2nd Sunday After Pentecost (Sunday Mass at Salisbury)

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Blessed feast of St. Boniface! As Fr. Bean mentioned at Saturday’s Latin Mass, this is an important day for the Germanic speaking peoples, as St. Boniface brought the faith to this rough group of barbarians. He also chopped down their idol, a large oak tree, and asked “How stands your mighty god? My God is stronger than he.”  Below are two articles about this great saint martyr and apostle of Germany:

This Sunday is the 2nd Sunday after Pentecost, and in some places, the external solemnity of the feast of Corpus Christi. As a reminder, the Traditional Rite celebrates Corpus Christi, on the Thursday after Trinity Sunday. Corpus Christi Thursday was, and still is, an important feast day, one that used to be a Holy Day of obligation, and prior to 1955, used to have its own octave, which ends right before the feast of the Sacred Heart. As custom, Dr. Mike Foley has commentary on this feast day:

https://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/06/the-wonderful-collect-of-corpus-christi.html

First Sunday Latin Mass, 3pm at Sacred Heart parish in Salisbury

Sunday June 6 is 1st Sunday, and a 3pm Traditional Latin Mass will be offered at Sacred Heart parish in Salisbury. The celebrant will be Fr. Robert Ferguson, FSSP.

Feast of the Sacred Heart – this Friday June 11 

This Friday is the feast of the Sacred Heart, a major feast day within the Church. To learn more visit Fisheaters.com: https://www.fisheaters.com/customstimeafterpentecost4.html and Dom Prosper Gueranger: https://sensusfidelium.us/the-liturgical-year-dom-prosper-gueranger/the-time-after-pentecost/friday-after-the-octave-of-corpus-christi/

Masses for Feast of the Sacred Heart – Friday June 11

7am – (Low): St. Ann

12:30pm (Low): St. Mark

7pm (High): St. Ann – the parish’s annual orchestral Mass

Feast of SS. Peter and Paul –Tuesday June 29: The Cathedral will offer its annual Solemn High Latin Mass at 7pm on June 29. It will be with the Cathedral Choir and feature Missa Brevis in E minor by Carl Heinrich Biber.

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • Photos of a Traditional Ordination: The Fraternity of St. Peter, a religious society of priests which offers the Traditional Latin Mass exclusively, recently posted photos of the traditional ordination Mass which was administered by Auxiliary Bishop Joseph Perry of Chicago: https://fssp.com/fssp-ordinations-2021-photopost/  
  • Archbishop Viganò Exposes the Great Reset: Another instructive letter by Abp. Viganò on the masonic “Great Reset”, which should sound eerily familiar to those attending the Traditional Latin Mass – as His Excellency notes, this Great Reset was also attempted in the Church in the 1960s. There was an alleged “crisis” that required a “new normal” or a New Order (Novus Ordo) to replace 2,000 years of Church tradition:

    In this long series of Great Resets organized by the same elite of conspirators, not even the Catholic Church has managed to escape. Think about it: what did the liturgists of the Council tell us when they wanted to impose the reformed Mass on us? That the people did not understand, that the liturgy had to be made understandable in order to allow for a greater participation of the faithful. And in the name of that prophasis, of that false pretext, they did not simply translate the Apostolic Mass into the vernacular, but instead they invented a different Mass altogether, because they wanted to cancel the primary doctrinal obstacle to ecumenical dialogue with the Protestants, indoctrinating the faithful into the new ecclesiology of Vatican II.

    We know that the lie is the emblem of the devil, the distinctive sign of his servants, the hallmark of the enemies of God and the Church. God is Truth; the Word of God is true, and He Himself is God. Speaking the Truth, shouting it from the rooftops, uncovering the deception and its creators is a sacred work, and no Catholic – nor anyone who has still preserved a shred of decency and honor – may shrink from this duty.

    https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/articles/item/5403-sons-of-the-devil-vigano-exposes-on-the-great-reset

Church Documents on the Traditional Latin Mass (1969 – 2019)

As Archbishop Viganò notes, certain liturgists foisted a “Great Reset” on the Church in the 1960s. While they almost succeeded, a small a remnant across the Church banded together and immediately defended and fought for the restoration of the Traditional Latin Mass, and its accompanying theology, traditions, customs and culture. That heroic struggle didn’t occur just in Rome or in other faraway places, but also happened right here in Charlotte during the very dark days of the 1970s and 1980s as some of the “old warriors” who sit in our pews on Sunday can tell you.  That battle continues to this day, and will continue until the Traditional Latin Mass is fully restored as the Mass of the Roman Rite. A Sunday Latin Mass in a Novus Ordo parish is certainly not a complete victory nor a finality.

At this point however, it might be helpful to understand where we came from, at least from an ecclesiastical perspective, since Vatican II. Although by no means exhaustive, the CLMC has provided a layman’s list and summary of the major Vatican documents affecting the Traditional Latin Mass.  One can see the progress traditionalists made in partially restoring the Traditional Latin Mass yet much work and more battles remain. That said, it’s helpful though to pause and see where traditionalists have won some victories – so we can claim even more for the Empire of Christ in the months and years ahead.

To view our page visit: https://charlottelatinmass.org/resources/tlm-documents/

Trinity Sunday (Octave of Pentecost)

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Sunday is the ancient octave day of Pentecost, otherwise known as the feast of the Most Holy Trinity, the beginning of the season after Pentecost.  Dr. Mike Foley provides commentary on Sunday’s Collect: https://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/05/the-confessional-collect-of-trinity.html

June Festal Latin Masses

As the Church moves into the season after Pentecost, June has some important feast days to celebrate:

Feast of Corpus Christi – Thursday June 3: 7pm (High): St. Thomas Aquinas, with Eucharistic Procession to follow

Feast of the Sacred Heart – Friday June 11

7am – (Low): St. Ann

12:30pm (Low): St. Mark

7pm (High): St. Ann – the parish’s annual orchestral Mass

Feast of SS. Peter and Paul –Tuesday June 29: 7pm (High), Cathedral of St. Patrick. It will be with the Cathedral Choir and feature Missa Brevis in E minor by Carl Heinrich Biber.

June – The month of octaves: June can also be thought of as a month of ancient octaves. Prior to Bugnini’s liturgical “reforms” of 1955, the church celebrated many more octaves than today. In fact, June would not only have the octave of Pentecost (if Easter/Ascension occurred late enough), but also commemorated octaves of Corpus Christi; Sacred Heart; and of Ss. Peter and Paul – each for 8 days. Occasionally, this also would mean a saint’s feast day was placed on the calendar only after a certain octave concluded, such as St. Isabel of Portugal who died on July 4 (during the Octave of Ss. Peter & Paul); thus her feast day was fixed to July 8. The same occurred with St. Thomas More, who was martyred on July 6 (octave day of Ss. Peter and Paul), but is celebrated in the Traditional Rite on July 9.  As the Church rediscovers the Traditional Latin Mass, especially the calendar prior to 1955, we can pray for a return to more of these octaves, as some feasts are too glorious to be celebrated for just one day. Also please see the last article below on the importance of the octave of Pentecost.

Juventutem is hosting a new series – beginning this Tuesday June 1, 7pm at St. Mark

Juventutem, the young adults group (18-35) centered around the Traditional Latin Mass has a new event series to announce: Beginning Tuesday June 1st, we will consistently gather every first and third Tuesday of the month at St. Mark’s Kerin Center at 7pm (Room 202) for study, discussion, and prayer. During these sessions we will explore the nature of Tradition in the history of the Catholic Church beginning with the Mass. Each evening will conclude with night prayer in the chapel. Open to young adults, married or single, ages 18-35. For details see this page: https://charlottelatinmass.org/about/juventutem/  

Traditional Men’s Recollection with the Institute of Christ the King Sovereign Priest – Saturday June 26

The Latin Mass faithful in Raleigh have again invited the Institute of Christ the King for a men’s day of recollection and Mass on Saturday June 26. The Institute is a priestly religious order that exclusively offers the Traditional Latin Mass and operate parishes in the US and around the world. The recollection is for men, but the Mass is open to the public.

Saturday, June 26, 2021 at 9:00 AM – 12:30 PM EDT

Offered by Canon Matthew Weaver of the Institute of Christ the King Sovereign Priest

Saint Joseph Catholic Church, 2809 Poole Rd, Raleigh, NC 27610

9:00 am: Men’s Recollection

10:00 am: Rosary

10:30 am: High Mass

Confessions available

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • St. Philomena anniversary: This past Tuesday, May 25, was the 219 anniversary of the discovery of St. Philomena’s relics in Rome. Her feast day in the Traditional calendar is on August 13, but sadly it was removed shortly before Vatican II (perhaps by Bugnini), but she is still a saint, counts St. John Vianney was one of her devotes, and a powerful intercessor as we saw within our own community earlier this year. Like the octaves, God willing, she will be restored to the calendar. Here is more info: https://www.vaticannews.va/en/saints/08/13/saint-philomena.html
    Sanctuary of St. Philomena in Italy: http://www.shophilomena.com/
  • Mass of Ages – The Liturgy Film: Several months ago we mentioned a landmark documentary is underway to promote the Traditional Mass to those still attending the Novus Ordo Mass.  We are pleased to announce the film will be released on the feast of the Assumption and will now be a 3 part trilogy. To learn more and signup for updates please visit: https://theliturgy.org/
  • New Scientific Article on the (low) risk of COVID from Communion kneeling: In an interesting post-COVID wrap-up, Dr. Joseph Shaw, chair of the Latin Mass Society of the UK shares a report about how kneeling to receive Holy Communion on the tongue is actually a safer way than standing. It probably goes without saying the risk of COVID is much lower at a TLM: https://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2021/05/new-scientific-article-on-the-risk-of.html
  • Mexico’s First Traditional Ordination in Decades: The Mexican Church made history last week when Cardinal Burke ordained new men to the priesthood in the Traditional Rite. His Eminence was visiting for the Fraternity of St. Peter’s Mexico apostolate in Guadalajara, which also has a school of formation. As readers know, like the Institute of Christ the King, Fraternity of St. Peter priests offer the Traditional Latin Mass exclusively, and hence the Ordination Mass is in the Traditional Rite – something we pray can happen here in Charlotte someday (diocesan or religious): https://fssp.com/mexicos-first-traditional-ordination-in-decades/
  • The Eighth Week: The Wisdom of the Traditional Pentecost Octave – Guest Article by a Benedictine Monk: On the topic of octaves, this excellent article details the importance of the having the traditional octave of Pentecost. Below is an excerpt showing the problems of the Novus Ordo/Bugnini reforms which removed octaves and other seasons (like pre-Lent Septuagesima) after Vatican II:

Conversely, from a practical perspective, just as, due to the suppression of Septuagesima, the abrupt start of Lent on Ash Wednesday without transition from “ordinary time” feels strange, so does it feel odd, after the jubilant celebration of Pentecost Sunday, to find oneself all of a sudden, and without transition, in “ordinary time”, as if nothing had happened the day before.

The suppression of the octave, however, would create a number of other problems. So it is when a complex work of art is deemed too ornate, and one tries to simplify it. Can you imagine trying to “simplify” Chartres Cathedral or Vivaldi’s Four Seasons?

The Novus Ordo’s abrupt end to Eastertide on the very evening of Pentecost Sunday seems to indicate that, now that we have the Spirit, there is nothing to worry about. But we know this is not true.

The old liturgy on the other hand, as in so many other realms, is a school of humility. We have the Holy Spirit; if we lose Him, it will be no fault of His. This is exactly what the octave of Pentecost helped us to not forget: we can lose Him through our fault if we cease to pray and to ask for His guidance. This can happen to all the members of the Church, including its shepherds.

https://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/05/the-eighth-week-wisdom-of-traditional.html

This magnificent article shows the connection between right worship and belief and actually links the removal of the octave of Pentecost to the weakening of the Church, especially seen in Church leaders’ behavior during COVID lockdowns, and speaking foolishly about climate change, vaccines, etc.

The principle of lex orandi, lex credendi (roughly translated, how we pray, is how we believe), can clearly be seen in the Vatican II Church with the removal of this octave (which as we’ve noted above actually began in 1955). How can we change this? Simply by starting to attend the Traditional Latin Mass at least on Sundays, and incorporating its liturgical calendar into one’s prayer and family life.

Whit Embertide

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Just a reminder this week is Whit Embertide, or the Ember Days of Pentecost.

As our readers may recall, the Ember Days are the 3 penitential days in the 1962 calendar, occurring at the beginning of each season, that offer thanksgiving and prayers for holiness in the upcoming season.  This week is the Whit Ember Days for the summer season and occurs on the following dates below.  Though the below fasting/partial abstinence days are now voluntary, with all the sin occurring in the world (and in the Church), it may be worth participating in the traditional fasts if you have not done so before.

  • Whit Ember Wednesday – Wednesday May 26 (fasting, partial abstinence), St. Ann, 6pm Low Mass
  • Whit Ember Friday – Friday May 28 (fasting and since its Friday, complete abstinence from meat), St. Ann, 7am Low Mass; St. Mark 12:30pm Low Mass
  • Whit Ember Saturday – Saturday May 29 (fasting, partial abstinence), no diocesan Latin Masses in Charlotte currently scheduled.

The “Whit Ember” days are named after Whit Sunday (“white”), which was an ancient name for Pentecost Sunday and the robes worn by catechumens that day. To learn more about the Whit Ember days visit: https://www.fisheaters.com/customseastertide8.html

Additionally, these Embertide articles may also be of interest:

Pentecost Sunday (Whitsunday)

Laudetur Iesus Christus and blessed feast of Pentecost, also known as Whitsunday (for the Easter catechumens who would again wear white at Mass). It’s one of the most important feast days in the Church’s liturgical year (next to Christmas, and Easter). Dr. Mike Foley provides commentary on this grand feast day:
https://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/05/the-orations-of-feast-of-pentecost.html

Plenary Indulgence for Pentecost

There is a plenary indulgence today, Pentecost Sunday, to all who pray the Veni Creator – ‘Come Holy Spirit’ under the usual conditions. This will normally be prayed during the Sunday Latin Mass.

Vigil of Pentecost 

While Pentecost is a solemn feast day, the day preceding it also worthy to note – the Vigil of Pentecost. Before 1955, this vigil day featured one of the most beautiful liturgies in the Church. It served as a “bookend” to the Eastertide season and this Mass was much a mirror of the Easter Vigil Mass in many ways. The nearly 3 hour Mass begins with folded chasubles, penitential vestments, a reading of 6 Old Testament prophecies (instead of 12), and baptisms (if there were catechumens). To learn more see our entry from last Pentecost:
https://charlottelatinmass.org/2020/05/30/vigil-of-pentecost-update-2/

Sadly one of the practical challenges of having Traditional Latin Masses in Novus Ordo parishes is that certain vigils such as the Vigil of Pentecost, or even the hauntingly sublime Mass of All Hallows Eve (October 31) often cannot be offered in the afternoons or evenings due to the Novus Ordo “anticipatory Mass” that occurs the evening before holydays or Sundays. Another challenge is the limited familiarity and public recitation of the traditional 1962 breviary (Matins, Lauds, Vespers, etc.) that follows the Traditional Latin Mass and which is different than the Novus Ordo’s Liturgy of the Hours. That is perhaps a topic to cover another time. However, we close this section with Dom Prosper Gueranger’s comments on the Vigil of Pentecost:

The dazzling splendor of tomorrow’s Solemnity forecasts its beauty on this day of its Vigil. The Faithful are preparing themselves by Fasting to celebrate the glorious mystery. But the Mass of the Neophytes, which, formerly, was said during the Night, is now anticipated, as on Easter Eve; so that by today’s Noon, we shall have already begun the praises of the Holy Ghost. The Office of Vespers, in the afternoon, will solemnly open the grand Festival.

https://sensusfidelium.us/the-liturgical-year-dom-prosper-gueranger/easter/saturday-the-vigil-of-pentecost/

Whit Ember Days (This Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday)

As our readers may recall, the Ember Days are the 3 penitential days in the 1962 calendar, occurring at the beginning of each season, that offer thanksgiving and prayers for holiness in the upcoming season.  This week is the Whit Ember Days for the summer season and occurs on the following dates below.  Though the below fasting/partial abstinence days are now voluntary, with all the sin occurring in the world (and in the Church), it may be worth participating in the traditional fasts if you have not done so before.

  • Whit Ember Wednesday – Wednesday May 26 (fasting, partial abstinence), St. Ann, 6pm Low Mass
  • Whit Ember Friday – Friday May 28 (fasting and since its Friday, complete abstinence from meat), St. Ann, 7am Low Mass; St. Mark 12:30pm Low Mass
  • Whit Ember Saturday – Saturday May 29 (fasting, partial abstinence), no diocesan Latin Masses in Charlotte currently scheduled.

The “Whit Ember” days are named after Whit Sunday (“white”), which was an ancient name for Pentecost Sunday and the robes worn by catechumens that day. To learn more about the Whit Ember days visit: https://www.fisheaters.com/customseastertide8.html

Upcoming Latin Masses

  • Feast of Corpus Christi with Eucharistic Procession – Thursday June 3, 7pm (St. Thomas Aquinas parish): The Thursday after Trinity Sunday is the traditional feast of Corpus Christi. St. Thomas Aquinas will offer a High Mass with chant and polyphony, followed by a Eucharistic Procession. It is always a blessing have the Eucharistic Procession on the actual feast day.  We will post any other Corpus Christi Masses as they are announced.
  • Feast of the Sacred Heart – Friday June 11, 7pm (St. Ann parish): St. Ann parish will offer its annual orchestral Latin Mass with the Carolina Catholic Chorale for this sublime feast day (Friday June 11 at 7pm).
  • Feasts of Ss. Peter and Paul – Tuesday June 29, 7pm (Cathedral of St. Patrick): The Cathedral of St. Patrick will offer its annual Traditional Latin Mass on the great feast of Ss. Peter & Paul on Tuesday June 29 at 7pm. It will be with the Cathedral Choir and feature Missa Brevis in E minor by Carl Heinrich Biber.

Art work of the Ascension

Last Sunday, Fr. Reid preached on how sacred art (as many know, a topic dear to his heart) can teach us about the mystery of the Ascension. The first paintings of this mystery started in the early 5th Century (~400 AD) – and since that time all Ascension painting follows the same template. The Ascension template feature two zones of composition: An upper heavenly zone (Christ rising up to heaven), and a finite/lower earthly zone that depicts various members of the Church. Father recommended two paintings specifically that demonstrate this mystery clearly:

Latin Mass & Traditional News

On the Marian Nature of the Extraordinary Form by Fr. Matthew MacDonald: An interesting article on how the Traditional Latin Mass, through its silence, kneeling, etc. fosters the same receptivity that Our Blessed mother had and can help the faithful grow in holiness: https://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2021/05/on-marian-nature-of-extraordinary-form.html

The Eastertide Collects in the Post-Vatican II Missal: A Problematic Reform: Occasionally, debates over the differences between the Novus Ordo and Traditional Latin Masses occur at a vague level, where generalizations are made without supporting documentation.  Understandably so, but it does help to provide that information when it presents itself. In an article on Rorate Caeli we find that opportunity.  Dr. Peter Kwasniewski and Dr. Lauren Pristas examine how few of the Eastertide Collects of the Traditional Latin Mass were actually used for the Eastertide Collects in the Novus Ordo and instead many Novus Ordo collects were simply created (out of thin air?) with little or no connection to liturgical tradition. The scholars go through both the 1962 (TLM) and 2008 (NO) Missals to give a comparative analysis. It’s lengthy but a good “deep dive” for those wanting to take a closer examination:
https://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2021/05/the-eastertide-collects-in-post-vatican.html

How Can the Latin Mass Be Enchanting? – by Kelly Henson: Lastly, we wanted to share an superb column featured in this Friday’s edition of the diocesan newspaper, the Catholic News Herald. Ms. Henson, who has started to attend the Traditional Latin Mass at Our Lady of Grace in Greensboro, wrote about her experience and how she became “enchanted” with the Mass of Ages. Her quote magnificently sums up what many of us have encountered:

After several month of attending Latin Mass, I no longer felt like a disconnected member of an audience watching an intricate and foreign ritual. The Latin words became familiar. Each shift in the chant became a harbinger of a new liturgical season and mood. Most importantly, I felt that with fewer demands on my outward participation, I could readily weave in and out of personal conversation with Jesus as the movement of the Mass carried my heart along its currents. The height of prayer is contemplation, and the atmosphere of a Latin Mass makes room for that quiet, personal gaze between us and Christ to exist.

https://catholicnewsherald.com/viewpoints/104-news/viewpoints/7114-kelly-henson-how-can-latin-mass-be-enchanting

With that profound quote, we ask: What Mass are you attending on Sundays?

Sunday After Ascension

Laudetur Iesus Christus! Today is the Sunday after Ascension, and the 4th day within the octave of the Ascension (sadly, suppressed after 1955). We include Dr. Mike Foley’s commentary on today’s propers: http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/05/the-contextual-orations-of-sunday-after.html

Below is a schedule of upcoming Masses and events:

St. Ann Respect Life Latin Mass – Saturday May 22 at 8am: St. Ann parish will host its 4th Saturday Respect Life Latin Mass at 8am, followed by prayers at Planned Parenthood (or a Holy Hour in the church).

Next Juventutem Event – Saturday May 22nd: Juventutem, the young adults group (18-35, married or single) centered around the Traditional Latin Mass will hold its next event on Saturday May 22nd at 8am it will be the attending the 4th Saturday Respect Life Latin Mass (8am) at St. Ann followed by prayers at Planned Parenthood.

Feast of the Sacred Heart – Friday June 11, 7pm (St. Ann parish): St. Ann parish will offer its annual orchestral Latin Mass for this sublime feast day (Friday June 11 at 7pm).

Feasts of Ss. Peter and Paul – Tuesday June 29, 7pm (Cathedral of St. Patrick):  We are pleased to announce the Cathedral will offer its annual Traditional Latin Mass on the great feast of Ss. Peter & Paul on Tuesday June 29 at 7pm. It will be with the Carolina Catholic Chorale and feature  Missa Brevis in E minor by Carl Heinrich Biber.

St. Peter of Verona Palms now at St. Thomas Aquinas parish: If you attend the 11:30am Sunday Latin Mass at St. Thomas Aquinas and have not received a St. Peter of Verona Blessed Palm kit yet (or in prior years), please stop by the Latin Mass info table there today, while quantities last. These palms when buried on your property can, according to Church tradition, protect against natural disasters.

Traditional Days of Fasting During Ascensiontide & Pentecost

As many of our readers know, in the Traditional Latin Mass of 1962, there are several additional days of fasting and penance throughout the year (now just optional). Typically the day before a major feast day (Assumption, Pentecost, Ascension, Nativity) was a vigil day and a day of fasting and partial abstinence, with meat only permitted once per day. Additionally, as our readers may recall, the Ember Days, the 3 penitential days at the beginning of each season that offer thanksgiving and prayers for holiness, were the other periods of penance outside of Lent or Advent.  For the remainder of this month, we have several of these optional days occurring. Though the below fasting/partial abstinence days are now voluntary, with all the sin occurring in the world (and in the Church), it may be worth participating in the traditional fasts if you have not done so before.

  • Vigil of Pentecost – Saturday May 22 (fasting, partial abstinence)
  • Whit Ember Wednesday – Wednesday May 26 (fasting, partial abstinence)
  • Whit Ember Friday – Friday May 28 (fasting and since its Friday, complete abstinence from meat)
  • Whit Ember Saturday – Saturday May 29 (fasting, partial abstinence)

The “Whit Ember” days are named after Whit Sunday (“white”), which was an ancient name for Pentecost Sunday. Hence the Pentecost Ember Days. To learn more about the Whit Ember days visit: https://www.fisheaters.com/customseastertide8.html

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • Abp. Viganò: Catholic Clergy Should Humbly “Recognize the Deception” of Vatican II and Embrace Tradition: Suggested by a CLMC reader, Archbishop Viganò examines the current state of liturgical affairs in the Church, and says only the Traditional Latin Mass is the “perfect voice” of the Church. The archbishop looks forward to the full restoration of the One Catholic Rite (The Traditional Latin Mass) and the abolition of the “imperfect voice” of the post conciliar version of the Mass. CLMC note: Each Sunday, we see this taking shape as new families make the choice to attend the Traditional Latin Mass:  
    https://catholicfamilynews.com/blog/2021/05/07/abp-vigano-catholic-clergy-should-humbly-recognize-the-deception-of-vatican-ii-and-embrace-tradition/
  • Tyranny and sexual abuse in the Catholic Church: A Jesuit tragedy: During COVID, we often read or heard clergy saying they had to “follow orders” or be “obedient” to a bishop or governor on strange protocols that were clearly outside the scope and authority of state or even Church. How could this even happen? Though there is legitimate authority and obedience in the Church (and state), it does have limits and as John Lamont explains in this 2018 piece, a type of erroneous hyper-obedience developed in the Jesuit order in the 1500s, and crept its way into the rest of the Church. It was seen much during the sexual abuse crisis (and reared its head again during COVID). While one may want to put COVID crisis behind, unless “hyper-obedience” is corrected to the traditional Church teaching on obedience, this will likely occur again in some form or fashion:
    https://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2018/10/tyranny-and-sexual-abuse-in-catholic.html

May 15, 2021: 130th Anniversary of the Landmark Encyclical Rerum Novarum

“Laws only bind when they are in accordance with right reason, and, hence, with the eternal law of God.” – Pope Leo XIII, May 15, 1891

Lastly, speaking of obeying laws in accord with right reason, the preceding quote is an appropriate way to commemorate yesterday’s 130th anniversary of the landmark encyclical Rerum Novarum, written by Pope Leo XIII on May 15, 1891. Rerum Novarum represents just the tip of traditional Catholic social doctrine, which is an important component in restoring Christendom (the other component is restoring the Traditional Latin Mass as Archbishop Viganò states above).

Often times, the modernists try to promote a false social doctrine called Catholic “social justice”, which is often just a mix of Marxism, leftists politics and volunteerism. True justice in society comes from applying the traditional and perennial Church social teachings, that were especially summarized and pronounced by Popes Leo XIII and Pope Pius XI. Two books that contain their writings are:

Rorate Caeli has an excellent summary of Rerum Novarum’s points in light of the lockdowns, etc.: https://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2021/05/130th-anniversary-of-rerum-novarum-laws.html

We will just quote two lines of the encyclical and ask two questions below:

Socialists, therefore, by endeavoring to transfer the possessions of individuals to the community at large, strike at the interests of every wage-earner, since they would deprive him of the liberty of disposing of his wages, and thereby of all hope and possibility of increasing his resources and of bettering his condition in life.

Man precedes the State, and possesses, prior to the formation of any State, the right of providing for the substance of his body.

CLMC note: What could have happened (or been averted) over the past year if Church leaders had access to the traditional Catholic social teachings and properly denounced the COVID lockdowns? What is still possible if bishops and priests learn the traditional teachings and apply it to the socialists’ next move – especially with “vaccine passports” looming on the horizon?

The authentic Catholic social teachings are a gift to the faithful in times like these.

5th Sunday After Easter (Ascension Week)

Christus Resurréxit! Resurréxit Vere! Sunday is the 5th Sunday after Easter, and as custom we provide Dr. Mike Foley’s commentary on Sunday’s Collect and propers: http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/05/the-school-of-love-in-orations-of-fifth.html

Ascension Thursday Latin Masses – Thursday May 13

Although not a holy day of obligation in most dioceses (sadly), Ascension Thursday May 13 is indeed celebrated in the Traditional Latin Mass calendar on its actual date (40th day after Easter). As such, the following parishes will be offering Traditional Latin Masses on Thursday May 13:

  • St. Thomas Aquinas, 7pm (High) (Fatima procession before Mass at 6:00pm)
  • Our Lady of Grace, Greensboro 7pm (Low)
  • St. John the Baptist, Tryon, 6:30pm (High) (Fatima Procession to follow at 7:30pm)
  • St. Elizabeth of the Hill Country, Boone 9:30am (Low)

Note: St. Ann will not be offering an Ascension Thursday Latin Mass this year; however, it will be offering the Vigil of the Ascension Low Mass on Wednesday May 12 at 6pm. This is not an “anticipatory” Mass like the Novus Ordo/English. Rather in the Traditional Latin Mass, major feast days were preceded by a special preparatory days called vigils, to spiritually prepare for the major feast. It was usually accompanied by fasting (see note below) and partial abstinence. 

History of Ascension: Please also see the end of this post for some background on the importance of Ascension Thursday.

St. Mark Latin Mass time change for Friday May 14 (12:15pm Special Mass Time)

For Friday May 14th only, the St. Mark Friday Latin Mass will start at 12:15pm (not 12:30pm) to allow the 8th grade class to attend Mass on this day. It will return to a normal 12:30pm schedule the following Friday. Please adjust your schedule accordingly.

Traditional Days of Fasting During Ascension & Pentecost Weeks

As many of our readers know, in the Traditional Latin Mass of 1962, there are several additional days of fasting and penance throughout the year (now just optional). Typically the day before a major feast day (Assumption, Pentecost, Ascension, Nativity) was a vigil day, a day of fasting and partial abstinence, with meat only permitted once per day. Additionally, as our readers may recall, the Ember Days, the 3 penitential days at the beginning of each season that offer thanksgiving and prayers for holiness, were the other periods of penance.  For May 2021, we have all those days occurring in a two week period this month. Though the fasting/partial abstinence are now voluntary, with all the sin occurring in the world (and in the Church), it may be worth participating in the traditional fasts if you have not done so before.

All days below were traditionally fasting and partial abstinence (meat at only 1 meal) unless otherwise noted:

  • Vigil of Ascension – Wednesday May 12
  • Vigil of Pentecost – Saturday May 22
  • Whit Ember Wednesday – Wednesday May 26
  • Whit Ember Friday – Friday May 28 (fasting and complete abstinence from meat)
  • Whit Ember Saturday – Saturday May 29

The “Whit Ember” days are named after Whit Sunday (“white”), which was an ancient name for Pentecost Sunday. Hence the Pentecost Ember Days. To learn more about the Whit Ember days visit:
https://www.fisheaters.com/customseastertide8.html

Minor Rogation Days this Monday – Wednesday

As we noted a few weeks ago, the Monday through Wednesday of Ascension week are minor rogation days, a once penitential day(s) where the Church implores God’s protection and aid against natural disasters. Traditionally a blessing of fields would occur on this day as well. We are not aware of any parishes offering minor Rogation Masses. If we do, we will let you know.  Please see our post from a few weeks ago on the Rogation Masses:
https://charlottelatinmass.org/2021/04/24/rogation-day-3rd-sunday-after-easter/

St. Ann Respect Life Latin Mass – Saturday May 22 at 8am

St. Ann parish will host its 4th Saturday Respect Life Latin Mass at 8am, followed by prayers at Planned Parenthood (or a Holy Hour in the church).

Next Juventutem Event – Saturday May 22nd

Juventutem, the young adults group (18-35, married or single) centered around the Traditional Latin Mass will hold its next event on Saturday May 22nd at 8am it will be the attending the 4th Saturday Respect Life Latin Mass (8am) at St. Ann followed by prayers at Planned Parenthood.

Feast of the Sacred Heart – Friday June 11, 7pm (**NOW AT ST. ANN PARISH**)

We previously announced the Cathedral was offering its annual Traditional Latin Mass for the feast of the Sacred Heart. However, St. Ann parish already scheduled to offer its annual orchestral Latin Mass for this sublime feast day (Friday June 11 at 7pm). Hence the annual Latin Mass at the Cathedral will be moved to another later in June (see below announcement). All are invited to attend St. Ann for the Traditional Latin Mass for feast of the Sacred Heart at 7pm.

SAVE THE DATE: Feasts of Ss. Peter and Paul – Tuesday June 29, 7pm (Cathedral of St. Patrick)

We are pleased to announce the Cathedral has rescheduled its annual Traditional Latin Mass to the great feast of Ss. Peter & Paul on Tuesday June 29 at 7pm. It will be with the Carolina Catholic Chorale and feature  Missa Brevis in E minor by Carl Heinrich Biber.

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • Modesty Announcement at St. Ann:  Several ladies of the CLMC wanted to publically express their thanks to Fr. Reid for his gentle reminder about the importance of dressing modesty at St. Ann parish in last Sunday’s bulletin.  We also note that a new sign denoting the parish’s modesty reminder is posted in the narthex which we encourage all to read. Below is Fr. Reid’s message:

    As our weather begins to warm up, please be attentive to dressing modestly for Mass. Attending Mass is the most important thing we do each week, and the way we dress should reflect this. When we come to Mass, we are coming to visit our Lord, and thus we should be dressed appropriately. Thus, as your pastor I respectfully ask you to refrain from wearing shorts, t-shirts, short skirts, low-cut or revealing clothing at Mass. Moreover, clothing that is revealing or very tightly fitting can be a distraction to your fellow parishioners. So out of respect to our Lord, and in charity to your fellow parishioners, please be modest when selecting your clothes for Mass. I appreciate your attention to this important matter.
  • The Winegrowers of Heaven: Between Rhône and Provence: Several months ago we shared a video about the traditional Benedictine Monks in La Barroux, France who produce wine using an ancient practice. A few weeks ago they were featured in another publication discussing their vineyards which may be of interest:
    https://aleteia.org/2021/04/30/the-winegrowers-of-heaven-between-the-rhone-and-provence/
    • To learn more about the Benedictine Monks of Abbey of Saint Madeleine du Barroux (who offer the Latin Mass exclusively) please visit: https://www.barroux.org/en/
    • If you would like to purchase their wine, please visit their U.S. distributors website: https://www.viacaritatis.us/
    • CLMC note: One can only imagine the spiritual power of traditional cloistered monks working the fields and valleys of Western North Carolina. Not only do these monks offer prayer and sacrifice, but their traditional way of life has the potential to convert many non-Catholics who have never seen “lifestyles” consecrated to God while working the land. As we’ve noted before, this diocese has great potential but has not yet “arrived” at maturity until it is dotted with many cloisters, convents, and monasteries. A diocese with cloistered religious offering daily pray, penances and sacrifices, is much more prepared not only to weather the spiritual war that lies ahead in our turbulent times, but to win it by converting the entire region to Catholicism.
  • 104th Anniversary of the Apparition of Our Lady of Fatima: Thursday is not only Ascension Thursday, but marks the 104th anniversary of Our Lady of Fatima’s first appearance to the children at Fatima. We include an important article from Fr. Linus Clovis, with Voice of the Family, a traditional pro-family organization in Europe. Fr. Clovis offers a traditional perspective on the Fatima message which we encourage all to read: https://voiceofthefamily.com/the-reform-of-our-lives-requested-at-fatima/
  • The Apparition of St. Michael the Archangel: Yesterday, Saturday May 8, was the ancient feast of Apparition of St. Michael the Archangel, who appeared at a cave in Italy in the 6th century. This site is now a basilica dedicated in his honor, and the rocks of the cave serve as his relics.  Note: This is a different feast day than the principal feast of Michalmas on September 29. Please see this excellent article from New Liturgical Movement: http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/05/the-apparition-of-st-michael.html

The Importance of Ascension Thursday

According to the book, The Golden Legend, the extensive tome on the lives of the saints, written by Blessed Jacobus de Voragine, a 13th century archbishop of Genoa, Ascension Thursday was considered so solemn a feast day in the early Church that Thursdays were a second holy day of the week like Sundays. Its importance was diminished in later times after increasing pressure to open up Thursdays for other feast days. Sadly, in our own times, the actual Ascension Thursday was further diminished, having its octave removed, and now, rarely celebrated on its proper day in the Novus Ordo, it is transferred to Sundays in most dioceses. As such Ascension Thursday is rarely made a holy day of obligation with the exception of a few archdioceses.

According to the great 19th century Benedictine liturgist Dom Prosper Gueranger OSB, the original Ascension Day in 33 AD began with the disciples in the cenacle (upper room), when Our Lord appeared to them, shared a meal, and instructed them. At this point, he exhorts them to ‘Go ye into the whole world, and preach the Gospel to every creature. He that believeth and is baptized, shall be saved: but he that believeth not, shall be condemned.’ (Mark 16:15-16)  He then asks them to stay in Jerusalem until they receive the Holy Ghost.Gueranger notes:

Here, then, we have men unknown to the world and devoid of every human means, and yet commissioned to conquer the earth and make it acknowledge Jesus as its King! The world ignores their very existence. Tiberius, who sits on the imperial throne, trembling at every shadow of conspiracy, little suspects that there is being prepared an expedition which is to conquer the Roman empire. But these warriors must have their armour, and the armour must be of heaven’s own tempering. Jesus tells them that they are to receive it a few days hence.

Gueranger continues with the solemn procession from the cenacle to the Mount of Olives:

Jesus rises: His blessed Mother, and the hundred and twenty persons assembled there, prepare to follow Him. The cenacle is situated on Mount Sion, which is one of the two hills within the walls of Jerusalem. The holy group traverses the city, making for the eastern gate, which opens on the valley of Josaphat. It is the last time that Jesus walks through the faithless city. He is invisible to the eyes of the people who denied. Him, but visible to His disciples, and goes before them, as heretofore the pillar of fire led on the Israelites. How beautiful and imposing a sight! Mary, the disciples, and the holy women accompanying Jesus in His heavenward journey, which is to lead Him to the right hand of His eternal Father! It was commemorated in the middle ages by a solemn procession before the Mass of Ascension day.

To read the rest of this entry, please see Dom Prosper Gueranger, OSB; The Liturgical Year: https://sensusfidelium.us/the-liturgical-year-dom-prosper-gueranger/easter/the-ascension/

Lastly, the site of Ascension was also important and Gueranger noted in another entry (likely the 9th Sunday after Pentecost) during the fall of Jerusalem in 70 AD when Titus’ troops were encamped on the Mount of Olives ready to lay siege to the city, that Divine Providence, protected the site of the Ascension from the damage normally caused by the heavy Roman war machinery (horses, chariots, troops, etc.). Today, the site still remains, although it is part of a Mosque, but pilgrims can still visit the site and touch the imprint of Our Lord’s feet left on the rock during his ascent.

Below are few pictures taken from the Ascension “chapel” – the footprint still can be seen if one looks closely.

4th Sunday After Easter

Christus Resurréxit! Resurréxit Vere! Sunday is the 4th Sunday after Easter, and as custom we share a reflection on Sunday’s Collect by Dr. Mike Foley: http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/04/the-school-of-love-in-collect-for.html

Sacred Heart Latin Mass resumes today at 3pm

After a 14th month hiatus, the 1st Sunday Traditional Latin Mass returns to Sacred Heart parish in Salisbury (45 minutes north of Charlotte) and at a new time of 3pm. Fr. Robert Ferguson, FSSP will be visiting and offering the Mass.

St. Peter of Verona Palms at St. Ann today (12:30pm Mass)

Thursday was the feast of St. Peter of Verona, and as many readers know, there is an ancient custom in the traditional rite to bless palms on his feast day. Tradition holds when the palms are buried around the 4 corners of one’s property, they protect against natural disasters. Father Jones has kindly blessed the palms and we will be handing out these our Latin Mass welcome table after Mass while quantities last. Please note: If you already received one in prior years, you do not need a new one year (unless you moved). We also thank Fr. Jones for taking the time to bless the palms. To learn more about St. Peter of Verona visit: https://charlottelatinmass.org/2021/04/29/feasts-of-ss-peter-of-verona-and-joseph-the-workman/
(also see our note about Blessed Carino, St. Peter’s assassin below)

Farewell to the Hren Family

A few weeks ago we said farewell to one of the Latin Mass families, the Carters as they moved out west. Now, we are sad to announce that the Hren family (Joshua, Brittany and children) will be moving back home to the Midwest soon.  Needless to say, the Hrens have shared with us that it is not easy to leave St. Ann’s Latin Mass community, which as they kindly note is filled with not a few holy souls–people whose lives exude charity and total commitedness to Christ. The Hrens say: Thank you all, from our hearts, for striving after holiness and truth.

St. Leo the Great Parish Latin Mass Survey

As mentioned last week, parishioners of St. Leo the Great parish in Winston-Salem are conducting a Latin Mass interest survey to see if there is interest in a Latin Mass at that parish.  They are collecting information to establish the level of interest.  If you are interested, please fill out this survey: https://forms.gle/d1YociePCZvF6YUS7

Fr. Barone’s Latin Institute Update and Request for Help

As you may have read the other week, Fr. Barone’s new Latin Institute, Veterum Sapientia Institute is up and running and he wanted to share an update and ask for help. To learn more visit: https://charlottelatinmass.org/2021/04/14/latin-institute-update/ 

Latin Mass & Traditional News

  • Conversion of St. Peter of Verona’s Assassin: As noted earlier, Thursday April 29 was the feast of St. Peter of Verona, a 13 century Dominican who was martyred for defending the faith against heresy in Italy. However, there is actually more to the story. Like many saints, St. Peter’s martyrdom resulted in the conversion of his assassin, who is now beatified. To learn more about this story visit: http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/04/blessed-carino-assassin-of-st-peter.html
  • The Legend of St. Philip the Apostle: Interesting piece on the history of St. Philip in the liturgy and the legend of him banishing a dragon: http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/05/the-legend-of-st-philip-apostle.html

    Side note on dragons: Dragons appear periodically in Sacred Scripture – Daniel 14:22; Job 40:10 – yet what are they? One possibility is that they were actually dinosaurs. From a traditional Catholic perspective, this should not be surprising, as all animals were created on the 6th day of creation – hours before Adam was formed, and later were likely placed on Noe’s ark and survived the flood (though now extinct). St. George is frequently depicted as slaying a dragon in the 4th century AD. What was the dragon he slayed? For more on this topic visit:
    https://www.kolbecenter.org/historical-evidence-for-dinosaur-and-human-co-existence/)
  • How Liturgical “Forms” Concretely Define Religious Belief — or Undermine It: Dr. Peter Kwasniewski writes a helpful piece in understanding the differences in theology between the Traditional Latin Mass and Novus Ordo. He also noted something that we had noted few weeks ago regarding COVID and the two “forms” of the Roman Rite:

    The pandemic has only accelerated the already glaring differences between the traditional practice of Catholicism and its modern substitute. The loss of faith evidenced statistically is understandable, even predictable, given that the main catechism for most Catholics is the Mass. A concerted return to the traditional liturgy is not simply beneficial but necessary for the continued life of our churches. Bishops who do not grasp this in time will preside over the white-chasubled funerals of their cremated dioceses [emphasis added].

    http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/04/how-liturgical-forms-concretely-define.html

Pro-Life Update

  • Federal Government caught purchasing aborted fetal remains: As noted above, the differences between traditional Catholicism and modernist/Novus Ordo Catholicism have become apparent during COVID but also over the debate over abortion linked “vaccines”, more properly called COVID-19 experimental injections. The modernists claim that abortion linked vaccines are “morally permissible” because the connection between the recipient and the original abortion are distant. We’ve covered in prior posts how, according to traditional teaching of the Church, this is simply insufficient and at variance with the Church’s perennial teachings. However, evidence is now growing that the link between abortion fetal tissue and medical research is much closer than previously claimed. These disturbing articles should be a tragic reminder that Church leaders should take a closer look at the evidence and science, and trust in the traditional teachings of the Church:  
  1. Federal Government Caught Buying ‘Fresh’ Flesh Of Aborted Babies Who Could Have Survived As Preemies: https://thefederalist.com/2021/04/15/federal-government-caught-buying-fresh-flesh-of-aborted-babies-who-could-have-survived-as-preemies/
  2. Top 10 Sickening Details About How Federal Employees Trafficked Baby Body Parts: https://thefederalist.com/2021/04/26/top-10-sickening-details-about-how-federal-employees-trafficked-baby-body-parts/
  • Support NC House Bill 588: Opposing Vaccine “Passports (Contact your Rep): While some Catholics have offered confusing statements over abortion linked vaccines, the Church has been clear over the years, that vaccines or similar treatments must never be mandatory. Regrettably the health dictatorship in DC and in North Carolina are exploring ways to allow the private sector to mandate the COVID-19 injections in order to participate in society (schools, shopping, etc.) 

    Thankfully though, NC Representative Keith Kidwell has introduced legislation to ban such draconian measures. To learn how to take action on House Bill 588, please the Carolina Pro-Life Action Network’s webpage: https://www.prolifecharlotte.org/oppose-vaccine-passports/

    *C-PLAN’s page also includes Church statements on mandatory vaccines

The Ottaviani Intervention: What is it?

For some deeper weekend reading on the crisis in the Church, we wanted to recommend The Ottaviani Intervention. One may ask – what is it exactly? It’s named after Cardinal Alfredo Ottaviani, a senior Vatican prelate, who served as the Prefect of the Holy Office from 1959 – 1968, now known as the Congregation of Doctrine and Faith – the Holy See’s main “agency” with overseeing and safeguarding the deposit of faith. After his retirement, as the Novus Ordo Mass was being finalized, and he and another Cardinal, formed a theological review of the Novus Ordo Missal and examined whether it maintained continuity with the Mass of Pius V, otherwise known as the Tridentine Mass or the Traditional Latin Mass. His review, sent to Pope Paul VI in 1969 said:

  • [T]he Novus Ordo represents, both as a whole and in its details, a striking departure from the Catholic theology of the Mass as it was formulated in Session XXII of the Council of Trent.
  • Recent reforms have amply demonstrated that fresh changes in the liturgy could lead to nothing but complete bewilderment on the part of the faithful who are already showing signs of restiveness and of an indubitable lessening of faith.
  • Therefore we most earnestly beseech Your Holiness […] not to deprive us of the possibility of continuing to have recourse to the fruitful integrity of that Missale Romanum of St. Pius V, so highly praised by Your Holiness and so deeply loved and venerated by the whole Catholic world.

Ottaviani Intervention: https://lms.org.uk/ottaviani-intervention

Are we not seeing, with the modernist theological statements of today, the “complete bewilderment on the part of the faithful” today? Lex orandi, lex credendi: What we pray (e.g. the Mass), is what we believe. What Mass are you attending on Sundays?

Feasts of Ss. Peter of Verona and Joseph the Workman

Christus Resurréxit! Resurréxit Vere! Blessed feast of St. Peter of Verona, a 13th century Dominican Friar and martyr whose the Church commemorates today.  A disciple of St. Dominic, Pope Gregory IX appointed St. Peter as a general inquisitor to combat the Manichean heresy, and St. Peter defended the faith across Italy through his preaching. He was martyred in 1252.  

7pm High Mass tonight – St. Thomas Aquinas parish: St. Thomas Aquinas will offer the normal 7pm High Mass on Thursday April 29 for this great saint’s feast day.

Blessing of St. Peter of Verona Palms

In the Traditional Rite, there is an ancient custom to honor St. Peter by having palm leaves blessed in his honor.  Tradition holds that when these blessed palm leaves are made into crosses and buried in the four corners of one’s property, they are to guard against natural disasters. To learn more about the patron saint of inquisitors, visit: http://reginamag.com/saint-peter-of-verona-martyr/  

Blessed Palm Kits Available: As custom each April 29, the CLMC has arranged to have palms blessed (by Fr. Jones this year) to be distributed to the faithful so the palms can be buried in one’s property. We will have those kits available this Sunday May 2nd at our Latin Mass info table before or after the 12:30pm St. Ann Latin Mass. Feel free to pick them up while quantities last. Note: If you already have the St. Peter palms from prior years, you do not need new ones.

Saturday May 1 – Feast of St. Joseph the Workman

This Saturday is not only first Saturday, but also the feast of St. Joseph the Workman, a more recent feast, instituted by Pope Pius XII to counter the communist May Day “celebrations”. Since our country (and our Church?) is now facing a socialist/Marxist takeover from a health dictatorship, is there not a better time to Ite Ad Joseph (Go to Joseph), the patron saint against communism and socialism, and ask for his intercession?

–         10am High Mass on Saturday at St. Thomas Aquinas: As custom, St. Thomas Aquinas will offer its regular 10am High Mass for this glorious feast day.

–         History of St. Joseph the Workman: We share an article by Dr. Mike Foley on this important feast day:
http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/04/the-feast-of-saint-joseph-worker.html

–         Divini Redemptoris (On Atheistic Communism): In 1937, Pope Pius XI issued an encyclical proclaiming St. Joseph the patron against Communism. Learn more here:

o   To hasten the advent of that “peace of Christ in the kingdom of Christ”[48] so ardently desired by all, We place the vast campaign of the Church against world Communism under the standard of St. Joseph, her mighty Protector.

o   http://www.vatican.va/content/pius-xi/en/encyclicals/documents/hf_p-xi_enc_19370319_divini-redemptoris.html

Plenary Indulgence for May 1 – Year of St. Joseph:

With 2021 being the year of St. Joseph, the Church offers a plenary on certain days of the year – including the feast of St. Jospeh the Workman on May 1st. To learn more visit the diocese’s Year of St. Joseph website to learn the conditions: https://yearofstjoseph.org/indulgences/

Blessing of Religious Objects – after 10am First Saturday Latin Mass at St. Thomas Aquinas

Each 1st Saturday, after the 10am Latin Mass, priests at St. Thomas Aquinas parish in Charlotte will be available to bless any religious objects – including objects that may require a unique blessing, such with as holy salt. 

SAVE THE DATE: Friday June 11, 7pm – Traditional Latin Mass at the Cathedral

We shared this reminder during Lent, but as custom, the Cathedral will again be offering its annual Traditional Latin Mass for the feast of the Sacred Heart. The Cathedral will offer a High (possibly Solemn High) at 7pm that evening.

Rogation Mass Recap: Lastly, we wanted to express our thanks to St. Thomas Aquinas pastor, Fr. Matthew Codd for offering a Rogation Mass and Procession at the last minute. The liturgy and procession were beautiful as you can imagine. As we mentioned last weekend, the Rogation Mass was instituted by Pope St. Gregory the Great for deliverance from a plague.  Please consider offering a decade of your Rosary for Fr. Codd.  The pictures were also picked up by the New Liturgical Movement blog, which we share with you here:

–         Tradition is for the Young – Rogation Photopost 2021: http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/04/tradition-is-for-young-rogation.html

Is this Rogation Mass not the most “morally acceptable” approach – petitioning God – to be saved from any illness outbreak, instead of placing hope in a morally compromised man-made abortion-linked injection?

Rogation Day (3rd Sunday After Easter)

Christus Resurréxit! Resurréxit Vere! Sunday April 25 is the 3rd Sunday after Easter, and as custom we provide Dr. Mike Foley’s reflection on the orations for the Mass: http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2021/04/the-joyful-orations-of-third-sunday.html

Major Rogation Day – Sunday April 25 (Tomorrow at St. Thomas Aquinas parish 11:30am)

April 25 is also Major Rogation Day, which, unique to the traditional calendar, is a day instituted of petitions and formerly penances to God to protect against natural disasters and plagues. It comes from the Latin word “rogare” which is to ask or petition. Sometimes it is accompanied by a procession and the chanting of the litany of the saints. There are two types of Rogation days – major and minor. The major day is April 25, Roman in origin, and was established by Pope St. Gregory the Great in 590 A.D. for deliverance from plagues as Fisheaters.com notes

“Rogation” comes from the Latin “rogare,” which means “to ask,” and Rogation Days are days during which we seek to ask God’s mercy, appease His anger, avert the chastisements He makes manifest through natural disasters, and ask for His blessings, particularly with regard to farming, gardening, and other agricultural pursuits. They are set aside to remind us how radically dependent we are on God through His creation, and how prayer can help protect us from nature’s often cruel ways.  Hence, its mood is somber and beseeching; its liturgical color is purple.

https://www.fisheaters.com/customseastertide3.html

Minor Rogation Days: The minor Rogation days come during three days of Ascension week (Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday), and is more ancient than the major Rogation day, and comes from France in the late 5th century as New Liturgical Movement explains: http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2015/05/the-institution-of-rogation-days.html

Rogation Day Latin Mass at St. Thomas Aquinas – Sunday April 25: While some parishes will be offering the Latin Mass for the 3rd Sunday After Easter, St. Thomas Aquinas will be offering their regular 11:30am Latin Mass this Sunday for the Major Rogation day. If you attend, please consider uniting your Mass intentions with the Rogation petitions.

N.B. Fr. Christopher Smith, who offers the Traditional Latin Mass at Prince of Peace parish in Taylors, SC (Two hours southwest of Charlotte) has compiled an extensive but wonderful explanation of the Rogation and Ember Days in the Traditional Rite. You can download it here: http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2019/04/rogation-and-ember-days-illustrated.html

St. Peter of Verona & Blessing Palms – Thursday April 29

We are pleased to share that this Thursday April 29 is the feast of St. Peter Martyr or St. Peter of Verona, a 13th century Dominican Friar.  A disciple of St. Dominic, Pope Gregory IX appointed St. Peter as a general inquisitor to combat the Manichean heresy, and St. Peter defended the faith across Italy through his preaching. He was martyred in 1252.   In the Traditional Rite, there is an ancient custom to honor St. Peter by having palm leaves blessed in his honor.  Tradition holds that when these blessed palm leaves are made into crosses and buried in the four corners of one’s property, they are to guard against natural disasters. To learn more about the patron saint of inquisitors, visit: http://reginamag.com/saint-peter-of-verona-martyr/  

  • Blessed Palm Kits Available: As custom each April 29, the CLMC has arranged to have palms blessed (by Fr. Jones this year) to be distributed to the faithful so the palms can be buried in one’s property. We will have those kits available next Sunday May 2nd at our Latin Mass info table before or after the 12:30pm Latin Mass. Feel free to pick them up while quantities last. Note: If you already have them from prior years, you do not need new ones.
  • 7pm Latin Mass for St. Peter Verona: St. Thomas Aquinas will offer the normal 7pm High Mass on Thursday April 29 for this great saint’s feast day.

Latin Mass Interest Survey at St. Leo the Great in Winston-Salem

We are pleased to share that a Latin Mass interest survey is now circulating at the beautiful St. Leo’s parish in Winston-Salem. Specifically, there is a group at St. Leo the Great Catholic Church in Winston-Salem who are exploring the possibility of petitioning for a Traditional Latin Mass at their church. They are collecting information to establish the level of interest.  If you are interested, please fill out this survey: https://forms.gle/d1YociePCZvF6YUS7

Latin Mass history: We also note that in February 1985, St. Leo the Great hosted the 1st diocesan supported Latin Mass (since 1970) after Pope St. John Paul II’s 1984 indult granted worldwide access for Traditional Latin Masses  – albeit with a bishop’s permission.  The CLMC’s predecessor, the Society of Traditional Roman Catholics explains in their newsletter which you can view here: https://charlottelatinmass.files.wordpress.com/2021/04/strc-feb-1985-newsletter.pdf

Fr. Barone’s Latin Institute Update and Request for Help

As you may have read the other week, Fr. Barone’s new Latin Institute is up and running and he wanted to share an update and ask for help:

The Veterum Sapientia Institute, founded in Charlotte this past November, is up and running, serving the Church in the promotion of her sacred languages of Latin and Greek. Since November, VSI successfully concluded its first quarter of online classes.

It gives me great pleasure to announce that several traditional communities are utilizing our classes. The spring quarter will begin this week. Registration is still open, including a Latin class for beginners who seek to use learn Latin as language (listening comprehension and speaking). Word about VSI is getting out, too. The Sensus Fidelium podcast interviewed me in January. Articles have also appeared about VSI in Inside the Vatican and the Traditionalist magazines. Lastly, VSI is nearing an agreement with the Pontifical Institute for Higher Latin in Rome to be able to grant diplomas.

As VSI continues to expand, we seek your assistance. In particular, we’re seeking help from those who have experience in fundraising, even if it is merely offering advice. If you have professional experience in other areas that you think would be of help, please let me know. You’re also welcome to “stimulate” the economy via VSI merchandise or donations (a yellow donation button can be found at the bottom of our website). God reward you!

www.veterumsapientia.org

Latin Mass and Traditional News

  • 1st Sunday Latin Mass Resumes at Sacred Heart Parish in Salisbury (new time of 3pm): After an 13 month hiatus, beginning Sunday May 2nd at 3pm, the 1st Sunday monthly Latin Mass at Sacred Heart parish resumes; however it will be at a new permanent time slot of 3pm (instead of 4:30pm). This change will allow visiting priests to return to their home parish for any liturgies (e.g. Vespers or Mass). For more information contact Mark Hartley with the Salisbury Latin Mass Community: info@salisburylmc.org
  • Fr. Ripperger Interview With Taylor Marshall – Is the Traditional Latin Mass is Superior to the Novus Ordo?: For those of us who attend the TLM regularly, we’ve known that the Mass of Ages is better than the Novus Ordo for many reasons. Noted exorcist and theologian, Fr. Chad Ripperger (who offers the TLM exclusively) actually goes into how it’s spiritually superior to the Novus Ordo. In short, you get what you pray for:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?app=desktop&v=QUpsrW90uGQ

As we’ve noted last week, and other times in the past, the Traditional Latin Mass contains a theological outlook or perspective of 2,000 years that is vastly different from the new modern theology that accompanies the Novus Ordo Mass and contemporary Catholic “thinking”. These differences are clearly unveiling themselves for all to see during the COVID situation.

What to do? Attend the Traditional Latin Mass, pray the Rosary and learn the Catholic faith as it was taught for nearly 2,000 years. A good start may be reading a traditional book on the faith, like the catechism book that Fr. Ripperger endorses: https://mediatrixpress.com/product/the-catechism-explained-by-fr-spirago/

As Bishop Schneider exhorted us on his 2017 visit: Be Catholic!

Respect Life Mass this Saturday & the Doctrine of Creation

Christus Resurréxit! Resurréxit Vere! Today is the feasts of Ss. Soter and Caius, two Pope-martyrs who lived (and died) during Diocletian’s persecution of the Church. To learn more about these great saints visit Dom Prosper Gueranger’s The Liturgical Year: https://sensusfidelium.us/the-liturgical-year-dom-prosper-gueranger/april/april-22-saints-soter-caius-popes-martyrs/

Respect Life Latin Mass – Saturday April 24, 8:00AM:

Just a reminder that St. Ann will offer its 4th Saturday Respect Life Latin Mass this Saturday at 8am. Mass is typically followed by prayers at the abortion facility (700 S. Torrence Street) or people can pray a Holy Hour of Reparation in the Church (led by a deacon).

Traditional Catholicism vs. Modernism: Earth Day vs. The Doctrine of Creation

Today April 22, the secular world celebrates “Earth Day”, a day which descends into nature worship, under the pretext of “protecting the environment”. This event is typically devoid of God, and the teachings of His Holy Church.  Sadly, some in the Catholic Church are trying to baptize this pagan day and reconcile it with the Catholic faith – yet their efforts are in vain.

There is only one institution that has a full understanding of God’s creation, and how to safeguard it and that is the Catholic Church through her traditional teachings on creation, particularly found in the Book of Genesis. Through a proper understanding of the literal interpretation of Genesis (as taught by the Church fathers, saints, and Popes), Catholics recognize that the Earth and the universe was created in perfect harmony in 6 natural days by God, roughly less than 10,000 years ago (God rested on the 7th day). Adam was created from the slime of the earth, and Eve from his rib; but after Adam and Eve sinned, death and deformity entered into the universe.  However, the key to understanding the scientific processes of today (including climate)  actually lie in the past – specifically with Noe’s flood.

Noe’s Flood: The true occurrence of “climate change”

Roughly 1,650 years after Adam and Eve’s expulsion from Eden (~2350 BC or 4,500 years ago), the people of the world grew so wicked that God allowed a global flood, a violent cataclysm, to occur to punish and make atonement the sins of men (Genesis 6). Noe’s flood wasn’t a local flood or a hurricane, but a world-wide calamity, wiping out the entire earth’s population, save for 8 people and those creatures kept on the ark; killing much animal and plant life – including most of the dinosaurs), and leaving in its wake, a different reshaped earth that we see today.

The continents shifted, mountain ranges formed, weather conditions changed due to fluctuating ocean temperatures due to oceanic volcanic activity , and an ice age fomed due to the likely volcanic activity and excessive water vapor left in its wake. The entire pre-flood world of Adam was practically erased. This catastrophy was the true occurrence of “climate change” and it was caused not by pollution, carbon dioxide or “conservative voters”, but by sins of man.  Sadly, we live in a time when people deny Noah’s flood as St. Peter prophesized in 2 Peter 3-6:

Knowing this first, that in the last days there shall come scoffers with deceit, walking according to their own lusts, Saying: Where is his promise or his coming? For, since the fathers slept, all things continue so from the beginning of the creation.  For this they are wilfully ignorant of, that the heavens were before, and the earth, out of water and through water, consisting by the word of God: Whereby the world that then was, being overflowed with water, perished.

This is important to know, as Our Lady of Akita warned in 1973 (approved apparition in Japan), that the sins of today will bring an even worse chastisement than Noe’s flood:

If man does not repent, the Heavenly Father will inflict a punishment worse than the Deluge, such as one will never have seen before.  Fire will fall from the sky, wiping out a great part of humanity, the good as well as the bad, sparing neither priest nor faithful (Mother of God to Sister Agnes Sasagawa, October 13, 1973).

If Catholics want avert this we can do no better than learn the Church’s doctrine of creation, which offers a beautiful Catholic alternative to the atheist evolutionary agenda promoted by today’s pagans and tragically deceived Catholics – which continues to feed the culture of death. Toward this end, the CLMC was proud to co-host the Kolbe Center for Creation in 2019 to present this doctrine. We invite our readers to watch the conference:

Additionally, these articles provide some excellent background and science that confirms Noe’s flood and the biblical accounts in Genesis:

The Latin Mass & Creation

Lastly, we should also note, that the Church, through the Traditional Latin Mass, and the customs, culture and Sacred Tradition that accompany it, promote the traditional doctrine of creation, and God’s providence over it in various ways. Whether from the Ember Days each season where we thank God for the blessings of creation, to the Rogation Days (coming this Sunday April 25) which used to have the blessing of fields accompany it; to the blessing of St. Peter of Verona Palms (April 29) to protect against natural disasters, the blessing of herbs on the feast of the Assumption, to the giving thanks for the harvest on Martinmas Day (November 11), are among many customs and traditions. The Traditional Latin Mass has creation, agriculture and farming incorporated into its liturgy, and liturgical calendar.  Space does not permit us to begin to touch upon the impact cloistered traditional monastic communities have in promoting agriculture and the land. However we do include the March 2021 letter from Clear Creek Abbey in Oklahoma which gives a brief description. (click here: clear-creek-abbey-march-2021-letter)

If you have friends who are environmentalists, gardeners, farmers, or homesteaders, you may consider inviting them to the Traditional Latin Mass, which has done well to safeguard creation from its worst enemy – the sins of men.  A full return to the Traditional Latin Mass in every parish, for every Mass may be the best thing to “save” the environment – and more importantly – to save souls. Have we asked our pastors for this yet?