water.

Thursday January 6 – Feast of the Epiphany

  • St. Ann, Charlotte – 6pm High Mass – followed by the annual Kings’ cake (Rosca de reyes) celebration after Mass
  • St. Thomas Aquinas, Charlotte – 7pm High Mass
  • Our Lady of the Lake, Chapin, SC – 6:30pm Low Mass, followed by blessing of chalk and salt (2 hours south of Charlotte)
  • Prince of Peace, Taylors SC – 6:30pm Blessing of water, chalk, gold, frankincense, and myrrh; 7pm Solemn High  Mass followed by an 8pm Royal Procession of the Epiphany Crib and Benediction (2 hours southwest of Charlotte)

Defending Conscience Rights video and recap

The Carolina Family Coalition held a Defending Conscience Rights Against Vaccine Mandates event shortly before Christmas, and they have now released the video for those unable to attend. The event was organized to help support Catholic workers stand up for their conscience rights against vaccine mandates, which violate Church teaching. Readers even may see a few Latin Mass faces among the speakers.  To view the event visit: https://www.prolifecharlotte.org/defending-conscience-rights/

Latin Mass and Traditional News

  • New Traditional Catholic Biology Book for Students: Biology: A Traditional Catholic Perspective – 2nd Edition (Textbook): We are pleased to share that the Kolbe Center for the Study of Creation (whom the CLMC co-sponsored in 2019) has just released a biology book that is in accord with the traditional teachings of the Church and is not tainted with evolutionary theory. It’s great for homeschoolers. To learn more visit: https://www.kolbecenter.org/product/biology-a-traditional-catholic-perspective-2nd-edition-textbook/
  • Important Declaration of the Superior of the Fraternity of St. Vincent Ferrer: The Fraternity of St. Vincent Ferrer, a traditional Dominican order that exclusively observes the Traditional Latin Mass and breviary (presumably in the Dominican Rite), issued a statement that they will be obeying Sacred Tradition, and not the strange politics going on in Rome: https://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2021/12/important-declaration-of-superior-of.html
  • Belmont Abbey Basilica Renovation 1964-1965: If you’ve ever set foot into the Basilica of Mary Help of Christians at Belmont Abbey and wondered in a bewildered manner “What happened to the interior?!” – local writer John Paul Sonnen provides some excellent research and documentation in this great article (shared with us by a CLMC reader) about this project which can only be called tragic. Just like the Traditional Latin Mass, only a full restoration of traditional architecture in our diocese and beyond can help restore the culture: https://www.liturgicalartsjournal.com/2021/12/belmont-abbey-basilica-renovation-1964.html
  • Sermon – Do Not Succumb to the Pandemic Madness: We are pleased to share a wonderful sermon give by Fr. Daniel Nolan, FSSP, a Latin Mass priest out west who reminds Catholics of their moral obligation to not participate in someone’s delusional version of reality. Failure to do so will result in tyranny: https://courageousclergy.com/do-not-succumb-to-pandemic-madness?list
  • Traditionalists are Achieving the Main Goal of Vatican II: Last week we shared a thought provoking article by writer Phil Lawler who pointed out that, contrary to conventional thinking, most people who deny the validity of the Novus Ordo Mass aren’t Latin Mass attendees (as critics claim) but the rather large percentage of Novus Ordo attendees who actually deny the validity of the Mass through their disbelief in Our Lord Jesus Christ’s presence in the Eucharist.  This week we share a interesting article from OnePeterFive, in which the author argues that if the official mission* of Vatican II was to evangelize the Catholic faith to the world more effectively, it’s actually traditionalists who are doing it. The article is here: https://onepeterfive.com/traditionalists-are-achieving-the-main-goal-of-vatican-ii/

    (*note: this article sets aside, for the moment, the important and legitimate discussion over the influence Freemasons and Protestants may have had at the Council).

    CLMC note: The best thing any diocese could do to restore the faith and evangelize the world is to restore the Traditional Latin Mass at each parish. All the evidence points in that direction and not the opposite.

Don’t Stop Celebrating: After Christmas Day, Christmas continues (Part II)

As mentioned in last Sunday’s update, the traditional Christmas season only began on December 25 and runs for 40 days until the feast of the Presentation (Candlemas) on February 2nd. This is radically different when compared to the pagan world which ignores Advent and “celebrates” Christmas from at least “Black Friday” until Christmas Eve, then on December 26, it begins fasting from Christmas celebrations and decorations. As this article which appeared in The Remnant during Advent describes, it is an inversion of what the Church teachers. This article was written in Advent but it is still relevant for this festive season. We provide a few excerpts:

“Throughout all of Advent,  Christmas trees, lights, wreaths, and Nativity scenes line the streets and sidewalks. We hear Christmas carols on the radio, in shops, and in stores. In short, we see everything we would expect to see at a Christmas party for almost all of December, and in the week following the 25th, everything disappears.

Advent, rather than being one of the most penitential and sorrowful seasons of the liturgical year, is celebrated as if Christmas has come early, and Christmastide is forgotten completely, tearing us from a premature party and plunging us into the dark, quiet, desolation of winter.

In as much as this is the case, that the modern secular celebration of Christmas in the West has come to be an inversion of the way in which the Church has traditionally celebrated it, and prepared for that celebration, I think that there is cause for great concern, not merely because this represents the loss of a longstanding practice of our religious patrimony, which is tragic in its own right, but because the traditional relationship between Advent and Christmas bears an important symbolic significance, and the inversion of traditional symbolism often has sinister undertones.

…In closing, I would invite and encourage all Christians to restore in their own lives where they can, the traditional practice of Advent and Christmastide. Advent is a beautiful season in its own right, and there are so many wonderful Advent traditions – devotions like St. Martin’s Lent, the Barabara Branch, the St. Andrew Novena, etc., that Catholics can take up while they await the beginning of the Christmas season. Advent doesn’t just have to be a sort of “empty” season of “not-Christmas-yet.” And as for the Christmas season, there’s the feast of the Epiphany, Candlemas, and let’s be honest – who doesn’t want to add a whole extra month onto their Christmas party?

Conforming one’s life to the liturgical calendar is an integral part of the spiritual life, and as Christmas in the West becomes increasingly secular and decreasingly Christian, efforts need to be made to turn the tide. Restoring this liturgical order is a great strategy for restoring Christmas in general, as a constitutive element of Christian culture.”

Christmastide and the Latin Mass News

To keep the Christmas celebration continuing, we share or reshare a few articles about this past week’s liturgies and feast days:

Sunday is the feast of the Holy Name of Jesus. The Traditional Latin Mass always honors the Holy Name with an obligatory feast day on a Sunday (most years).  What Mass are you attending Sunday?

Feast of the Circumcision

Laudetur Iesus Christus on this the seventh day within the Octave of Christmas.  Tomorrow is the solemnity of the feast of the Circumcision, the 8th day when Christ first shed his blood, also known as the Octave Day of Christmas.  We post reflections for tomorrow’s feast day by Dr. Mike Foley, as well as Dom Prosper Gueranger:

Below is a listing of the Masses starting at midnight at some parishes. Please note that due to a last minute change, St. Ann parish will be unable to offer Confessions after the 9am Latin Mass tomorrow.  Secondly, St. Thomas will offer a blessing of religious objects after its 10am High Mass tomorrow

Saturday January 1 – feast of the Circumcision & Plenary Indulgence (see below)

  • Our Lady of Grace, Greensboro, 12 midnight High Mass (1.5 hours north of Charlotte)
  • St. John the Baptist, Tryon, NC 12 midnight Latin Mass (2 hours west of Charlotte)
  • St. Ann, Charlotte – 9am Low Mass (NO CONFESSIONS AFTER MASS)
  • St. Thomas Aquinas, Charlotte – 10am High Mass (followed by monthly blessing of religious objects)
  • Prince of Peace, Taylors, SC, 12 noon Latin Mass (2 hours southwest of Charlotte)
  • Our Lady of the Lake, Chapin, SC – 1:30pm Low Mass (2 hours south of Charlotte)

FYI: The midnight Masses of January 1 are on the late evening of December 31 and begin at midnight January 1.

Plenary Indulgence for December 31 & January 1

There is a plenary indulgence under the usual conditions offered on the last day and first day of the year when one takes part in the recitation of the Te Deum hymn (Friday December 31) and the Veni Creator (Saturday January 1) in a church or oratory. The former is recited in thanksgiving for the blessings the past year, and the latter is to ask for divine assistance for the coming new year. Learn more here: https://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2012/12/plenary-indulgence-reminders-te-deum-on.html (prayers are attached)

Feast of Pope St. Sylvester – December 31

Today, Friday December 31, is the second to last day of the Octave and in the liturgical calendar the Church seemingly offers an unusual choice of a saint during this important week – Pope Saint Sylvester who reigned between the years of 314-335 AD, and was one of the first Popes to not die a martyr. Why place him on the calendar within the Christmas Octave? As Dom Prosper Gueranger mentions in his book The Liturgical Year, Pope Sylvester was the “Messenger of Peace”, who transitioned the Church and society into the peaceful era after Christianity was legalized in 313 AD with the Edict of Milan. St. Sylvester symbolizes the coming of the Prince of Peace, who came into the world with His Nativity on Christmas to bring peace between God and man. Gueranger writes:

So far, the only ones we have seen standing round the Crib of our Jesus have been Martyrs: Stephen, overwhelmed with the shower of stones; John, the Martyr in heart, who survived his fiery torture; the Holy Innocents, massacred by the sword; Thomas, murdered in his cathedral; these are the champions of Christ, who keep guard in the palace of Bethlehem. Yet all Christians are not called to be Martyrs. Besides this countless battalion of the King’s favourite soldiers, there are other troops of sainted heroes which form the heavenly army; and amongst these there are the Confessors, who conquered the world without shedding their blood in the combat. Though the place of honour in the service of the King belongs to the Martyrs, yet did the Confessors fight manfully for the glory of his name and the spreading of his Kingdom. The palm is not in their hands, but they are crowned with the crown of justice, and Jesus, who gave it to them, has made it be part of his own glory that they should be near his throne.

The Church would therefore grace this glorious Christmas Octave with the name of one of her children, who should represent at Bethlehem the whole class of her unmartyred Saints. She chose a Confessor—St Sylvester: a Confessor who governed the Church of Rome, and therefore the universal Church; a Pontiff whose reign was long and peaceful; a Servant of Jesus Christ adorned with every virtue, who was sent to edify and guide the world immediately after those fearful combats that had lasted for three hundred years, in which millions of Christians had gained victory by martyrdom, under the leadership of thirty Popes—predecessors of St Sylvester—and they, too, all Martyrs.

So that Sylvester is messenger of the Peace which Christ came to give to the world, of which the Angels sang on Christmas Night. He is the friend of Constantine; he confirms the Council of Nicæa; he organizes the discipline of the Church for the new era on which she is now entering: the era of Peace. His predecessors in the See of Peter imaged Jesus in his sufferings; Sylvester represented Jesus in his triumph. His appearance during this Octave reminds us that the Divine Child who lies wrapped in swaddling-clothes, and is the object of Herod’s persecution, is, notwithstanding all these humiliations, the Prince of Peace, the Father of the world to come.[Isa. ix 6]

https://sensusfidelium.com/the-liturgical-year-dom-prosper-gueranger/december/december-31-st-sylvester-pope-and-confessor/

A blessed Christmas Octave and a peaceful New Year to all.

Christmastide Update & Indulgences Friday

Laudetur Iesus Christus on this the fifth day within the Octave of Christmas and the feast of St. Thomas Beckett, bishop and martyr. We post below the Latin Mass schedule for the next few days. As a reminder, St. Ann will not have a Latin Mass today at 6pm due to the priests being away.

Thursday December 30

  • St. Thomas Aquinas will offer a special 10am High Mass (the normal 7pm Latin Mass is canceled)

Friday December 31 & Plenary Indulgence (see below)

  • St. Ann parish: CANCELLATION: The 7am Low Mass is cancelled for this day only
  • St. Mark 12:30pm Low Mass will be offered as normal

Saturday January 1 – feast of the Circumcision & Plenary Indulgence (see below)

  • Our Lady of Grace, Greensboro, 12 midnight High Mass (1.5 hours north of Charlotte)
  • St. John the Baptist, Tryon, NC 12 midnight Latin Mass (2 hours west of Charlotte)
  • St. Ann, Charlotte – 9am Low Mass (followed by Confessions until 12 noon)
  • St. Thomas Aquinas, Charlotte – 10am High Mass (followed by monthly blessing of religious objects)
  • Our Lady of the Lake, Chapin, SC – 1:30pm Low Mass (2 hours south of Charlotte)

FYI: The midnight Masses of January 1 are on the late evening of December 31 and begin at midnight January 1.

Wednesday January 5 – Vigil of Epiphany

  • St. Ann, Charlotte – 6:00pm Low Mass (followed by blessing of Epiphany Holy Water, a 45-minute blessing)  Note: Please only bring EMPTY water bottles/containers. The priest will bless the parish’s large water containers and laity can fill up their empty containers with the blessed water from the large fonts.

Thursday January 6 – Feast of the Epiphany

  • St. Ann, Charlotte – 6pm High Mass
  • St. Thomas Aquinas, Charlotte – 7pm High Mass
  • Our Lady of the Lake, Chapin, SC – 6:30pm Low Mass, followed by blessing of chalk and salt (2 hours south of Charlotte), 

Plenary Indulgence for December 31 & January 1:

There is a plenary indulgence under the usual conditions offered on the last day and first day of the year when one takes part in the recitation of the Te Deum hymn (Friday December 31) and the Veni Creator (Saturday January 1) in a church or oratory. The former is recited in thanksgiving for the blessings the past year, and the latter is to ask for divine assistance for the coming new year. Learn more here: https://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2012/12/plenary-indulgence-reminders-te-deum-on.html (prayers are linked here)

Defending Conscience Rights video and recap

The Carolina Family Coalition held a Defending Conscience Rights Against Vaccine Mandates event shortly before Christmas, and they have now released the video for those unable to attend. The event was organized to help support Catholic workers stand up for their conscience rights against vaccine mandates, which violate Church teaching. Readers even may see a few Latin Mass faces among the speakers.  To view the event visit: https://www.prolifecharlotte.org/defending-conscience-rights/

Feast of St. Thomas Beckett – December 29  – Patron of the Church’s Liberty

Speaking of rights and liberties, ach year we journey through the sanctoral cycle and occasionally note a certain saint’s feast day with only a passing thought or reflection on how they achieved their sanctity or its meaning to us today (much to our detriment!).  Perhaps this could be said about St. Thomas Becket, the English archbishop of Canterbury. Beckett, whose feast day occurs during the joyful octave of Christmas certainly deserves closer attention, as the Church just commemorated the 851st anniversary of his martyrdom which occurred on December 29, 1170.

19th century Benedictine liturgist, Dom Prosper Gueranger notes about Beckett:

This glorious Martyr did not shed his blood for the faith; he was not dragged before the tribunals of Pagans or Heretics, there to confess the Truths revealed by Christ and taught by the Church. He was slain by Christian hands; it was a Catholic King that condemned him to death; it was by the majority of his own Brethren, and they his countrymen, that he was abandoned and blamed. How, then, could he be a Martyr? How did he gain a Palm like Stephen’s? He was the Martyr for the Liberty of the Church. (Emphasis added.)

Gueranger continues:

To Kings and Rulers and, in general, to all Diplomatists and Politicians, there are few expressions so unwelcome as this of the Liberty of the Church; with them, it means a sort of conspiracy. The world talks of it as being an unfortunate scandal, originating in priestly ambition. Timid temporizing Catholics regret that it can elicit anyone’s zeal, and will endeavor to persuade us that we have no need to fear anything, so long as our Faith is not attacked. Notwithstanding all this, the Church has put upon her altars and associated with St. Stephen, St. John, and the Holy Innocents, this our Archbishop, who was slain in his Cathedral of Canterbury, in the 12th century, because he resisted a King’s infringements on the extrinsic Rights of the Church. She sanctions the noble maxim of St. Anselm, one of St. Thomas’ predecessors in the See of Canterbury: Nothing does God love so much in this world, as the Liberty of his Church; and the Apostolic See declares by the mouth of Pius the 8th, in the 19th century, the very same doctrine she would have taught by St. Gregory the 7th, in the 11th century: The Church, the spotless Spouse of Jesus Christ the immaculate Lamb is, by God’s appointment, Free, and subject to no earthly power (Litterae Apostolicae ad Episcopos Provinciae Rhenance, 1830).(Emphasis added.)

https://sensusfidelium.com/the-liturgical-year-dom-prosper-gueranger/december/december-29-st-thomas-archbishop-of-canterbury-and-martyr/ (the entire entry is worth reading)

What Gueranger is emphasizing is how much Our Lord Jesus Christ, through His Church’s liturgical calendar, values the liberty of His Catholic Church in the public realm. In fact, so much is it valued that in the Church’s wisdom, the patron saint of Church liberty is placed near St. Stephen and St. John, just days after the Nativity. That’s a pretty big emphasis – and something to contemplate as the secular world continues to encroach on the Church’s freedoms, especially under the guise of a delusional “pandemic”. May the Catholics abroad who find their churches temporarily closed this Christmas thanks to the unjust COVID-19 protocols call upon this great saint before these churches remain closed permanently.

St. Thomas Beckett, pray for us!

Sunday Within the Octave of Christmas

Laudetur Iesus Christus and Merry Christmas! Today is the Sunday within the Octave of Christmas, for this weekend’s reflection we share two reflections, first the great liturgist, Dom Prosper Gueranger’s entry for today’s Mass: https://sensusfidelium.com/the-liturgical-year-dom-prosper-gueranger/christmas/sunday-within-the-octave-of-christmas/ and Dr. Mike Foley’s: https://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2020/12/divine-adoption-sunday.html#.YcYa1llOmHs

Prayers for our priests: In your charity, please offer prayers for our priests who no doubt have a more difficult weekend offering a Sunday’s worth of Masses for at least 2-3 days (in future years we pray they all will be the Latin Mass).

Mass Announcements for Christmastide Week

  • Monday December 27:  St. John the Baptist, Tryon (2 hours west of Charlotte): Special 11am High Mass
  • Wednesday December 29: St. Ann parish: CANCELLATION: The 6pm Low Mass is cancelled for this day only.
  • Thursday December 30: St. Thomas Aquinas will offer a special 10am Low Mass (the normal 7pm Latin High Mass is canceled)
  • Friday December 31: St. Ann parish: The 7am Low Mass is cancelled for this day only. However, St. Mark parish’s regular 12:30pm Low Mass will be offered as normal.

Saturday January 1 – feast of the Circumcision

  • Our Lady of Grace, Greensboro, 12 midnight Low Mass (1.5 hours north of Charlotte)
  • St. John the Baptist, Tryon, NC 12 midnight Latin Mass (2 hours west of Charlotte)
  • St. Ann, Charlotte – 9am Low Mass (followed by Confessions until 12 noon)
  • St. Thomas Aquinas, Charlotte – 10am High Mass (followed by monthly blessing of religious objects)

FYI: The midnight Masses of January 1 are on the late evening of December 31 and begin at midnight January 1.

Feast of the Epiphany Schedule

Wednesday January 5 – Vigil of Epiphany: St. Ann, Charlotte – 6:00pm Low Mass (followed by blessing of Epiphany Holy Water, a 45-minute blessing)  Note: Please only bring EMPTY water bottles/containers. The priest will bless the parish’s large water containers and laity can fill up their empty containers with the blessed water.

Thursday January 6 – Feast of the Epiphany

  • St. Ann, Charlotte – 6pm High Mass
  • St. Thomas Aquinas, Charlotte – 7pm High Mass

Traditional Christmas Proclamation

If you attended St. Ann or St. Thomas Midnight Mass yesterday, you may have heard the beautiful chanting of the traditional Christmas proclamation in Latin. This ancient proclamation was in use for centuries until the late 1960s when it was eliminated. In the mid-1990s, Pope St. John Paul II brought back the proclamation, but modernized the text a bit. The traditional proclamation is based on Septuagint (Greek) Old Testament chronology which lists the years from creation of the world to the Nativity of Christ as 5,199 years. The modern proclamation however is instead based on sort of a modernist evolutionary version which presumes long ages of the earth (unknown ages).  While it should be noted that there are some transcribing errors with the Septuagint chronology, it does more closely aligns with the opinion of the ancient Church fathers who believed the age between creation and the Nativity was less than 10,000 years old, and likely around 4,000 years (hence the 4 weeks of Advent to represent the 4,000 years between creation and Christ). To learn more about this and how the Venerable Bede corrected this please read this great report from the Kolbe Center for Creation (whom the CLMC co-sponsored a year ago at St. Mark parish):

https://www.kolbecenter.org/kolbe-report-9-7-19/

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • Refurbished St. Edward new home to Traditional Mass community: With Latin Masses being temporarily restricted in some places, we share some uplifting and joyous news. The Archdiocese of Phoenix has now erected a 2nd exclusively Traditional Latin Mass chapel in the city of Phoenix, to also be staffed by priests of the Fraternity of St. Peter (a society of priests offering the Latin Mass exclusively). This may indeed be the first time a diocese has two fully Latin Mass “parishes” in the same city and it shows the Latin Mass continues to grow regardless of what strangeness are occurring overseas in the Eternal City: https://www.catholicsun.org/2021/12/16/refurbished-st-edward-new-home-to-traditional-mass-community/ CLMC note: Phoenix has not only two exclusively TLM chapels, but also several Novus Ordo parishes that offer a Traditional Latin Mass, demonstrating the Archdiocese’s flexibility and openness in meeting the needs of all the Latin Mass faithful.
  • Bishop Schneider on Latest Vatican Crackdown on Tradition: His Excellency, Bishop Athanasius Schneider (who visited us at St. Ann in 2017), has offered comments on some recent documents from Rome and encourages bishops to extend “creative charity” to the Latin Mass faithful in their diocese (one excellent way would be to follow Phoenix’s example above): Here Bishop Schneider’s hopeful remarks:
  • We must keep in mind that violent acts do not last for long. The violence and injustice done to a considerable group of model sons and daughter of the Church, through the Holy See’s recent document, will have a counter-effect. The liturgical tradition will be even more loved and cherished. Some priests and faithful will be forced into a life of “Catacomb Masses.” Yet they should not become discouraged or embittered. Divine Providence has permitted this painful trial, in which we are witnessing the authorities of the Holy See persecute good Catholics who are attached to the millennium old liturgical treasure of the Roman Church. They should continue to love the Pope and their bishops and increase their prayers and acts of reparation and penance, humbly imploring God that He may open the eyes of the Pope and bishops and enkindle in them an esteem and love for the treasure of these ancient liturgical traditions. May Pope Francis and many other bishops remember the joy of the days of their childhood and youth, when they heard, or themselves spoke, these moving and ever-youthful words: “Introibo ad altare Dei, ad Deum qui laetificat iuventutem meam!,” i.e., “I will go to the altar of God: to God who gives the joy to my youth.” We firmly hope that, one day, the Roman Pontiff himself will again pronounce these words at the foot of the altar in St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome.

https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/articles/item/5751-exclusive-bishop-athanasius-schneider-on-vatican-crackdown-on-traditional-sacraments

  • Who denies the Novus Ordo is valid? Prepare for a surprise: Often times, modernists or even conservative Catholics will accuse traditionalists (e.g. Latin Mass attendees) of denying the validity of the Novus Ordo Mass of Vatican II. However, in an insightful article long overdue, Phil Lawler, reveals the real surprise – the people who actually deny the Novus Ordo Mass are in fact the 70% of Novus Ordo attendees who themselves deny the real presence of Jesus Christ in the Eucharist at such Masses. This is really something to ponder and ask why are traditionists being singled out when the “800 pound elephant” in the room is ignored. The next time someone tries to bring up this issue, share this article with them and ask what they are doing to combat this offensive unbelief occurring in their own parish: https://www.catholicculture.org/commentary/who-denies-novus-ordo-is-valid-prepare-for-surprise/

Archbishop Vigano – Christmas Message to the American People

His Excellency and formal Papal Nuncio to the United States pens a special Christmas letter to the American people. Like a loving father and pastor, he exhorts the American people to rise up to their vocation and fight the new world order which is built on the culture of death:

Be proud of your identity as American patriots and of the Faith that must animate your life. Do not allow anyone to make you feel inferior just because you love your homeland, because you are honest at work, because you want to protect your family and raise your children with healthy values, because you respect the elderly, because you protect life from conception to its natural end. Do not be intimidated or seduced by those who propagate a dystopian world in which a faceless power imposes on you contempt for the Law of God, presents sin and vice as licit and desirable, despises righteousness and Morality, destroys the natural family and promotes the worst perversions, plans the death of defenseless and weak creatures, and exploits humanity for its own profit or to preserve power.

Be worthy heirs of the great Archbishop Fulton Sheen, and do not follow those of your Pastors who have betrayed the mandate they have received from Our Lord, who impose iniquitous orders on you or who remain silent before the evidence of an unheard of crime against God and humanity.

May this Holy Christmas illuminate your minds and inflame your hearts before the Infant King who lays in the manger. And just as the choirs of the Angels and the homage of the Magi united with the simple adoration of the Shepherds, so also today your commitment to the moral rebirth of the United States of America – one Nation under God – will have the blessing of Our Lord and will gather those who govern you around you. Amen.

https://guildofblessedtitus.blogspot.com/2021/12/archbishop-vigano-message-to-american.html

Don’t Stop Celebrating: After Christmas Day, Christmas continues

“Catholics ought to have a totally different conception of Christmas (from what the secular world offers).” – Dr. Peter Kwasniewski, December 24, 2019

In what is becoming an annual CLMC tradition and a rallying cry for the full restoration of the Traditional Latin Mass in Charlotte, we repost Dr. Peter Kwasniewski’s brilliant December 2019 article which reminds Latin Mass attendees of the treasure and precious gold they have in the traditional liturgical calendar, especially the traditional Christmas Season according to the 1962 Missal (and prior). If one hasn’t read this article, we can only encourage everyone to read it again, and again. While the world enters into their “post-Christmas fast” today December 26, traditional Catholics begin 40 days of festivals and feasts of the Christmas season, which runs in stages from December 25 – February 2nd (Candlemas/Feast of the Purification)  We should be clear, this Christmas season can only be fully celebrated in the Traditional Latin Mass calendar, as sadly the Novus Ordo calendar eliminated much the Christmas season – particularly the Epiphany season: Here is an excerpt:

It is very important for us not to surrender to the secular approach that, in a way, celebrates Christmas before Christmas and not afterward. We should really make an effort — in the way our homes are decorated, the way we observe Sundays and holy days, the stories we read and the other activities we do in the house — to keep the spirit of Christmas alive, even if at a “low burn,” throughout this period from December 26 to February 2. Yes, the great feast is that big of a deal! Such observance also becomes a countercultural catechesis in one of the central mysteries of the Christian faith: the Incarnation of the Son of God. This is the pivot point of all human history and of the story of each man, woman, and child.

CLMC comment: In a materialistic post-Christian world that continues to demonstrate its perverted/inverted hunger for the authentic meaning of Christmas by feasting and impiously celebrating 4 weeks before Christmas, traditional Catholics in Charlotte have a historic opportunity to share how Christmas and the Incarnation can be fully understood and lived only through the Traditional Latin Mass, and its liturgical life that flows from it. Let us consider finding ways to share that this Christmas season.

A few newcomers to the Latin Mass might ask – what exactly is the difference in the Christmas season between the Traditional Latin Mass and Novus Ordo Mass? The CLMC’s Brian Williams teamed up with Dr. Kwasniewski a few years ago to briefly explain how the two calendars differ (and why the Traditional calendar is preferred):

Christmas has just begun and now begins 40 days of celebrating the Incarnation and all its mysteries. Only one Mass in the Roman Rite fully expresses and celebrates the Christmas season. What Mass are you attending on Sunday?

Christmastide Schedule

Laudetur Iesus Christus! As we approach the feast of the Nativity of Our Lord Jesus Christ this Saturday, we wanted to share the Christmastide Latin Mass schedule for the area, including changes or cancellations.

First today, Thursday December 23, there will be the normal St. Thomas Aquinas High Mass tonight at 7pm.

Mass Cancellations This Week

  • Friday December 24 – Vigil of Christmas (ancient feast of Ss. Adam & Eve): Both the 7am at St. Ann, and the 12:30pm St. Mark Friday Latin Masses are cancelled this day.
  • Fasting Note: In the1962 Missal/Calendar, Christmas Eve was traditionally a day of fasting and abstinence (though now voluntary – except the abstinence due to it being Friday).

Christmas Schedule – Saturday December 25

  • St. Ann, Charlotte – Midnight Latin Mass
  • St. Thomas Aquinas, Charlotte – Midnight Latin Mass
  • St. John the Baptist, Tryon, NC – Midnight Latin Mass (2 hours west of Charlotte)
  • Prince of Peace, Taylors, SC – Midnight Latin Mass (2 hours southwest of Charlotte)
  • St. Elizabeth of the Hill Country, Boone, NC – Midnight Latin Mass (2 hours northwest of Charlotte)
  • Our Lady of Grace, Greensboro – 11am High (1.5 hours north of Charlotte)

Sunday December 26 will be a normal schedule (attending Mass on Christmas does not fulfill the Sunday obligation)

Mass Changes/Cancellations Next Week

  • Wednesday December 29: There will not be a 6pm Latin Mass at St. Ann parish
  • Thursday December 30: St. Thomas Aquinas parish will offer a special Latin Mass at 10am (the normal 7pm Mass is canceled for this day)
  • Saturday January 1: St. Ann will offer a special 9am Mass for the Feast of the Circumcision; St. Thomas will offer its regular 10am High Mass for 1st Saturday

See the rest of the Christmastide schedule including Epiphany here: https://charlottelatinmass.org/mass-times/

Traditional Christmas Eve and Christmas Reflections

  • Sermon on the Christmas Star: Around this time of year we hear often about the “Christmas Star” – but what is it exactly? This traditional sermon provides some background on the supernatural phenomenon seen by the Magi. The sermon is posted by Sensus Fidelium: https://youtu.be/IgNiEr_9yNQ
  • The 3 Universal “Peaces”: Dom Prosper Gueranger noted in The Liturgical Year (on the feast of St. Ambrose, December 7), that St. Bonaventure taught that tradition holds there are 3 periods of time where the world will be at peace (the 3 silences). The first was after the Noe’s flood subsided when all of humanity was wiped out (except Noe’s family); the 2nd was during the birth of Christ (Pax Romana); and the 3rd shall be in the last days after the defeat of the anti-Christ. To read the brief except scroll down towards the bottom of this reflection: https://sensusfidelium.us/the-liturgical-year-dom-prosper-gueranger/december/december-7-st-ambrose-bishop-and-doctor-of-the-church/
  • When was Christ Born? This question occasionally arises this time of year. Some argue we don’t know the date or that its inaccurate. In this wonderful book, the Frenchman General Hugues de Nanteuil examines this question in his book, The Dates of the Birth and Death of Jesus Christ (recommended by a traditional priest). He looks at all the historical evidence, the changing of the Julian calendar to Gregorian, Herod’s death, the debates about Josephus’ accuracy, and indeed demonstrates that Christ was born on December 25, 1 B.C. according to today’s calendar. A priest (who recommended this book) once echoed this with a simple question:  Does not a mother always remember when her child was born – especially if the child was the Messiah?   To learn more about the book visit: https://www.lulu.com/shop/general-hugues-de-nanteuil/the-dates-of-the-birth-and-death-of-jesus-christ/paperback/product-2661708.html?page=1&pageSize=4

The 3 Masses of Christmas

As Christmas approaches, there are 3 Latin Masses for Christmas: Midnight, Dawn, and Day. Each represent the three-fold Nativity of Christ and the Masses are all connected to each other, becoming a sort of a triduum (like Easter) or a trilogy.  We provide some great information from Fisheaters.com and a 2016 talk given by Fr. Innocent Smith, OP of New York who based it off of St. Thomas Aquinas’ writings.  NOTE: The below summary is just a layman’s effort and not authoritative or exhaustive. The 3 Masses are:

Midnight Mass: “The Angels’” Mass, symbolizing Christ’s eternal birth, which takes place before creation, hidden from Men. Thus Mass is offered in the hidden darkness at Midnight.  According to tradition, Christ was born at Midnight.

Mass at Dawn: “The Shepherds’” Mass, symbolizing the spiritual birth of Christ into our hearts, where He, the Sun, is like “the morning star that rise in your hearts” (2 Peter 1:19). Thus typically Mass is offered at dawn or early morning when daylight is breaking. The text of Mass focuses on the coming light of Christ that will shine on mankind.

Mass at Day: “The Kings’” Mass, symbolizing the temporal and bodily nativity of Christ, which He processes to us in a visible and bodily form, having put on the flesh. Thus Mass is offered in full daylight as He is now fully visible to men.  The text of Mass (at least the Introit) focuses on Christ’s humanity.  (N.B. Others like liturgist Dom Gueranger have a different order of the 3 Masses than St. Thomas)

Archbishop Vigano’s Christmas Message

Like every year, in the cycle of seasons and of history, the Holy Church celebrates the Birth according to the flesh of Our Lord Jesus Christ, eternal God and Son of the eternal Father, conceived by the work of the Holy Spirit by the Virgin Mary. With the solemn words of the liturgy, the Birth of the Redeemer imposes itself on humanity by dividing time into a “before” and an “after.” Nothing will be the same as before: from that moment the Lord incarnates himself to carry out the work of Salvation and definitively snatches man, who fell in Adam, from the slavery of Satan. This, dear brothers and sisters, is our “Great Reset,” with which divine Providence restored the order broken by the ancient Serpent with the Original Sin of our First Parents; a Reset from which apostate angels and their leader Lucifer are excluded, but which has granted all men the grace to be able to benefit from the Sacrifice of God made man, and to regain the eternal life to which they were destined since the creation of Adam.

A Message from Archbishop Viganò for Christmas 2021: https://guildofblessedtitus.blogspot.com/2021/12/a-message-from-archbishop-vigano-for.html

On behalf of the entire Charlotte Latin Mass Community, we wish our readers a Blessed Christmas!